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BULLETIN 

of 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY 



Greensboro 




REFERENCE DEPT. 
F.D. BLUFORD LIBRARY 
N.C. A&T STATE UNIVERSITY 
GREENSBORO, NC 27411 



GRADUATE 

BULLETIN 

1994-1996 




BULLETIN OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL 
AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 



Vol. 3, No. 1 



July, 1994 



BULLETIN OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE 
UNIVERSITY — Published monthly seven times a year except January, March, 
September, October, and November by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University, 1601 East Market Street, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411. 

Application to Mail at Second Class Postage Rates at Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Postmaster: Send Address Changes to BULLETIN OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRI- 
CULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY, 1601 East Market 
Street, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411. 



This catalog was produced at a cost of $2.25 per copy. 



BULLETIN 

of 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY 



Greensboro 



GRADUATE 
BULLETIN 
1994-1996 









Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofnorthc8nort 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GENERAL INFORMATION 7 

History 7 

Purpose 10 

Organization 11 

Administrative Officers 12 

Degrees Granted 16 

ADMISSION AND OTHER INFORMATION 18 

Admission to Master's Degree Programs 18 

Admission to Doctoral Programs 19 

Housing 19 

Food Services 19 

Immunization Information for Graduate Students 19 

Drug Education Policy 20 

Residence Status for Tuition Purposes 23 

Financial Assistance 25 

Expenses 26 

Schedule of Deadlines 26 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 27 

Advising 27 

Class Loads 27 

Concurrent Registration in Other Institutions 27 

Grading System 27 

Professional Education Requirements for Class A Teaching Certificate 28 

Subject-Matter Requirements for Class A Teaching Certificate 28 

REGULATIONS FOR A MASTER'S DEGREE 29 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree 29 

Credit Requirements 29 

Residence Requirements 30 

The Plan of Study 30 

Credit Requirements 30 

Time Limitation 30 

Course Levels 30 

Transfer of Credit 31 

Final Comprehensive Examination 31 

Options for Degree Program 31 

Master's Thesis and Format 32 

Application for Graduation 33 

Graduate Record Examination 33 

Second Master's Degree 33 

Administrative Policy Concerning Changes in Requirements 

for Students Enrolled in Degree Programs 34 

Commencement 34 

Additional Regulations 34 

REGULATIONS FOR THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 34 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 35 

Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 35 

Agricultural Education and Extension 37 

Animal Science 38 

Art 40 

Biology 42 

Chemistry 45 

Computer Science 48 

Curriculum and Instruction 50 

Reading 51 

Elementary Education 53 

Educational Media 56 

Economics (Graduate courses only) 58 

Educational Leadership and Policy 58 

Administration 60 

Curriculum Instructional Specialist 61 

Adult Education 62 

Architectural Engineering 63 

Electrical Engineering 67 

Engineering 71 

Chemical Engineering 73 

Civil Engineering 74 

Industrial Engineering 76 

Mechanical Engineering 78 



English 88 

Foreign Languages 91 

Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 93 

Technology Education 94 

Vocational-Industrial Education 95 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 97 

History 99 

Human Development and Services 102 

Counselor Education 103 

Human Resources Concentration (Agency Counseling) 104 

Human Resources Concentration (Business and Industry) 105 

Human Environment and Family Sciences 106 

Manufacturing Systems 110 

Industrial Technology 112 

Mathematics 112 

Music (Graduate courses only) 114 

Natural Resources and Environmental Design 115 

Physics (Graduate courses only) 115 

Political Science (Graduate courses only) 117 

Speech and Drama (Graduate courses only) 117 

Sociology and Social Work 118 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (ALL DEPARTMENTS) 118 

Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 118 

Agricultural Education and Extension 121 

Animal Science 123 

Art 126 

Biology 127 

Chemistry 131 

Computer Science 135 

Curriculum and Instruction 139 

Economics 147 

Educational Leadership and Policy 148 

Architectural Engineering 153 

Chemical Engineering 156 

Engineering 157 

Civil Engineering 158 

Electrical Engineering 161 

Industrial Engineering 166 

Mechanical Engineering 168 

English 174 

Foreign Languages 178 

Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 179 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 183 

History 185 

Human Development and Services 187 

Human Environment and Family Sciences 190 

Manufacturing Systems 193 

Mathematics 194 

Music 198 

Natural Resources and Environmental Design 198 

Physics 202 

Political Science 203 

Speech and Drama 204 

Sociology and Social Work 205 




TO: STUDENTS AND PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

North Carolina A&T State University is a very unique, comprehensive, 
doctoral degree granting, state-assisted University. It is the only such 
institution in the State of North Carolina with both a College of Engineer- 
ing and a School of Agriculture— in concert with its well known land-grant 
tradition. Its program offerings, in addition, include those which are 
offered within the College of Arts and Sciences, the Schools of Business and 
Economics, Education and Nursing. And, the Graduate School continues 
with its nationally known recognized uniqueness. Additionally, the School 
of Technology places heavy emphasis upon programs geared to accommo- 
date this University's hi-tech mode. Consequently, matriculating students 
have been provided unique and outstanding programmatic offerings— ones 
which traverse the excitement of laser technology, computerized instruc- 
tion, and robotics. 

The University maintains forty-one (41) graduate programs, including 
new Master's Degrees in Industrial Technology — and the Campus has, 
additionally, been approved for the planning of new Master's Degrees in 
Civil Engineering and Chemical Engineering. Within the past year— a new 
Master's Degree in the College of Engineering's Computer Science Pro- 
gram was initiated. Additionally, North Carolina A&T State University 
became the first historically minority institution in the State of North 
Carolina to be given authorization to initiate Ph.D Degrees in the twin 
disciplines of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. Twenty-two (22) 
new doctoral students have been admitted to these programs — having 
begun in January of 1994. 

This catalogue provides specific information you will need to know as 
pertains to the operation of the Campus; however, it should be noted that the 
University is more than program offerings. It is a small city of 8,000 
students and a faculty and administrative team which are second to none. 
Additionally, 30,000 alumni are scattered throughout the world as repre- 
sentative of this world-class institution. This Campus can be best described 
as one committed to excellence. North Carolina A&T State University 
would be a barren place without its adherence to that thesis. And, of course, 
this is what contributes to this well recognized heritage and tradition. That 
tradition is constantly depicted in the lives of the institution's torch bearers 
as well as outstanding young men and women who left a lasting legacy 
during their student days on campus. When one combines this heritage 
with the superior quality of our faculty, the state-of-the-art expertise of our 
administrative team, and the University's commitment to excellence and 
the soundness of its mission-related programs, one readily discerns why it is 
that this institution is the place to be. It is truly a magnificent University! 

As Chancellor — I commend these programs and this University to all 
students and to all prospective students. 

Edward B. Fort 
Chancellor 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

GREENSBORO 

1994-95 University Academic Calendar 



FALL SEMESTER 1994 

August 5— Friday 



August 9— Tuesday 

August 11— Thursday 
August 12, Friday 
August 14— Sunday 
August 14— Sunday 
August 15— Monday 
August 15— Monday 
August 15-16— Monday-Tuesday 
August 16— Tuesday 

August 17— Wednesday 

August 18-20— Thursday-Saturday 

August 22— Monday 
August 26— Friday 
August 26— Friday 
August 26— Friday 
September 5— Monday 
September 6— Tuesday 
September 19— Monday 
October 3— Monday 



October 15- 
October 15- 
October 17- 
October 19- 
October 27- 
October 27- 
October 29- 
October 29- 



-Saturday 

-Saturday 

-Monday 

-Wednesday 

-Thursday 

-Thursday 

-Saturday 

-Saturday 



November 14-18— Monday-Friday 
November 8— Tuesday 

November 21— Monday 
November 23— Wednesday 
November 23— Wednesday 
November 27— Sunday 
November 28— Monday 
December 6— Tuesday 

December 7— Wednesday 
December 8— Thursday 



Last day to pay/make acceptable financial arrangements 
for Fall semester 1994 registration to avoid cancellation 
of housing 

Last day to pay/make acceptable financial arrangements 
for Fall semester 1994 registration to avoid cancellation 
of classes 

Administrators' Conference 
Faculty Meeting/Faculty-Staff Institute 
Freshman students report 
Residence halls open for freshmen 
Transfer students report 

Residence halls open for transfer/readmitted students 
Orientation- Advisement of freshmen and transfers 
Residence halls open for upperclass and graduate stu- 
dents 

REGISTRATION-New freshman, transfer, readmitted 
and new graduate students 

LATE REGISTRATION-Upperclassmen/graduate 
students 
Classes begin 

Late registration ends (CENSUS DATE) 
Last day to add/Last day to audit a course 
Last day to drop a course and receive financial credit 
Holiday (Labor Day) 

Last day to apply for fall semester graduation 
Grade evaluation for student athletes 
Deadline to remove incompletes received Spring and 
Summer 1994 
UNIVERSITY DAY 
Fall break begins at 12:00 (noon) 
Mid-term grades due for freshmen and athletes 
Fall break ends at 7:00 a.m. 
FOUNDERS DAY 

Last day to drop a course without grade evaluation 
HOMECOMING 

Deadline for international student applications admitted 
Spring semester 

REGISTRATION for Spring semester 1995 
Last day to withdraw from the University without grade 
evaluation 

Grade evaluation for student athletes 
Thanksgiving holidays begin at 1:00 p.m. 
Residence halls close 
Residence halls re-open 
Thanksgiving holidays end at 7:00 a.m. 
Applications for Spring semester admission to the Uni- 
versity are due 
Classes end 
Reading Day 



December 9— Friday 
December 16— Friday 
December 16— Friday 
December 16— Friday 



December 17— Saturday 
December 19— Monday 



Final examinations begin 
Final examinations end 
Fall semester ends, Christmas holidays begin 
Last day to pay/make acceptable financial arrangements 
for Spring Semester 1995 registration to avoid cancella- 
tion of classes 
Residence halls close 

All grades are due in the Office of the Registrar by 3:00 
p.m. 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

1994-95 University Academic Calendar 



SPRING SEMESTER 1995 

January 3— Tuesday 
January 4— Wednesday 
January 4— Wednesday 
January 5— Thursday 

January 5-6, Thursday-Friday 
January 6-7— Friday-Saturday 

January 6-7— Friday-Saturday 
January 9— Monday 
January 13— Friday 
January 13— Friday 
January 13— Friday 
January 13— Friday 
January 16— Monday 
January 18— Wednesday 
January 23— Monday 

February 10— Friday 
February 12— Friday 
March 2— Thursday 
March 4— Saturday 
March 13— Monday 
March 22— Wednesday 
March 29— Wednesday 
April 3— Monday 

April 3-5— Monday- Wednesday 
April 12— Wednesday 
April 14— Friday 
April 25— Tuesday 
April 26— Wednesday 
April 27— Thursday 
May 4— Thursday 
May 5— Friday 

May 10— Wednesday 
May 7— Sunday 
May 14— Sunday 



Faculty report 

Residence halls open for freshmen and transfers 
Freshman and transfer students report 
Residence halls open for upperclass and graduate stu- 
dents 

Orientation— Advisement of freshmen and transfers 
REGISTRATION for new freshmen, transfer, readmit- 
ted and new graduate students 
LATE REGISTRATION for Continuing Students 
Classes begin 

Late registration ends (CENSUS DAY) 
Last day to add a course 

Last day to drop a course and receive financial credit 
Last day to audit a course 

University Holiday (Martin Luther King's birthday) 
Last day to apply for spring semester graduation 
Ronald E. McNair Memorial Day (classes are not 
cancelled) 

Grade evaluation for athletes 
Deadline to remove incompletes received Fall 1994 
Mid-term grades due— freshmen/athletes 
*Spring break begins at 12:00 (noon) 
Spring break ends at 7:00 a.m. 
Spring semester Convocation 
Last day to drop a course without grade evaluation 
Last day to withdraw from the University without grade 
evaluation 

REGISTRATION for Fall 1995 
Third grade evaluation for student athletes 
University holiday (Good Friday) 
Classes end 
Reading Day 
Final examinations begin 
Final examinations end 

All grades are due in the Office of the Registrar by 9:00 
a.m. 

Graduation letters for seniors, 2:00 p.m. 
COMMENCEMENT 
Residence Halls close 



NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY AND INTEGRATION STATEMENT 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is committed to 
equality of educational opportunity and does not discriminate against applicants, 
students, or employees based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or 
handicap. Moreover, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is 
open to people of all races and actively seeks to promote racial integration by 
recruiting and enrolling a larger number of white students. 

North Carolina A&T State University supports the protections available to 
members of its community under all applicable Federal Laws, including Titles VI 
and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 
1972, Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age 
Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Executive Order 11246. 



HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

In North Carolina, all the public educational institutions that grant baccalaureate 
degrees are part of the University of North Carolina. North Carolina A. and T. State 
is one of 16 constituent institutions of the multi-campus state university. 

The University of North Carolina, chartered by the N.C. General Assembly in 
1789, was the first public university in the United States to open its doors and the only 
one to graduate students in the eighteenth century. The first class was admitted in 
Chapel Hill in 1795. For the next 136 years, the only campus of the University of 
North Carolina was at Chapel Hill. 

In 1877, the North Carolina General Assembly began sponsoring additional insti- 
tutions of higher education, diverse in origin and purpose. Five were historically 
black institutions, and another was founded to educate American Indians. Several 
were created to prepare teachers for the public schools. Others had a technological 
emphasis. One is a training school for performing artists. 

In 1931, the North Carolina General Assembly redefined the University of North 
Carolina to include three state-supported institutions: the campus at Chapel Hill 
(now the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), North Carolina State College 
(now North Carolina State University at Raleigh), and Woman's College (now the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro). The new multi-campus University 
operated with one board of trustees and one president. By 1969, three additional 
campuses had joined the University through legislative action: the University of 
North Carolina at Charlotte, the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and the 
University of North Carolina at Wilmington. 

In 1971, the General Assembly passed legislation bringing into the University of 
North Carolina the state's ten remaining public senior institutions, each of which had 
until then been legally separate: Appalachian State University, East Carolina Uni- 
versity, Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University, North Carolina Central Univer- 
sity, the North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western 
Carolina University, and Winston-Salem State University. This action created the 
current 16-campus University. (In 1985, the North Carolina School of Science and 
Mathematics, a residential high school for gifted students, was declared an affiliated 
school of the University.) 

The University of North Carolina Board of Governors is the policy-making body 
legally charged with "the general determination, control, supervision, management, 
and governance of all affairs of the constituent institutions." It elects the president, 
who administers the University. The 32 voting members of the Board of Governors 
are elected by the General Assembly for four-year terms. Former board chairmen 
and board members who are former governors of North Carolina may continue to 
serve for limited periods as non-voting members emeriti. The president of the UNC 
Association of Student Governments, or that student's designee, is also a non-voting 
member. 

Each of the 16 constituent institutions is headed by a chancellor, who is chosen by 
the Board of Governors on the president's nomination and is responsible to the 
president. Each institution has a board of trustees, consisting of eight members 
elected by the Board of Governors, four appointed by the governor, and the president 
of the student body, who serves ex -officio. (The NC School of the Arts has two 
additional ex-officio members.) Each board of trustees holds extensive powers over 
academic and other operations of its institution on delegation from the Board of 
Governors. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Board of Governors 
The University of North Carolina 

Class of 1995 Class of 1997 

C. C. Cameron Roderick D. Adams 

J. Earl Danieley G. Irvin Aldridge 

Charles D. Evans Mark L. Bibbs 

Alexander M. Hall Lois G. Britt 

Valeria L. Lee John F.A.V. Cecil 

James G. Martin Bert Collins 

Samuel H. Poole John A. Garwood 

W. Travis Porter Wallace N. Hyde 

Marshall A. Rauch Jack P. Jordan 

Benjamin S. Ruffin Helen R. Marvin 

Joseph H. Stallings D. Samuel Neill 

Thomas F. Taft Ellen S. Newbold 

H. Patrick Taylor, Jr. Maxine H. O'Kelley 

Priscilla P. Taylor D. Wayne Peterson 

Joseph E. Thomas H. D. Reaves 

Barbara D. Willis-Duncan Harold H. Webb 



Members Emeriti 

Philip G. Carson 
James E. Holshouser, Jr. 
Robert L. Jones 
John R. Jordan, Jr. 

Ex-Officio 

Michael Myrick 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

C. D. Spangler, Jr., B.S., M.B .A., D.H.L., LL.D.— President 

William F. Little, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.— Vice President— Academic Affairs 

Roy Carroll, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. — Vice President — Planning 

Nathan Simms, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D.— Vice President— Student Services and Special 

Programs 
L. Felix Joyner, A.B. — Vice President — Finance 

Jasper D. Memory, B.S., Ph.D. — Vice President — Research and Public Service 
Wyndham Robertson, A.B.— Vice President— Communications 
David G. Martin, B.A., LL.B.— Vice President— Public Affairs 
Rosalind Fuse-Hall, B.A., J.D., —Secretary to the University 
Richard H. Robinson, Jr., A.B., LL.B.— Assistant to the President 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University was established as 
the A. and M. College for the "Colored Race" by an act of the General Assembly of 
North Carolina ratified March 9, 1891. The act read in part: 

That the leading object of the institution shall be to teach practical 
agriculture and the mechanic arts and such branches of learning as 
relate thereto, not excluding academical and classical instruction. 
The College began operation during the school year of 1890-91, before the passage 
of the state law creating it. This curious circumstance arose out of the fact that the 
Morrill Act passed by Congress in 1890 earmarked the proportionate funds to be 
allocated in biracial school systems to the two races. The A. and M. College for the 
White Race was established by the State Legislature in 1889 and was ready to receive 
its share of funds provided by the Morrill Act in the Fall of 1890. Before the college 
could receive these funds, however, it was necessary to make provisions for Colored 
students. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees of the A. and M. College in Raleigh was 
empowered to make temporary arrangements for these students. A plan was worked 
out with Shaw University in Raleigh where the College operated as an annex to Shaw 
University during the years 1890-1891, 1891-1892, and 1892-1893. 

The law of 1891 also provided that the College would be located in such city or town 
in the State as would make to the Board of Trustees a suitable proposition that would 
serve as an inducement for said location. A group of interested citizens in the city of 
Greensboro donated fourteen acres of land for a site and $11,000 to aid in construct- 
ing buildings. This amount was supplemented by an appropriation of $2,500 from 
the General Assembly. The first building was completed in 1893 and the College 
opened in Greensboro during the fall of that year. 

In 1915 the name of the institution was changed to The Agricultural and Technical 
College of North Carolina by an Act of the State Legislature. 

The scope of the college program has been enlarged to take care of new demands. 
The General Assembly authorized the institution to grant the Master of Science 
degree in education and certain other fields in 1939. The first Master's degree was 
awarded in 1941. The School of Nursing was established by an Act of the State 
Legislature in 1953 and the first class was graduated in 1957. 

The General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the purpose of the Col- 
lege in 1957, and redefined its purpose as follows: 

"The primary purpose of the College shall be to teach the Agricultural 
and Technical Arts and Sciences and such branches of learning as 
related thereto; the training of teachers, supervisors, and administra- 
tors for the public schools of the State, including the preparation of such 
teachers, supervisors and administrators for the Master's degree. Such 
other programs of a professional or occupational nature may be offered 
as shall be approved by the North Carolina Board of Higher Education, 
consistent with the appropriations made therefor." 
The General Assembly of North Carolina voted to elevate the College to the status 
of a Regional University effective July 1, 1967. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly ratified an Act to consolidate the 
Institutions of Higher Learning in North Carolina. Under the provisions of this Act, 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University became a constituent 
institution of The University of North Carolina effective July 1, 1972. 

Six presidents have served the Institution since it was founded in 1891. They are as 
follows: Dr. J.O. Crosby (1892-1896), Dr. James B. Dudley (1896-1925), Dr. F.D. 



Bluford (1925-1955), Dr. Warmoth T. Gibbs (1956-1960), Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor 
(1960-1964), and Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy, who was elected President April 10, 1964. Dr. 
Cleon F. Thompson, Jr., served as Interim Chancellor of the Institution from 
November 1, 1980 until August 31, 1981. Dr. Edward B. Fort assumed Chancellor- 
ship responsibilities on September 1, 1981. 

HISTORY AND PURPOSE OF THE 
SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

Graduate education at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Univer- 
sity was authorized by the North Carolina State Legislature in 1939. The authoriza- 
tion provided for training in agriculture, technology, applied sciences and other 
approved areas of study. An extension of the graduate program approved by the 
General Assembly of North Carolina in 1957, provided for enlargement of the 
curriculum to include teacher education, as well as such other programs of a profes- 
sional or occupational nature as might be approved by the North Carolina Board of 
Higher Education. 

On July 1, 1967, the Legislature of North Carolina approved regional university 
status for the institution and renamed it North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University. Since that time, we have been called a comprehensive and even 
more recently a research entity as many of our programs are involved in significant 
research efforts. The graduate responsibilities of institutions so labeled are to pre- 
pare teachers, supervisors, and administrators for master's degrees, to offer master's 
degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences and to conduct such other programs 
as are deemed necessary to meet the needs of its constituency and of the state. 

The University awarded its first master's degree in 1941 to Woodland Ellroy Hall. 
Since that time, nearly 6,700 students have received this coveted degree of advanced 
studies. A significant number of these graduates have gone on to other universities to 
achieve the prestigious doctorate degree in their chosen specialties. More than two 
dozen or so of these graduates have returned to augment the academic acclaim of this 
institution at the undergraduate levels in varied specialties, and larger numbers 
have emerged from the advanced levels of the university to serve in public schools, 
government, industry, business, religious and social agencies. 

The School of Graduate Studies through its various disciplines is affiliated with 
the American Chemical Society, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology, Inc. (ABET), the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education, The Council of Graduate Schools, The Conference of Southern Graduate 
Schools, The Council of Historically Black Graduate Schools, the North Carolina 
Conference of Graduate Schools, and other prestigious regional and national bodies. 
In addition, many graduate faculty members are associated with distinguished 
academic and professional organizations that have international acclaim and 
relationships. 

The School of Graduate Studies has an integrated and intercultural faculty and 
student body and beckons students from all over the world. It coordinates and 
administers advanced course offerings in all departments within the School of 
Agriculture, the School of Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of 
Engineering, and the School of Technology. Thus, the School of Graduate Studies 
offers advanced study for qualified individuals who wish to improve their compet- 
ency for careers in professions related to agriculture, humanities, education, social 
studies, science and technology. Such study of information, techniques and skills is 
provided through curricula leading to the Master of Science, Master of Arts or the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree and through institutes and workshops designed for 
those who are not candidates for a higher degree. Second, the School of Graduate 
Studies provides a foundation of knowledge and of techniques for those who wish to 
continue their education in doctoral programs at other institutions or within the 

10 



institution as it expands into the doctoral arena. Third, the School of Graduate 
Studies assumes the responsibility of encouraging scholarly research among stu- 
dents and faculty members. 

It is expected that, while studying at this university, graduate students (1) will 
acquire special competence in one or multiple fields of knowledge, (2) will develop 
further their ability to think independently and constructively, (3) will develop and 
demonstrate the ability to collect, organize, evaluate, create and report facts which 
will enable them to make a scholarly contribution to knowledge about their disci- 
pline, and (4) will make new application and adaptation of existing knowledge so as 
to contribute to their profession and to humankind. 

Seven persons have served as dean of the School of Graduate Studies since its 
beginning in 1939. They are: Dr. Wadaran L. Kennedy (1939-1951), Dr. Frederick A. 
Williams (1951-1961), Dr. George C. Royal (1961-1965, Mr. J. Niel Armstrong (1965- 
1966), Dr. Darwin Turner (1966-1969), Dr. Albert W. Spruill, (1970-1993), and Dr. 
Meada Gibbs (1993- ). 

ORGANIZATION 

School of Graduate Studies Council 

The School of Graduate Studies Council is responsible for formulating all aca- 
demic policies and regulations affecting graduate students, graduate courses, and 
graduate curricula. The council consists of the chairpersons of the departments 
offering concentrations in graduate studies, the deans of the schools offering gradu- 
ate instruction, the Director of the Summer School, the Vice Chancellor for Aca- 
demic Affairs, the Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs, the 
Director of Admissions, the Director of Registration and Records, and the Director of 
Teacher Education, five graduate students elected from the Association of Graduate 
Students, and five faculty members selected from the graduate faculty. The Dean of 
the Graduate School serves as chairperson of the council. 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Standing committees of the Graduate School are organized to advise the Council on 
matters pertaining to present policies, to evaluate existing and proposed programs of 
study, and to process student petitions relating to academic matters. These commit- 
tees are: 

Committee on Admissions and Retention 

Committee on Curriculum 

Committee on Publications 

Committee on Rules and Policy 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Carl Ashby, III Greensboro, NC 

Keith Bryant Greensboro, NC 

Charles D. Bussey Adelphi, MD 

Howard Chubbs Greensboro, NC 

Thurmon L. Deloney Greensboro, NC. 

John Downard Charlotte, NC 

Joseph L. Dudley Greensboro, NC 

11 



Thomas L. Farrington Waltham, MA 

Vickie Fuller New York, NY 

Suni Miller Greensboro, NC 

Jimmie Morris Oxford, NC 

Alexander W. Spears III Greensboro, NC 

John Wooten Goldsboro, NC 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edward B. Fort, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Chancellor 

Harold L. Martin, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 

Sullivian Welborne, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor 

for Student Affairs 

Norman Handy, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Development 

and University Relations 

Charles Mclntyre, B.S., M.B.A Vice Chancellor for Business 

and Finance 

Earnestine Psalmonds, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Research 

and Sponsored Programs 

Dorothy J. Alston, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Special Assistant to the 

Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 

Benjamin E. Rawlins, B.A., J.D Special Assistant to the Chancellor 

Legal Counsel 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Harold L. Martin, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 

Charles Williams, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Associate Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs 

Ronald 0. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 

Lonnie Sharpe, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Acting Dean, College of Engineering 

Quiester Craig, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Business 

and Economics 

A. James Hicks, B.S., Ph.D Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

David Boger, B.S., M.S. Ph.D Dean, School of Education 

Meada Gibbs, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, The Graduate School 

Daniel Godfrey, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, School of Agriculture 

Beverly Malone, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, School of Nursing 

Earl Yarbrough, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Technology 

Waltrene Canada, A.B., M.L.S Director of Library Services 

Doris Graham, B.S., M.S University Registrar 

John Smith, B.S., M.S Director of Admissions 

Lt. Col. Ronald K. Murphy, B.S., M.S Professor of Aerospace Studies 

Robert Weeks, B.A., M.P.A Professor of Military Science 



12 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Sullivan Welborne, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor 

for Student Affairs 

Robert L. Wilson, A.B., M.S., Ph.D Director of Counseling Services 

Leon Warren, B.S., M.S Director of Career Planning and Placement 

James Armstrong, B.S., M.A Director of Memorial Union 

Sharon Richards Martin, B.S., M.S Director of International Student Affairs 

Peggy Oliphant, B.S., M.S Director of Veterans and 

Handicapped Student Affairs 

Linda Bowling, B.S., M.S Director of Health Services 

Marva Watlington, B.S., M.S Director of Student Activities 

FISCAL AFFAIRS 

Charles C. Mclntyre, B.S., M.B.A Vice Chancellor for Business 

and Finance 

Paula Jeffries, B.S Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Business and Finance and Comptroller 

Maxine D. Davis, B.S., M.S Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Business and Finance and Business Manager 

Renee Martin Acting Director of Student Financial Aid 

Jonah Smith, B.S Budget Director 

Scott Hummel, B.S., C.P.A Director of Accounting 

Lillian M. Couch, B.S Director of Personnel Services 

Joseph Daughtry, A. A., B.A Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Business and Finance Facilities 

Bobby Aldrich, B.A Director of Purchasing 

Andre James, B.S Director of Auxiliary Services 

Eugene Backmon, B.S Director of Physical Plant 

Shirley Medley, B.S., M.S Treasurer 

DEVELOPMENT AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Norman Handy, B.S., D.D., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for Development 

and University Relations 
Lillie King, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Development and University Relations 
Richard Moore, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Development and University Relations 

Velma Speight, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Director of Alumni Affairs 

Charles Mooney, B.A Director of Sports Information 

Lorethea Graves, B.S., M.S Acting Director of Cooperative Education 

ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Dorothy J. Alston, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Special Assistant to the Chancellor 

Jewel H. Stewart, B.A., M.A., Ed.D Director of Institutional 

Research and Planning 

Willie J. Mooring, B.S Director of Computer Center 

Sharon Neal, B.A Salary Administrator 

Reginald Wade, B.S Internal Auditor 



13 



OFFICER EMERITUS 

Lewis C. Dowdy, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Litt.D Chancellor Emeritus 

GRADUATE COUNCIL MEMBERS 

1994-95 

Meada Gibbs, Ph.D Dean, School of Graduate Studies 

and Chairperson 

Harold L. Martin, Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Doris Graham, M.S University Registrar 

David Boger, Ph.D Dean, School of Education 

Deborah J. Callaway, Ed.D Chairperson, Department of Health and 

Physical Education 

Henry T. Cameron, Ed.D Chairperson, Department of Educational Leader 

William J. Craft, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Nita Dewberry, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Foreign Languages 

Patricia Donnell Student Representative 

Anissa Fields Student Representative 

Stacie Frazier Student Representative 

Godfrey Gayle, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Natural Resources 

and Environmental Design 

Daniel Godfrey, Ph.D Dean, School of Agriculture 

Ronald Helms, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Architectural Engineering 

A. James Hicks, Ph.D Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Timothy Hicks, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Art 

William James, MSIT Faculty Representative 

George Johnson, D.V.M Chairperson, Department of Animal Science 

Franklin King, D.Sc Chairperson, Department of Chemical Engineering 

Sarah Kirk, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Sociology and Social Work 

Wyatt Kirk, Ed.D Chairperson, Department of Human 

Development and Services 

Gary Lebby, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Electrical Engineering 

Joyce McCray Student Representative 

Peter Meyers, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of History 

and Social Science 

Joseph Monroe, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Computer Science 

Kenneth Murray, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Civil Engineering 

Lanell Ogden, Ph.D Faculty Representative 

Kofi Obeng, Ph.D Faculty Representative 

Eui Park, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Industrial Engineering 

Earnestine Psalmonds, Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Research and 

Sponsored Programs 

Rosa Purcell, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Human Environment 

and Family Science 

Robert Pyle, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Graphic Communication 

Systems and Technological Studies 

Richard Robbins, Ph.D Acting Chairperson, Department of 

Agricultural Economics 

Barbara Saunders, Ph.D Acting Chairperson, Department of 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Lonnie Sharpe, Jr., Ph.D Interim Dean, College of Engineering 

John Smith, M.S Director of Admissions 



14 



Ronald 0. Smith, Ph.D Director of Continuing Education and 

Summer School 

Wilbur Smith, Ph.D. Chairperson, Department of Mathematics 

Alton Thompson, Ph.D Acting Chairperson, Department of Agricultural 

Economics 

Abhay Trivedi, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Manufacturing Systems 

Joseph Whittaker, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Biology 

Jimmy L. Williams, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of English 

Alex Williamson, Ph.D Chairperson, Department of Chemistry 

Earl Yarbrough, Ph.D Dean, School of Technology 

Chung Yu, Ph.D Faculty Representative 



THE CITY 

The City of Greensboro offers a variety of cultural, intellectual, social and recrea- 
tional activities. It has become known for its colleges and universities, art galleries 
and museum, and other features make the setting generally a good place in which to 
live and study. 

The Memorial Auditorium and Coliseum, now being expanded, attract outstand- 
ing athletic events, concerts, meetings and other popular events. The City offers 
facilities for bowling, boating, fishing, horseback riding, tennis, golf, and other 
recreational activities. 



THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

The university campus comprises modern, fire resistant buildings, all thoroughly 
maintained for the highest level of efficiency, located on land holdings in excess of 
181 acres. 



UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 

Lewis C. Dowdy Building (Administration) 

Dudley Memorial Building 

F.D. Bluford Library 

Harrison Auditorium 

Charles Moore Gymnasium 

Coltrane Hall (Headquarters for N.C. Agriculture Extension Service) 

Memorial Union 

The Oaks (President's Residence) 

Corbett Sports Center 



CLASSROOM AND LABORATORY BUILDINGS 

Carver Hall School of Agriculture 

Cherry Hall College of Engineering 

Crosby Hall College of Arts and Sciences 

Gibbs Hall Social Sciences and School of Graduate Studies 

Hodgin Hall School of Education 

Marteena Hall Mathematics and Physics 

Merrick Hall School of Business and Economics 

Noble Hall School of Nursing 

Price Hall School of Technology 



15 



Benbow Hall Home Economics 

Garret House Home Economics 

Hines Hall Chemistry 

Sockwell Hall Agricultural Technology 

Ward Hall Dairy Manufacturing 

Reid Greenhouses 

McNair Hall College of Engineering 

Graham Hall College of Engineering 

Frazier Hall Music— Art 

Price Hall School of Technology 

Price Hall Annex Child Development Laboratory 

Campbell Hall ROTC Headquarters 

Barnes Hall Biology 

Burleigh C. Webb Hall School of Agriculture 



RESIDENCE HALLS 

Barbee Hall Morrow Hall (200) Morrison Hall (94) 

Cooper Hall (400) Haley Hall Scott Hall (1010) 

Curtis Hall (148) Holland Hall (144) Vanstory Hall (200) 



SERVICE BUILDINGS 

Murphy Hall Student Services 

Brown Hall Post Office 

Sebastian Infirmary 
T.E. Neal Heating Plant 
Laundry — Dry Cleaning Plant 

William Hall Cafeteria 

Clyde DeHuguley Physical Plant Building 



OTHER FACILITIES 

University Farms — including 600 acres of land and modern farm buildings 
Athletic field — including three practice fields for football, quarter mile track, base- 
ball diamond and field house. 



DEGREES GRANTED 

The School of Graduate Studies of North Carolina A. and T. State University offers 
the following degrees: 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. Electrical Engineering 

2. Mechanical Engineering 
MASTER OF ARTS 

English and Afro- American Literature 



16 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

1. Agricultural Economics 

A. Agricultural Marketing 

B. Production Economics 

C. Rural Development 

2. Agricultural Education 

3. Animal Health Science 

4. Applied Mathematics 

5. Biology 

6. Chemistry 

7. Computer Science 

8. Education 

A. Administration 

B. Adult Education 

C. Educational Media 

D. Elementary Education 

E. Secondary Education 

1. Art 

2. Biology 

3. Chemistry 

4. English 

5. History 

6. Mathematics 

7. Health and Physical Education 

8. Reading 

9. Social Science 

F. Guidance 

1. Counselor Education 

2. Human Resource (Agency Counseling) 

3. Human Resource (Business and Industry) 

9. Architectural Engineering 

10. Electrical Engineering 

11. Engineering 

12. Industrial Engineering 

13. Mechanical Engineering 

14. Plant and Soil Science 

15. Food and Nutrition 

16. French 

17. Technology Education 

A. Technology Education 

B. Vocational Industrial Education 

18. Industrial Technology 

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

1. Social Work (Joint with UNC-G) 
(Effective August, 1995) 



17 



ADMISSION AND OTHER INFORMATION 

ADMISSION TO MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Applicants to the Master's degree program for graduate study must have earned a 
bachelor's degree from a four-year college. Application forms must be submitted to 
the School of Graduate Studies Office with two transcripts of previous undergradu- 
ate and graduate studies. Applicants may be admitted to graduate studies uncondi- 
tionally, provisionally, or as special students. Applicants are admitted without dis- 
crimination because of race, color, creed, or sex. 

Unconditional Admission 

To qualify for unconditional admission to the master's degree program for gradu- 
ate study, an applicant must have earned an over-all average of 2.6 on a 4 point 
system (or 1.6 on a 3 point system) in his/her undergraduate studies. Some programs 
require a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale; therefore, applicants should check 
appropriate sections of the Graduate Bulletin to ascertain the minimum grade point 
average required. In addition, a student seeking a degree in Agricultural Education, 
Elementary Education, Industrial Education, or Secondary Education must pos- 
sess, or be qualified to possess, a Class A Teaching Certificate in the area in which 
he/she wishes to concentrate his/her graduate studies. A student seeking a degree 
with a concentration in Administration or Guidance must possess, or be qualified to 
possess, a Class A Teaching Certificate. See certification except for Vocational- 
Industrial Education (post secondary/private industry). 

Provisional Admission 

An applicant may be admitted to the master's degree program for graduate study 
on a provisional basis if (1) he/she earned his/her baccalaureate degree from a 
non-accredited institution or (2) the record of his/her undergraduate preparation 
reveals deficiencies that can be removed near the beginning of his/her graduate 
study. A student admitted provisionally may be required to pass examinations to 
demonstrate his/her knowledge in specified areas, to take specified undergraduate 
courses to improve his/her background, or to demonstrate his/her competence for 
graduate work by earning no grades below "B" in his/her first nine hours of graduate 
work at this institution. 

Special Students 

Students not seeking a master's degree at A. and T. may be admitted in order to 
take courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificate if said 
students meet standard School of Graduate Studies entrance requirements. If a 
student subsequently wishes to pursue a degree program, he/she must request an 
evaluation of his/her record. The School of Graduate Studies reserves the right to 
refuse to accept towards a degree program credits which the candidate earned while 
enrolled as a special student; in no circumstances may the student apply towards a 
degree program more than twelve semester hours earned as a special student. 

ADMISSION TO DOCTORAL PROGRAMS 

Applicants to doctoral programs in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering must 
submit completed application forms with two official transcripts of previous under- 
graduate and graduate studies. Other admission criteria are outlined below under 
the following headings: unconditional admission, provisional admission, and gradu- 
ate unclassified. 

Unconditional Admission 

Unconditional admission is offered to applicants who satisfy all general School of 
Graduate Studies requirements. In addition, they must have an earned Bachelor of 

18 



Science and Master of Science in Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering 
or related discipline and a 3.5 grade-point average on their Master of Science 
program. Graduate Record Examination scores are required. Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required for international students. 

Provisional Admission 

Provisional admission is offered to applicants who meet all conditions except the 
3.5 grade-point average on the Master of Science degree. Provisional students must 
convert to unconditional admission on a timely basis by achieving a 3.5 average on 
graduate coursework when the ninth credit is completed. 

Graduate Unclassified 

Graduate unclassified is for non-degree seeking students. No more than 12 credits 
may be earned in this status. 

STANDARDIZED TESTS 

Scores from one or more standardized test may be used to qualify for admission to 
graduate programs. Applicants should consult the appropriate sections of the Grad- 
uate Bulletin for specific test requirements. 

APPLICATION 

Complete applications include completed application forms, two official trans- 
cripts of all prior academic work, letters of recommendation or reference forms, 
appropriate standardized test scores, statement of residence, and application fee of 
$25. Application forms may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies, Room 
120 Gibbs Hall, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411. 

Because of processing requirements, *an admission decision for Fall Semester 
cannot be guaranteed unless all credentials are received before July 1, for Spring 
Semester by November 1, and for Summer Session by April 1. 

Students applying for the doctoral programs in Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineering must submit their applications for the Fall Semester by April 15 and 
for the Spring Semester by October 15. Early application is encouraged, particu- 
larly if application for an assistantship is contemplated. 

Exceptions to the above statements must be approved by the Dean of the School of 
Graduate Studies. 

HOUSING 

The university maintains eleven residence halls for women and three for men. A 
request for dormitory housing accommodation should be directed to the Dean of 
Students at least sixty days prior to the expected date of registration. 

FOOD SERVICES 

The university provides food service for students at minimum cost. A cafeteria and 
a snack bar are operated at convenient locations on the campus. Students who live in 
the residence halls are required to eat in the cafeteria. 

IMMUNIZATION INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

North Carolina state law requires that all new graduate students entering college 
must have certain required immunizations. Immunization records must be kept on 
file at the college. Students taking both day and night classes are required to present 
proof of immunization. STUDENTS ENROLLED IN FOUR SEMESTER HOURS 
OR LESS AND RESIDING OFF CAMPUS ARE EXEMPT FROM THIS LAW. 
STUDENTS ATTENDING NIGHT CLASSES, WEEKEND CLASSES, OR OFF- 

19 



CAMPUS COURSES ONLY ARE ALSO EXEMPT. GRADUATE STUDENTS 
ARE NOT REQUIRED TO HAVE A PHYSICAL EXAMINATION. For new 
students who have been accepted, an appropriate form is mailed to them with an 
explanation of this requirement. Completed forms are returned to: 

University Physician 

Sebastian Infirmary 

North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Greensboro, N. C. 27411 



DRUG EDUCATION POLICY 
PREAMBLE: 

The basic mission of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
is to provide an educational environment that enhances and supports the intellectual 
process. The academic community, including students, faculty and staff have the 
collective responsibility to ensure that this environment is conducive to healthy 
intellectual growth. The illegal use of harmful and addictive chemical substances 
poses a threat to the educational environment. Thus, this Drug Education Policy is 
being promulgated to assist members of the University community in their under- 
standing of the harmful effects of illegal drugs; the incompatibility of illegal drugs 
with the educational mission of the University and the consequences of the use, 
possession or sale of such illegal drugs. 

OBJECTIVES: 

I. To develop an educational program that increases the University community's 
knowledge and competency to make informed decisions relative to the use and 
abuse of controlled substances 

II. To increase those skills and attributes required to take corrective action condu- 
cive to the health and well-being of potential drug abusers. 

PROGRAM COMPONENTS: 

I. Education 
II. Rehabilitation 
III. Sanctions 

EDUCATION 

It is the intent of the Drug Education Policy of North Carolina A&T State Univer- 
sity to insure that all members of the University community (i.e. students, faculty, 
administrators and other employees) are aware that the use, sale and/or possession of 
illegal drugs are incompatible with the goals of the University. Moreover, each 
person should be aware that the use, sale or possession of illegal drugs is, as more 
specifically set forth later in this policy, subject to specific sanctions and penalties. 

Each member of the University family is reminded that in addition to being 
subject to University regulations and sanctions regarding illegal drugs, they are also 
subject to the laws of the State and of the nation as they pertain to such drugs. Each 
individual is also reminded that it is not a violation of "double jeopardy" to be subject 
to the terms of this policy as well as the provisions of the North Carolina General 
Statutes. For a complete listing of relevant State criminal statutes please consult the 
Office of the University Attorney or the Office of Student Affairs. 

From a medical perspective you are reminded also that illegal drug usage, in 
addition to being habit forming or addictive, can and may cause damage to the body. 

Furthermore, each member of the University community is asked to pay particu- 
lar attention to the full consequences of the sanctions specified in this policy as well as 



20 



the consequences of the North Carolina criminal law referenced above. Certain 
violations may jeopardize an individual's future as it relates to continued University 
enrollment or future employment possibilities, depending on individual circum- 
stances. 

It is further a policy of the University that the educatioal, legal and medical 
aspects of this issue will be emphasized on an annual basis through the providing of 
programs and activities in the following areas: 

(a) Annual Drug and Alcohol Education Week— Workshops and seminars on drug 
abuse led by former drug addicts and community agencies such as MADD, 
SADD, and Drug Action Council; 

(b) Drug Awareness Fair; 

(c) Media presentations emphasizing the most current programs with drug edu- 
cation messages; 

(d) Exhibits featuring drug related paraphernalia; 

(e) Sixty (60) second radio spots on University radio station, WNAA, on drug 
abuse education; 

(f) Publication of brochure on drug education; 

(g) Continuous monthly outreach programs in each residence hall. 

Although directed primarily to the student population, the above noted educa- 
tional programs shall also be open to participation by all categories of University 
employees. 

Additionally, the Staff Development Office is the designated University depart- 
ment responsible for the planning and implementation of drug education programs 
geared toward the special needs of the faculty and staff. Among the programs to be 
implemented by the Staff Development Office include lunch time seminars jointly 
conducted by the Drug Action Council, Greensboro Police Department and the 
Guilford County Mental Health Department. 

REHABILITATION 

The University recognizes that rehabilitation is an integral part of an effective 
drug policy. Consistent with its commitment in the areas of education and sanctions, 
it is the University's intent to provide an opportunity for rehabilitation to all 
members of the University family. This commitment is evidenced through access to 
existing University resources and is furthered by referrals to community agencies. 

STUDENTS: 

The University Counseling Center and the Student Health Center are available to 
provide medical and psychological assessments of students with drug dependency 
problems. Based on the outcome of this assessment, treatment can be provided by 
either or both of these centers. If, however, the scope of the problem is beyond the 
capability of these Centers, affected students will be referred to community agencies 
such as Guilford County Mental Health Center and the Drug Action Council. The cost 
of such services shall be the individual's Responsibility. 

EMPLOYEES: 

The Services of the Counseling and Health Centers are not normally utilized by 
faculty and staff members except in emergency situations. This will also hold true 
for employees with drug related problems. If these problems are of an emergency 
nature, services will be made available to affected employees. Otherwise, referrals to 
local community agencies will be made available. The cost of such services will be the 
individual's responsibility. 



21 



SANCTIONS 

All members of the University community have the responsibility for being 
knowledgeable about and in compliance with the provisions of North Carolina Law 
as it relates to the use, possession or sale of illegal drugs as set forth in Article 5, 
Chapter 90 of the North Carolina General Statutes. Any violations of this law by 
members of the University family subjects the individual to prosecution both by the 
University disciplinary proceedings and by the civil authorities. It is not a violation 
of "double jeopardy" to be prosecuted by both of these authorities. The University 
will initiate its own disciplinary proceedings against a student, faculty member, 
administrator or other employee when the alleged conduct is deemed to affect the 
interests of the University. 

Penalties will be imposed by the University in compliance with procedural safe- 
guards applicable to disciplinary actions against students (see the Student Hand- 
book), faculty members (see the Faculty Handbook), administrators (see the Board of 
Governors Policies Concerning Senior Administrative Officers as well as the EPA 
Non-Teaching Personnel Policies) and SPA employees (see State Personnel Commis- 
sion Personnel Policies). 

The penalties imposed for such violations range from written warnings with 
probationary status to expulsion from enrollment and discharges from employment. 
However, minimum penalties that apply for each violation follow: 

a. Trafficking in Illegal Drugs 

(1) For the illegal manufacture, sale, delivery, or possession with intent to 
manufacture, sell or deliver, of any controlled substance identified in Sche- 
dule I, N. C. General Statutes 90-89, or Schedule II, N. C. General Statutes 
90-90 (including, but not limited to, heroin, mescaline, lysergic acid diethy- 
lamide, opium, cocaine, amphetamine, methaqualone), any student shall be 
expelled and any faculty member, administrator or other employee shall be 
discharged. 

(2) For a first offense involving the illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or 
possession with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver, of any controlled 
substance identified in Schedules III through VI, N. C. General Statutes 
90-91 through 90-94, (including, but not limited to, marijuana, pentobarbi- 
tal, codeine) the minimum penalty shall be suspension from enrollment or 
from employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent. For 
a second offense, any student shall be expelled and any faculty member, 
administrator, or other employee shall be discharged. 

b. Illegal Possession of Drugs 

(1) For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled sub- 
stance identified in Schedule I, N. C. General Statutes 90-89, or Schedule II, 
N. C. General Statutes 90-90, the minimum penalty shall be suspension 
from enrollment or from employment for a period of at least one semester or 
its equivalent. 

(2) For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled sub- 
stance identified in Schedule III through VI, N. C. General Staregular drug 
testing, and accept such other conditions and restrictions, including a pro- 
gram of community service, as the Chancellor or the Chancellor's designee 
deems appropriate. Refusal or failure to abide by the terms of probation 
shall result in suspension from enrollment or employment for any unex- 
pired balance of the prescribed period of probation. 

(3) For second or other subsequent offenses involving the illegal possession of 
controlled substances, progressively more severe penalties shall be im- 
posed, including expulsion of students and discharge of faculty members, 
administrators or other employees. 



22 



It should be noted that where the relevant sanction dictates a minimum of one 
semester suspension from employment, the regulations of the State Personnel Com- 
mission (as pertaining to SPA employees) do not permit suspension from employ- 
ment of this duration. Thus, such sanction as applied to SPA employees dictates the 
termination of employment. 

SUSPENSION PENDING FINAL DISPOSITION 

The University reserves the right through the Chancellor or his designee to sus- 
pend a student, faculty member, administrator and other employees between the 
time of the initiation of charges and the hearing to be held. Such decision will be 
made based on whether the person's continued presence within the University 
community will constitute a clear and immediate danger or disruption to the Uni- 
versity. In such circumstances the hearing will be held as promptly as possible. 

CONCLUSION 

A&T State University recognizes that the use of illegal drugs is a national problem 
and that sustained efforts must be made to educate the University family regarding 
the consequences associated with drug abuse. The primary emphasis in this policy 
has therefore been on providing drug counseling and rehabilitation services through 
the various programs and activities outlined above. 

Past experience suggests that most members of the University family are law 
abiding and will use this policy as a guide for their future behaviors and as a 
mechanism to influence their peers and colleagues in a positive direction. However, 
those who choose to violate any portions of this policy will pay the penalty for 
non-compliance. The main thrust of this policy has been to achieve a balance between 
its educational and punitive components. 

The effective implementation of this policy rests on its wide dissemination to all 
members of the University family. This will be accomplished through its publication 
in the faculty handbook, student handbook and University catalogue. Additionally, 
all affected individuals will be assured that applicable professional standards of 
confidentiality will be maintained at all times. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a 
student is a resident or a nonresident for tuition purposes. Each student must make a 
statement as to the length of his or her residence in North Carolina, with assessment 
by the institution of that statement to be conditioned by the following. 

Residence. To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become a 
legal resident and remain a legal resident for at least twelve months immediately 
prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence and 
residence for tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months legal residence means 
more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular it means maintaining a 
domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "maintaining a mere 
temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment in an institution of higher 
education." The burden of establishing facts which justify classification of a student 
as a resident entitled to in-state tuition rates is on the applicant for such classifica- 
tion, who must show his or her entitlement by the preponderance (the greater part) of 
the residentiary information. 

Initiative. Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the 
student's seeking such status and providing all information that the institution may 
require in making the determination. 



23 



Parents' Domicile. If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or 
court- appointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such parent(s) or guardian is, 
prima facie, the domicile of the individual; but this prima facie evidence of the 
individual's domicile may or may not be sustained by other information. Further, 
nondomiciliary status of parents is not deemed prima facie evidence of the applicant 
child's status if the applicant has lived (though not necessarily legally resided) in 
North Carolina for the five years preceding enrollment or re-registration. 

Effect of Marriage. Marriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming or 
continuing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage in any circum- 
stance insure that a person will become or continue to be a resident for tuition 
purposes. Marriage and the legal residence of one's spouse are, however, relevant 
information in determining residentiary intent. Furthermore, if both a husband and 
his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if one of them has been a legal 
resident longer than the other, then the longer duration may be claimed by either 
spouse in meeting the twelve-month requirement for in-state tuition status. 

Military Personnel. A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the armed 
forces does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason of such service. And 
students from the military may prove retention or establishment of residence by 
reference, as in other cases, to residentiary acts accompanied by residentiary intent. 

In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate benefits to 
certain military personnel and their dependents even though not qualifying for the 
in-state tuition rate by reason of twelve months legal residence in North Carolina. 
Members of the armed services, while stationed in and concurrently living in North 
Carolina, may be charged a tuition rate lower than the out-of-state tuition rate to the 
extent that the total of entitlements for application tuition costs available from the 
federal government, plus certain amounts based under a statutory formula upon the 
in-state tuition rate, is a sum less than the out-of-state tuition rate for the pertinent 
enrollment. A dependent relative of a service member stationed in North Carolina is 
eligible to be charged the in-state tuition rate while the dependent relative is living in 
North Carolina with the service member and if the dependent relative has met any 
requirement of the Selective Service System applicable to the dependent relative. 
These tuition benefits may be enjoyed only if the applicable requirements for admis- 
sion have been met; these benefits alone do not provide the basis for receiving those 
derivative benefits under the provisions of the residence classification statute 
reviewed elsewhere in the summary. 

Grade Period. If a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has conse- 
quently been classified a resident for tuition purposes, and (3) has subsequently lost 
North Carolina legal residence while enrolled at a public institution of higher 
education, that person may continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for a grace 
period of twelve months measured from the date on which North Carolina legal 
residence was lost. If the twelve months ends during an academic term for which the 
person is enrolled at a State institution of higher education, the grace period extends, 
in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one who continues 
domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of legal residence 
marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors. Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of their 
parents, but certain special cases are recognized by the residence classification 
statute in determining residence for tuition purposes. 

(a) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North 
Carolina for the time period(s) that either parent, as a North Carolina legal resident, 
may claim and does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other law or judicial 
act assigns the minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor thus deemed to be a 
legal resident will not, upon achieving majority before enrolling at an institution of 
higher education, lose North Carolina legal residence if that person (1) upon becom- 
ing an adult "acts, to the extent that the person's degree of actual emancipation 



24 



permits, in a manner consistent with bona fide legal residence in North Carolina" 
and (2) "begins enrollment at an institution of higher education not later than the fall 
academic term following completion of education prerequisite to admission at such 
institution." 

(b) If a minor has lived for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other than 
parents) who are domiciled in North Carolina and if the relatives have functioned 
during this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be deemed a 
resident for tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing immediately after at 
least five years in which these circumstances have existed. If under this considera- 
tion a minor is deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes immediately prior to his 
or her eighteenth birthday, that person on achieving majority will be deemed a legal 
resident of North Carolina of at least twelve months duration. This provision acts to 
confer in-state tuition status even in the face of other provisions of law to the contrary; 
however, a person deemed a resident of twelve months duration pursuant to this 
provision continues to be a legal resident of the State only so long as he or she does not 
abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile. If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates from an 
institution of higher education while classified a resident for tuition purposes and 
then both abandons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within a 12-month 
period, that person, if he or she continues to maintain the reacquired domicile into 
re-enrollment at an institution of higher education, may re-enroll at the in-state 
tuition rate without having to meet the usual twelve-month durational requirement. 
However, any one person may receive the benefit of the provision only once. 

Change of Status. A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or 
permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program which 
involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admitting 
institution either as a resident or as a nonresident for tuition purposes prior to actual 
enrollment. A residence status classification once assigned (and finalized pursuant 
to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter (with corresponding 
change in billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with the established primary 
divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students. When a student transfers from one North Carolina public 
institution of higher education to another, he or she is treated as a new student by the 
institition to which he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial residence 
status classification for tuition purposes. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Graduate Assistants 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified individuals. 
The student is assigned to assist a professor or a department fifteen hours per week 
for the duration of the assistantship. Some graduate assistants are assigned to teach 
freshman classes. Normally, a graduate assistant will be assigned to teach only one 
class per semester, but he/she may be assigned to teach a maximum of two. The 
assistantship offers a stipend that will assist a student to pay required tuition, fees, 
books, board, and lodging. Application for an assistantship must be made to the Dean 
of the School of Graduate Studies at least five months before fall registration. Only 
full-time graduate students are eligible. 

Other Assistance 

Funds, such as the National Direct Student Loan Fund, are vailable in limited 
quantity for students. Requests for information concerning these funds should be 
directed to the School of Graduate Studies. The newest kind of financial assistance 
available is the Minority Presence Grant. Under the Board of Governors General 



Minority Presence Grant Program, white students may be eligible for special finan- 
cial assistance if they are residents of North Carolina, enrolled for at least three 
hours of degree-credit coursework, and demonstrate financial need. 

EXPENSES 

The fee charged to a full-time student carrying nine or more semester hours of 
work are the same as those charged to full-time undergraduate students. For one 
academic year, a state resident should expect to pay approximately $1,431.00 which 
will cover tuition and course fees; this sum does not include room and board charges. 
Tuition and course fees for an out-of-state student carrying a full schedule will total 
$7,915.00 for the academic year. Current room and board rates are $1,565.00 per 
semester. 

As student fees are subject to change without prior notice, it is suggested that the 
Cashier's Office be consulted for complete information concerning charges for full 
and part-time students. 

Special Fees 

Fee for processing application 
(required only for first application for graduate studies) $25.00 

Late Registration 20.00 

Graduation fees: 

Diploma 15.00 

Regalia 20.00 

Transcript 2.00 

Master's Thesis binding fee 25.00 

Auditing 

To audit a course, a student must obtain permission from the Dean of the School of 
Graduate Studies and must submit the necessary forms during the registration 
period. A part-time student must pay all fees, including tuition, that would be 
charged to a student taking the course for credit. A full-time student is not required 
to pay any additional fees for auditing. A change from "credit" registration to "audit" 
will not be permitted after the close of the deadline date for withdrawing from a 
course. An auditor is not required to participate in class discussions, prepare 
assignments, or take examinations. 

SCHEDULE OF DEADLINES 

The School of Graduate Studies provides schedules of specific dates for completing 
various requirements for a degree program. These notices are not sent to the individ- 
ual automatically, but may be found in the calendar of the School of Graduate 
Studies, available upon request. 

REQUEST FOR GRADE REPORTS AND TRANSCRIPTS 

The Office of Registration and Records is the official record keeping office at the 
university. Requests for official statements regarding courses completed, grade 
reports, or transcripts should be directed to that office. 

REQUEST FOR GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Course descriptions are available upon request from the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

26 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 
ADVISING 

Until he/she is assigned to an advisor after he/she has been accepted as a candidate 
in a degree program, a graduate student is advised by a member of the graduate 
faculty appointed by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. The student, 
however, should consult and follow the curriculum guide prepared for his/her area of 
concentration. Separate curriculum guide sheets are available in the office of the 
department offering the concentration. They may be secured also from the School of 
Graduate Studies Office. 

"Special" students are advised by members of the graduate faculty appointed by 
the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 



CLASS LOADS 

Full-Time Students 

Class loads for the full-time student may range from 9 to 15 semester hours during 
a regular session of the academic year. The maximum load is 15 semester hours. 

In-Service Teachers 

The maximum load for a fully employed in-service teacher must not exceed six 
semester hours during any academic year. 

University Staff 

The maximum load for any fully employed member of the university faculty or 
staff will be six semester hours for the academic year. 



CONCURRENT REGISTRATION IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

A student registered in a degree program in this School of Graduate Studies may 
not enroll concurrently in another graduate school except upon permission, secured 
in advance, from the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 



GRADING SYSTEM 

Grades for graduate students are recorded as follows: A, excellent; B, average; C, 
below average; F, failure; S, work in progress (for courses in research); I, INCOM- 
PLETE; W, withdrawal. 

1. In order to earn a degree, a student must have a cumulative average of "B" (a 
grade point average of 3.0 on a system in which 1 hour of A earns 4 grade points). 

2. A graduate student automatically goes on probation when his/her cumulative 
average falls below "B." 

3. A student may be dropped from the degree program if he/she has not been 
removed from probation after two successive terms as a full-time student. 

4. A student may not repeat a required course in which "C" or above was earned. 

5. A student may repeat a required course in which "F" was earned. A student may 
not repeat the course more than once. If a student fails a second time, he/she is 
dismissed from the degree program. 

6. All hours attempted in graduate courses and all grade points earned are 
included in the computation of the cumulative average of a graduate student. 

7. A student who stops attending a course but fails to withdraw officially may be 
assigned a grade of "F." 

27 



8. All grades of "I" must be removed during the student's next term of enrollment. 

9. A student may not count towards a degree program any course in which a grade 
of "F" was earned. 

Note: The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction does not accept 
courses in which a student has received a "D" or "F" for renewal of certification. 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
FOR CLASS A TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

In all graduate degree programs except those leading to professional non-teaching 
specialties, the advanced education student at A. and T. State University must hold a 
Class A Certificate before being admitted to candidacy. 

To provide the professional education component for the student who enters grad- 
uate studies without the required credits in courses in education and who is pursuing 
a teaching program for the secondary school level, the following program of 24 
semester hours is offered: CUIN 625, CUIN 400 (Psychological Foundations of 
Education), HDSV 600 and the Student Teaching Block; CUIN 500 (Principles and 
Curricula of Secondary Schools, the appropriate subject methods course, CUIN 624 
and CUIN 560 (Observation and Student Teaching). 

Students who have earned some but not enough undergraduate credits in educa- 
tion and students without "A" certificates who are seeking graduate degrees in 
elementary education (Kindergarten - grade 6) should consult with the chairperson 
of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction to work out programs to meet 
certification requirements. 

Students may enter the graduate program in the Technology Education area or 
Department without a Class A Certificate. If Class G certification is sought, then 
students must consult with the graduate coordinator of the Technology Education 
Department to work out programs to meet Class A and/or Class G certifications. 
Students may be required to take undergraduate courses in education and technical 
options to fulfill certification requirements. If Class A and/or Class G certifications 
are not sought, then consultation with the graduate coordinator to determine the 
appropriate course work is required. A student may successfully complete a Master's 
degree from the Technology Education Department without being required to meet 
state certification requirements for the Class A or Class G certificate. 

While taking undergraduate courses in education and psychology (CUIN or 
HDSV) to meet certification requirements, a student may enroll in graduate level 
courses in his subject matter area of concentration if he or she has completed the 
undergraduate requirements in that area. 



SUBJECT-MATTER REQUIREMENTS FOR 
CLASS A TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

If a student has not completed sufficient undergraduate courses in a subject 
matter field to hold a Class A certificate in that subject, he should consult with the 
chairperson of the department offering that concentration. Together, they must 
work out a program to satisfy the undergraduate deficiencies by means of under- 
graduate courses or courses open to undergraduates and graduates. 



28 



REGULATIONS FOR A MASTERS DEGREE 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR A DEGREE 

Admission to graduate studies does not guarantee admission to candidacy for a 
degree. In order to be qualified as a candidate for a master's degree, a student must 
have a minimum overall average of 3.0 in at least nine semester hours of graduate 
work at A. and T., must have removed all deficiencies resulting from undergraduate 
preparation, and must have passed the Qualifying Essay. Some departments require 
additional qualifying examinations. 

In order to be classified as a candidate for a Master of Science in Engineering 
degree, a student must have a minimum overall average of 3.0 in at least nine 
semester hours of approved graduate work at A. and T. and must have removed all 
deficiencies resulting from undergraduate preparation. 

The following is the procedure for securing admission to candidacy: 

1. The student secures application forms for admission to candidacy from the 
Graduate Office, fills them out, and returns them to that office. This step should 
be taken as soon as possible after the student has decided upon a degree 
program. 

2. The Graduate Office processes the application, notifies the student of the action, 
and informs him/her of the time when the Qualifying Essay will next be 
administered. 

3. The student may take the Qualifying Essay during the first term of residence in 
graduate studies. If a student fails the Qualifying Essay, he/she may take it a 
second time. After a second failure the student must enroll in a prescribed 
English composition course (English 300 for 621) at this university and must 
earn a grade of "C" or above. 

4. The Graduate Office informs the student of any qualifying examinations 
required by the department in which he is concentrating his studies. 

5. After the student has completed at least nine semester hours of graduate study 
at the college, he/she becomes eligible for admission to candidacy. If, at that 
time, he/she has maintained an average of 3.0 in graduate studies, has passed 
the Qualifying Essay and all departmental qualifying examinations, the Grad- 
uate School informs the student that he/she has been admitted to candidacy and 
assigns him/her to an advisor in his/her field of concentration. 

In order to be eligible for graduation during a term, a student must have been 
admitted to candidacy no less than fifteen days prior to the deadline for filing for 
graduation during that term. 



CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

The minimum credit requirements for a master's degree are thirty semester hours 
for students in thesis and non-thesis programs. It is expected that a student can 
complete a program by studying full-time for an academic year and one additional 
summer term or by studying full-time during four nine-week summer sessions. 

The minimum credit requirements for a Master of Science in Engineering are 
thirty semester hours for students who elect to take the thesis option and thirty-three 
semester hours for students who take the non-thesis option. 



29 



RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of three-fourths of the hours required for the master's degree must be 
earned in residence study at the university. 



THE PLAN OF STUDY 

The master's degree candidate must submit a Plan of Study during the term in 
which the candidate will complete 15 or more credits toward the degree sought. If the 
15 credits will be completed at the end of a regular semester, the Plan of Study must 
be submitted five working days before registration for the following semester. If the 
15 credits will be completed at the end of the summer session, the Plan of Study 
should be filed within five working days following fall registration. The Plan of 
Study shows committee chairperson, other committee members and a sequential line 
of courses approved by the student's advisor. Each committee member's signature on 
the Plan of Study indicates approval for the Plan of Study. Upon approval by the 
School of Graduate Studies the Plan becomes the student's official guide to complet- 
ing his/her program. Any changes in the Plan of Study or exceptions to the schedule 
for submission of the Plan must be approved by the committee and the Dean of the 
School of Graduate Studies. 



DECLARATION OF MAJOR 

A graduate student shall declare and complete the requirements of one master's 
degree program before declaring another major. This does not prevent a student 
from changing a declaration of major. 



TIME LIMITATION 

The master's degree program must be completed within six successive calendar 
years. Programs remaining incomplete after this time interval are subject to cancel- 
lation, revision, or special examination for out-dated work. Students enrolled in 
doctoral programs (Electrical and Mechanical Engineering) should see the appro- 
priate section of the Graduate Bulletin for details regarding the maximum time 
allowed to complete the degree programs. 

When the program of study is interrupted because the student has been drafted 
into the armed services, the time limit shall be extended for the length of time the 
student shall have been on active duty, if the candidate resumes graduate work no 
later than one year following his/her release from military service. 



COURSE LEVELS 

At the University, six-digit numbers are used to designate all course offerings. The 
last three digits indicate the classification level of the course. Courses numbered 600 
through 699 are open to seniors and to graduate students. Courses numbered 700 and 
above are open only to graduate students. At least fifty percent of the courses counted 
in the work towards a master's degree must be those open only to graduate students; 
that is, numbered 700 and above. 



30 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred from 
another graduate institution if ( 1) the work is acceptable as credit toward a compar- 
able degree at the institution from which transfer is sought, and (2) the courses to be 
transferred are approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

To request a transfer of credit, the student must complete an application in the 
School of Graduate Studies Office. It will be the applicant's responsibility to request 
from the appropriate institution(s) a statement certifying that the work is acceptable 
as credit toward a comparable degree. The transcript should then be sent to the 
School of Graduate Studies Office of A. and T. State University. 



FINAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

During the semester the candidate expects to complete all work for the master's 
degree, the candidate should file in the Graduate Office an application for the 
comprehensive examination at least 45 days in advance of the scheduled exami- 
nation. 

1. All master's degree students (except Engineering) are required to pass a writ- 
ten comprehensive examination in their area of speciality. 

2. Students pursuing a degree of M.S. in Education, subject-matter oriented, will 
take a comprehensive examination in two parts, subject-matter and profes- 
sional education. The evaluation will be made by the faculties in the respective 
areas. 

3. If a student fails a comprehensive examination twice, he/she must petition for a 
third examination. The petition is reviewed by a committee from the student's 
major concentration. A student who fails a third time is dismissed from the 
degree program. 

4. Comprehensive examinations are to be scheduled by the departments, with the 
approval of the Graduate Office. A report of the student's performance must be 
submitted to the Graduate Office at least one month prior to Commencement. 



OPTIONS FOR DEGREE PROGRAM 

The student, in consultation with his/her advisor, selects the degree program to be 
followed. The advisor must notify the chairperson of the department of the program 
plan which the candidate prefers to follow. 

Graduate Advisement Committee 

The student selects his/her Graduate Advisement Committee. The Committee 
shall consist of the advisor and additional members to a total of three or five. One 
member should be a university faculty member from outside the student's major 
department. The Graduate Advisement Committee shall be responsible for approval 
of the Plan of Study and the Research Plan, inclusive of the thesis. The Graduate 
Advisement Committee must be approved by the Department and the School of 
Graduate Studies. 

Thesis Option 

In order for a student to pursue a thesis program, he/she must be recommended to 
the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies by his/her advisor and the chairperson of 
the department in which a student is concentrating his/her studies. The School of 



31 



Graduate Studies must then approve the student as a candidate. The thesis program 
consists of thirty semester hours including the thesis. After receiving written appro- 
val to follow the thesis option, the candidate shall prepare and present the thesis 
proposal to the advisor. Following acceptance of the proposal, the advisor must 
submit to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies an approved copy of the 
proposal in its final form. Individuals who have been granted the privilege of 
following the thesis option are expected to demonstrate research competencies and to 
prepare a scholarly account of resulting data. 

A copy of the thesis must be filed with the School of Graduate Studies six weeks 
before the end of the semester in which work is completed. An oral defense of the 
thesis is required and scheduled by the candidate's thesis advisor. An affirmative 
vote by a majority of the committee after the oral examination is necessary for the 
candidate to pass. 

The Research Plan 

Those students who choose a thesis option plan of study are required to submit their 
Thesis Research Plan which must be approved by the Graduate Advisement Com- 
mittee and filed with the School of Graduate Studies. Any changes in the Thesis 
Research Plan must be approved by the Committee and filed with the Dean of the 
School of Graduate Studies. 

Non-Thesis Option 

The non-thesis plan is offered to the candidate who may benefit more from a 
broader range of studies than from the preparation of a thesis. The program of study 
must consist of a minimum of 30 credit hours of prescribed courses. 

Individuals who are following this plan must demonstrate their ability to conduct 
and to report the results of original research by preparing a paper as a part of the 
course Special Problems or Research or Seminar in the appropriate area. 

Thesis Option [Master of Science in Engineering] 

In order for a student to pursue a thesis program, he/she must be recommended to 
the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies by the Dean of the College of Engineering. 
The School of Graduate Studies must then approve the student as a candidate. The 
thesis program consists of thirty semester hours including the thesis. After receiving 
written approval to follow the thesis option, the candidate shall prepare and present 
the thesis proposal to the chairperson of his/her Advisory Committee. Following 
acceptance of the proposal, an approved copy of the proposal in its final form must be 
submitted to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

The Non-Thesis Option [Master of Science in Engineering] 

The non-thesis plan is offered to the candidate who may benefit more from a 
broader range of studies than from the preparation of a thesis. The program of study 
must consist of a minimum of 33 credit hours of prescribed courses. 



MASTER'S THESIS AND FORMAT 

The following are regulations for a Master's thesis and the format of the thesis: 

1. A student writing a thesis must register for the course, Thesis, prior to the 
semester in which he/she expects to take the final examination. 

2. Three typewritten or word processed copies of the completed thesis must be 
submitted to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, together with two 
copies of an abstract of the thesis. The abstract should be 400 to 500 words. 



32 



Consult the School of Graduate Studies' calendar for deadline dates regarding 
submission of these manuscripts. 
3. Additional information concerning the format is available in the School of 
Graduate Studies Office. 



APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

A candidate for graduation must file an application for graduation at least 30 days 
prior to the close of the session in which he/she expects to complete the requirements 
for the degree. A student secures the application forms from his/her advisor, who 
must approve the application before it is sent to the School of Graduate Studies 
Office. Failure to meet the deadline may result in delay of graduation for the 
candidate. 



GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION 

The general test of the Graduate Record Examination is required for admission or 
as part of the completion requirements for some programs. When it is required, the 
GRE must have been taken within the last five years. Applicants must request the 
testing service to forward the results to the School of Graduate Studies. The follow- 
ing departments require the GRE as part of the completion requirements: Agricul- 
tural Education, Animal Science, Art, Biology, Chemistry, Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion, Educational Leadership and Policy, History, Human Environment and Family 
Sciences, Physical Education, Mathematics, and Natural Resources and Environ- 
mental Design (formerly Plant Science and Technology). Applicants should check 
the individual departments in the appropriate section of the Graduate Bulletin to 
determine specific requirements. 



SECOND MASTER'S DEGREE 

The School of Graduate Studies of North Carolina A. and T. State University 
provides an opportunity for a student holding a master's degree to earn a second 
master's degree in another discipline or specialty. To be admitted for a second 
master's degree, the student files the appropriate admission application, submits 
transcripts and provides pertinent examination scores. 

During the first semester, the student makes application for candidacy. In the last 
semester of courses, the student files for the comprehensive examination in the new 
specialty. In collaboration with the advisor, the student plans the new program to 
include a minimum of 18 semester hours in the new specialty to be taken in the 
University. Twelve hours will be accepted from the first master's providing that 
degree was completed at North Carolina A. and T. State University. If the student is 
a transfer student, twenty-four hours must be completed in the new program since 
University regulations allow only six semester hours to be accepted in transfer 
credits. 

The student taking a second master's degree in a non-teaching field must fulfill the 
courses appropriate to that field. 



ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY CONCERNING CHANGES IN REQUIREMENTS 
FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Generally, a student is permitted to graduate according to the requirements 
specified either in the catalogue current during the year of his/her first application 



33 



for candidacy or in the catalogue current during the year of his/her application for 
graduation. If more than six years pass between the student's application for candi- 
dacy and his application for graduation, the university reserves the right to require 
the student to satisfy the regulations in effect at the time of his/her application for 
graduation. In all instances, the School of Graduate Studies reserves the right to 
require students in programs in Agricultural Education, Education, or Industrial 
Education to satisfy the requirements specified by the North Carolina Department 
of Public Instruction at the time of the student's completion of the requirements for 
the Master of Science degree. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Diplomas are awarded only at the commencement exercises following completion 
of all requirements for the degree. Attendance at Commencement is required of all 
graduating students unless individually excused by the Dean of the School of Gradu- 
ate Studies. 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS 

Additional rules, regulations, and standards for each of the areas of graduate 
study appear in the appropriate sections of the catalogue. The prospective student 
should read such sections with care. 

REGULATIONS FOR THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree (Ph.D.) is offered in Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineering. For details concerning admission to the program, see the section on 
"Admission and Other Information" elsewhere in this catalogue. Although 
general policies related to the Ph.D. program are listed below, the student should 
consult the respective departmental handbook for more details. 

Qualifying Examination 

This is a written examination required of all Ph.D. students scheduled each 
semester. The qualifying examination must be passed prior to the end of the third 
semester. Provisional students cannot sit for the qualifying examination. They must 
first gain a status change to unconditional admission. Consult the departmental 
handbook for details. 

Preliminary Examination 

The preliminary examination is given in the semester following completion of all 
required coursework. In this oral examination, the student is asked about graduate 
coursework and subject matter related to the specialization. It is also a presentation 
and defense of the proposed dissertation topic. Consult the departmental handbook 
for details. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Admission to candidacy is given once the student has completed and passed all 
parts of the preliminary examination. Consult the departmental handbook for 
details. 

Final Oral Examination 

The final oral is scheduled after the dissertation is complete. It consists of the 
defense of the methodology used and the conclusions reached in the research. Consult 
the departmental handbook for details. 

Residence Requirement and Doctor of Philosophy Time Limit 

Two residence credits must be earned. In addition, the doctoral student has a 
maximum of six calendar years from admission to attain candidacy and ten calendar 
years to complete all requirements. The thesis must be completed in five years after 
admission to candidacy. Consult the departmental handbook for details. 

34 



Credit Completion Requirements 

A minimum of 24 course credits and 12 dissertation credits beyond the Master of 
Science are required. Consult the departmental handbook for details. 

Interinstitutional Doctor of Philosophy Program 

North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina State University, and the 
University of North Carolina at Charlotte all participate in an interinstitutional 
Ph.D. program. Students seeking admission to such a cooperative program must 
satisfy all admission and degree requirements at the university where the Ph.D. will 
be issued as well as those of the student's home institution. Details are available at 
each of these departments. 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Alton Thompson, Chairperson 

Room 145, Carver Hall 

The department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology offers a program 
of study leading toward the Master of Science degree in Agricultural Economics. 
The program prepares students for careers in teaching, research, extension, 
agriculture-related business, and government service, as well as for further gradu- 
ate studies for a terminal degree. Students may select a program track for concen- 
tration in Agricultural Marketing, Production Economics or Rural Development. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours is required for the M.S. degree in Agricultural 
Economics, including 12 semester hours of "core" courses in advanced economic 
theory, a course in statistics and research methods, 9 semester hours of courses in the 
selected program track, 1 elective 3-hour course, and 6 semester hours of thesis work. 
In addition, the successful completion and defense of a thesis and a comprehensive 
examination are required. A GPA of 3.00 in Agricultural Economics courses is 
required for graduation. 

The general requirements for admission are an undergraduate degree from an 
accredited institution, with a grade point average of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and a basic 
preparation in Agricultural Economics, Economics, Mathematics and Statistics. An 
undergraduate major in Agricultural Economics, Economics, Agribusiness or Bus- 
iness Administration, with preparation in Economics/Statistics generally will pro- 
vide an acceptable preparation. Applicants who do not meet the requirements will be 
considered on an individual basis. Applicants are encouraged to provide GRE scores; 
however, these scores are not required for admission. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science degree in Agricultural Economics is 
required to complete a common core of courses consisting of: 
Ag. Econ 710 Advanced Microeconomics 3 Semester Hours 

Ag. Econ 720 Advanced Macroeconomics 3 Semester Hours 

Ag. Econ 705 Advanced Statistics 3 Semester Hours 

Ag. Econ 725 Research Methods 3 Semester Hours 

In addition, the following courses are required by areas of concentration as 
specified: 

Rural Development 

Core Courses 12 Semester Hours 

Ag. Econ 750 Social Organization of Agriculture 3 Semester Hours 

Ag. Econ 730 Rural Development 3 Semester Hours 

Ag. Econ 732 Agricultural Policy 3 Semester Hours 

Elective 3 Semester Hours 

Thesis 6 Semester Hours 

Total 30 Semester Hours 

Agricultural Marketing 

Core Courses 12 Semester Hours 

Ag. Econ. 734 Agricultural Marketing 3 Semester Hours 

35 



Ag. Econ. 736 
Ag. Econ. 756 
Elective 
Thesis 



Marketing Problems and Issues 
Agricultural Price Analysis 



Total 



Production Economics 

Core Courses 

Ag. Econ 740 Production Economics 

Ag. Econ 732 Agricultural Policy 

Ag. Econ 708 Econometrics 

Elective 

Thesis 



Total 



Semester Hours 
Semester Hours 
Semester Hours 
Semester Hours 
Semester Hours 



12 Semester 
3 Semester 
Semester 
Semester 
Semester 
Semester 



30 Semester 



Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 



William A. Amponsah, B.S., Berea College; M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., 

Ohio State University; Adjunct Assistant Professor. 
Godfrey Ejimakor, B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., North Carolina 

A&T State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University; Adjunct Assistant 

Professor. 
Robin G. Henning, B.S., M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Cornell University; 

Adjunct Assistant Professor. 
Donald R. McDowell, B.S., Southern A. & M. University; M.S., Ph.D., University of 

Illinois; Associate Professor. 
John P. Owens, B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State 

University; Adjunct Instructor. 
Richard D. Robbins, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University; Professor. 
Alton Thompson, B.S., North Carolina Central University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State 

University; Adjunct Associate Professor. 
Anthony K. Yeboah, B.S., University of Science and Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa 

State University; Associate Professor. 



COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 



Course Description 

AGEC-632. International Trade Policy 

AGEC-634. Commodity Marketing Problems 

AGEC-640. Agribusiness Management 

AGEC-641. Special Problems in Ag ribusiness Management 

AGEC-648. Appraisal and Finance of Agribusiness Firms 

AGEC-650. Human Resource Development 

AGEC-675. Computer Applications in Agriculture 

AGEC-705. Econometrics 

AGEC-705. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics 

AGEC-710. Microeconomics 

AGEC-720. Macroeconomics 

AGEC-725. Research Methods in Agricultural Economics 

AGEC-730. Rural Development 

AGEC-732. Agricultural Policy 

AGEC-734. Agricultural Marketing and Interregional Trade 

AGEC-735. Economic Development 

AGEC-736. Agricultural Marketing Problems and Issues 

AGEC-738. Theory of International Trade 

AGEC-740. Production Economics 

AGEC-750. Social Organization of Agriculture 

AGEC-756. Agricultural Price Analysis 

AGEC-799. Thesis Research 

36 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND EXTENSION 

Dr. Richard Robbins, Acting Chairperson 

Office: 242 Carver Hall 

The Department of Agricultural Education and Extension offers programs lead- 
ing to the Master of Science Degree. The programs are designed to meet the needs of 
individual students and emphasize the professional improvement of teachers and 
professional workers in related areas with education responsibilities. They provide 
advanced preparation for employment in administration, supervision, teacher edu- 
cation, and research in agricultural education and related fields. 

Degree Offered 

Agricultural Education — M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

Admission of students to the Master's Degree Program in Agricultural Education 
is based on the general admission requirements of the Graduate School. The candi- 
date must have a Baccalaureate Degree from an accredited undergraduate institu- 
tion. He/she must have a minimum of 18 credits in professional education or certifi- 
cation as a teacher of agricultural education or equivalent professional experiences. 
Failure to meet any of these criteria may necessitate rejection of the application or 
requirement of additional undergraduate work. 

Departmental Requirements 

A minimum of 33 semester hours are required for completion of the graduate 
degree. The degree is not conferred for a mere collection of credits. A well-balanced, 
unified, and complete program of study will be required. A student may meet the 
degree requirements by either full-time or part-time enrollment and by attendance 
in any combination of terms. 

The student may follow a thesis or non-thesis program. Those candidates who do 
not write a thesis must present a suitable investigative paper. Its nature and content 
will be determined by the department. 

Courses in the major and minor areas will be selected on the basis of the individ- 
ual's needs and interests. To qualify for the graduate certificate to teach in the public 
schools of North Carolina the candidate should complete 18 semester credits in 
subject-matter agriculture. The candidate may concentrate in one subject-matter 
area. 

Other requirements include: Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and 
Advanced Test in Education), 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses, and 
Final Comprehensive Examination in Agricultural Education. 
Career Opportunities 

The Graduate Program in Agricultural Education provides advanced preparation 
for employment in administration, supervision, teaching in schools and colleges, 
agricultural extension, business and industry, and research in agricultural educa- 
tion and related fields. 
Directory of Faculty and Courses 
Carey L. Ford, B.S. & M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Iowa State 

University; Associate Professor. 
Daniel M. Lyons, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State University; Agricultural Extension Faculty. 
Dalton H. McAfee, B.S., Alcorn State University; M.S., Tuskegee University; Ph.D., 

Ohio State University; Agricultural Extension Faculty. 
Larry D. Powers, B.S., M.S., Tuskegee University; Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity; Associate Professor. 
Francis 0. Walson, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic and State University; Adjunct Assistant Professor. 
Courses 

AGED-600 Youth Organization and Program Management 
AGED-601 Adult Education in Vocational and Extension Education 

37 



AGED-603 Problem Teaching in Vocational and Extension Education 

AGED-604 Public Relations in Agriculture 

AGED-605 Guidance and Group Instruction in Vocational Education 

AGED-606 Cooperative Work-Study Programs 

AGED-607 Environmental Education 

AGED-608 Agricultural Extension Organization and Methods 

AGED-609 Community Analysis and Rural Life 

AGED-610 International Education in Agriculture 

AGED-664 Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades 

AGED-665 Occupational Exploration in the Middle Grades— Agricultural Occupa- 
tions 

AGED-700 Seminar in Agricultural Education and Extension 

AGED-702 Methods and Techniques of Public Relations 

AGED-703 Scientific Methods in Research 

AGED-704 History and Philosophy of Vocational Education 

AGE D-705 Recent Developments and Trends in Agricultural Education and Exten- 
sion 

AGED-706 Comparative Education in Agriculture 

AGED-707 Issues in Community Development and Adult Education 

AGED-750 Community Problems 

AGED-752 Administration and Supervision 

AGED-753 Program Planning 

AGED-754 History of Agricultural Education 

AGED-760 Thesis Research in Agricultural Education 

ANIMAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

George A. Johnson, Chairperson 

Office: Room 101, Webb Hall 

The Department of Animal Science offers a program in Animal Health Science 
which emphasizes the effects of environmental factors upon animal growth and 
development, reproduction and disease resistance. Courses are designed to provide a 
solid foundation of fundamental biological and biochemical principles within the 
disciplines of breeding and genetics, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, physiology 
and toxicology. 

Objectives 

To advance scholarship and research in Animal Health and related disciplines; to 
increase the number of minority students with graduate training in Animal Health; 
to provide opportunities which would prepare students to enter Ph.D. and progres- 
sional degree programs; and, to increase the supply of individuals with biotechnolog- 
ical skills and training at the graduate level available to employers in the fields of 
science and biotechnology. 

Degree Offered 

Animal Health Science— M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

Admission of students to the graduate program and general program require- 
ments for enrolled students are based upon the requirements presented in the 
Graduate School Bulletin. 

Departmental Requirements 

A minimum of 30 credit hours, which includes thesis research, is required for 
completion of the graduate degree. 

The courses included in the curriculum are divived into a hierarchical structure- 
required courses, core elective and general electives. The required courses are 
fundamental to the program providing the student with an understanding of the 
relationships between environmental effects and biological disciplines on Animal 
Health (701), enhance communicative skills (702 and 703) and biostatistics. The 
required courses constitute 8 credit hours of the student's curriculum. Core electives 
38 



represent a pool of courses which are oriented toward the mission of the program. 
Students will be required to complete three courses (a minimum of 8 credit hours) 
from the pool of seven courses offered by the department specifically designed to 
meet needs in understanding Animal Health. An additional eight credit hours will 
be selected by the student and their graduate committee from a pool of courses which 
constitute supporting electives. These courses will compliment the needs of the 
student to fulfill their research obligation to the program. 

The six credit hours for thesis research will provide the student with recognition 
for the time spent conducting research. The research will culminate with the defense 
of the thesis. 

Career Opportunities 

Candidates for the Master of Science degree will be qualified for entry into the 
Ph.D. program areas of breeding and genetics, microbiology, nutrition, parasitol- 
ogy, cell pathobiology, physiology and toxicology and into other related disciplines 
and professional medical programs. Additionally, candidates will be qualified for 
employment in the field of biotechnology, allied health industries and laboratory 
animal science. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

Credit 
Course No. Title (Lec.-Lab.) 

ANSC-604 Administrative and Regulatory Policies Governing 

Animal Use 2(2-0) 

ANSC-611 Principles of Animal Nutrition 3(3-0) 

ANSC-613 Livestock and Meat Evaluation 2(1-2) 

ANSC-614 Animal Breeding 3(3-0) 

ANSC-615 Selection of Meat and Meat Products 3(2-2) 

ANSC-618 Seminar in Animal Science 1(1-0) 

ANSC-619 Special Problems in Livestock Management 3(3-0) 

ANSC-629 Special Problems in Dairy Management 3(3-0) 

ANSC-623 Molecular Animal Physiology 3(3-0) 

ANSC-624 Physiology of Reproduction in Vertebrate Species 3(3-0) 

ANSC-637 Environmental Toxicology 3(2-3) 

ANSC-641 Disease Management of Livestock and Poultry 3(3-0) 

ANSC-653 Laboratory Animal Management and Clinical 

Techniques 4(2-6) 

ANSC-657 Poultry Anatomy and Physiology 3(2-2) 

ANSC-659 Special Problems in Poultry 3(3-0) 

ANSC-660 Special Problems in Specimen Preparation, 

Immunological Techniques, Electron Microscopy, 

Radiosiotopes, Radiology or Histotechnology 3(1-6) 

Graduate 

ANSC-701 Environmental Topics and Animal Health 3(3-0) 

ANSC-702 Seminar in Animal Health I 1(1-0) 

ANSC-703 Seminar in Animal Health II 1(1-0) 

ANSC-708 Special Problems in Animal Health 2 

ANSC-712 Nutrition and Disease 3(3-0) 

ANSC-713 Advanced Livestock Production 3(2-2) 

ANSC-771 Advanced Design of Experiments 3(3-0) 

ANSC-782 Cellular Pathobiology 3(3-0) 

ANSC-799 Thesis Research in Animal Health Science 6 

ANIMAL SCIENCE FACULTY (RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTION) DIRECTORY 

John W. Allen, B.S., University of Georgia; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Caro- 
lina; Laboratory Animal Science Research Coordinator 

Doris G. Fultz, B.S. (Biology), Virginia Commonwealth University; B.S. (Animal 
Science), D.V.M., Tuskegee University; Associate Professor 

39 



Fields C. Gunsett, B.S., University of California; M.S., University of Idaho; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin; Associate Professor 
Tracy L. Hanner, B.S., North Carolina Central University; D.V.M., North Carolina 

State University; Laboratory Animal Science Coordinator 
Jill Henson-Upshaw, B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., D.V.M., Tuskegee University; 

Instructor 
George A. Johnson, M.S., Cornell University; D.V.M., Tuskegee Institute; Professor 

and Chairperson 
David W. Libby, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maine; Associate Professor 
Marion Ray McKinnie, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ohio State 

University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Extension/Research 

Specialist 
Derek C. Norford, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., North Carolina 

State University; D.V.M., Tuskegee University; Director, Laboratory Animal 

Resources Unit 
Lanell Ogden, B.S., Fort Valley State College; M.S., Oklahoma State University; 

Ph.D., Auburn University; D.V.M., Tuskegee Institute; Associate Professor 
Edward C. Segerson, B.S., M.S., Memphis State University; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State University; Associate Professor 
Linda M. Soler-Niedziela, B.S., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., West Virginia 

University; Assistant Professor 
Willie L. Willis, B.S., Fort Valley State College; M.S., Ph.D., Colorado State Univer- 
sity; Associate Professor 

Dairy Science 

ANSC-604 Dairy Seminar I (Formerly Dairy Husb. 2374) 
ANSC-605 Dairy Seminar II 



ART 

Timothy O. Hicks, Chairperson 

Office: Frazier Hall 

The Graduate School through the Department of Art prepares personnel at the 
graduate level by offering the Master's degree in Education with a concentration in 
art. Specifically the Department of Art seeks to prepare personnel by providing 
knowledge and competencies needed in planning, organizing, and supervising vari- 
ous aspects of the public school art program. 

Degrees Offered 

Art, Secondary Education — M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

The admission of students to the graduate program in the Department of Art is 
based upon general admission requirements of the University. 

Departmental Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
program in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the 
degree, Master of Science in Education with a concentration in art, must hold or be 
qualified to hold a "Class A" teaching certificate in art. The areas covered should be: 
painting, ceramics or sculpture, design, art history, and crafts. Each applicant for 
admission is required to submit a portfolio of his/her work. 

A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to satisfy these 
requirements by enrolling in appropriate undergraduate courses before beginning 
his/her graduate studies in art. 

40 



Requirements For The M.S. Degree in Education (Concentration in Art) 

Minimum requirements for the M.S. degree in Education with a concentration in 
art; 30 Semester Hours. 
I. Education — (6 Semester Hours) 

A. Education 701 (Philosophy of Education): 3 Semester Hours 

B. Education 722 (Curriculum in Secondary School): 3 Semester Hours 
II. Art — (9 Semester Hours) 

A. Art 720 (Methods of Criticism): 3 Semester Hours 

B. Art 721 (Research and Analysis): 3 Semester Hours 

C. Art 722 (Seminar in Art Education): 3 Semester Hours 
III. Other Requirements 

A. Electives (6 Semester Hours in Art, Education, or related fields) 

B. Additional 9 Semester Hours from: 

1. Art 603 — Studio Techniques — 3 Semester Hours 

2. Art 604 — Ceramics Workshop — 3 Semester Hours 

3. Art 605 — Printmaking — 3 Semester Hours 

4. Art 606 — Sculpture — 3 Semester Hours 

5. Art 607 — Project Seminar — 2 Semester Hours 

6. Art 608 — Arts and Crafts — 3 Semester Hours 

Career Opportunities 

The Department of Art prepares graduate students for careers in teaching, 
research, administration, and studio production in the visual arts. 

Directory of Faculty and Courses 

Yuheng Bao, B.A., Beijing Teacher's College; M.A., The Academy of Arts of China, 

Beijing; Ph.D., Ohio University; Assistant Professor. 
LeAnder Canady, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.F.A., University of 

North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor 
Timothy O. Hicks, B.S. and M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., The 

Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor and Chairperson 
Stephanie Santmyers, B.F.A., Alfred University; M.A., Illinois University; M.F.A., 

University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Associate Professor. 
Henry E. Sumpter, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.F. A., University 

of North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor. 

Courses 

ART-600 Public School Art 

ART-602 Seminar in Art History 

ART-603 Studio Techniques 

ART-604 Ceramics Workshops 

ART-605 Printmaking 

ART-606 Sculpture 

ART-607 Project Seminar 

ART-608 Arts and Crafts 

ART-720 Methods of Criticism, Interpretation, and Research 

ART-721 Research and Analysis 

ART-722 Seminar in Art Education 



41 



BIOLOGY 

Joseph Whittaker, Chairperson 

Office: 102 Barnes Hall 

The Department of Biology's program is designed to produce investigators and 
teachers who can define, experimentally research, and communicate fundamental 
problems associated with the development of biological systems. Further, the pro- 
gram of study leading to the Master's degree is designed to broaden the studies of 
biology majors who intend to pursue additional study at the graduate level. 

Degree Offered 

Biology — M.S. 

Biology — M.S., Secondary Education 

General Program Requirements 

The admission of students to the graduate degree programs in the Department of 
Biology is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

Departmental Requirements — Biology Major 

In addition to the general requirements specified below, a student wishing to be 
accepted as a candidate for the degree, Master of Science in Biology, must have 
completed, on the undergraduate level, chemistry through organic, calculus, or at 
least a math course containing some calculus, one year of physics, and a course in 
cellular or molecular biology. Some graduate students may be accepted with the 
provision that they complete some or all of these courses before acceptance to candi- 
dacy. The student is advised to read the Graduate Catalog very carefully for any 
additional Graduate School or departmental requirements. 

Required Courses (30 semester hours, including thesis research) 
Biology 663 Cytology (3) 

860 Parasitology (3) 

669 Recent Advanced in Cell Biology (3) 

743 Developmental Plant Morphology (3) 
Chemistry 651 General Biochemistry (5) 
Biology 701 Biology Seminar (1) 

702 Biology Seminar (1) 

862 Research in Botany (6) 
or 

863 Research in Zoology (6) 

Hours needed to complete the 30 semester hours required may be taken from the 
following courses: 
Biology 666 Experimental Embryology (3) 

742 Physiology of Vascular Plants (3) 

700 Environmental Biology (3) 

769 Cellular Physiology (4) 

861 Advanced Genetics (3) 

703 Experimental Methods in Biology (3) 

NOTE : On some occasions substitutions may be made in the second half of this list in 
order to meet specific needs and/or interests of the graduate student or department 
(reference full course list). 



42 



Other Requirements 

1. Filing for and completion of Qualifying Essay — (a requirement of the Graduate 
School) 

2. GRE (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Biology) Scores must be submitted to 
the Graduate School Office before admission to the final examination can be 
granted. 

3. Satisfactory completion of an examination in a foreign language 

4. One academic year of residence at A & T 

5. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

6. Participation in the Departmental Seminar Series 

7. Final comprehensive examination in .Biology 

8. Satisfactory presentation and defense of thesis 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR A MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 
(Pre-professional) 

FIRST YEAR 
First Semester Second Semester 

BIOL 669 Recent Adv. in Cell BIOL 663 Cytology (3) 

Biology (3) BIOL 860 Parasitology (3) 

BIOL 743 Dev. Plant Morphology (3) BIOL 702 BIOL Seminar (1) 

BIOL 701 BIOL Seminar (1) Chem. 651 General Biochem. (5) 

BIOL 703 Exp. Methods in 

Biology (3) 

Elective 

10 (+ elective) 12 

SECOND YEAR 

Summer or First Semester First Semester or Second Semester 

BIOL 862 Research in Botany (3) BIOL 862 Research in Botany (3) 

or or 

BIOL 863 Research in Zoology (3) BIOL 863 Research in Zoology (3) 

Elective (Optional) Elective (Optional) 

3 (+ elective) 3 (+ elective) 



Teaching Major in Biology 

In addition to the general requirements specified below, a student wishing to be 
accepted as a candidate for the degree, Master of Science in Education with concen- 
tration in Biology must have completed, on the undergraduate level, chemistry 
through organic, a math course which includes some calculus and one year of college 
physics. 



Required Courses, M.S. in Education, Concentration in Biology 
Required Courses in Biology: Non-thesis Option (30 semester hours) 
Biology 661 Mammalian Biology (3) 

662 Biology of Sex (3) 

663 Cytology (3) 

700 Environmental Biology (3) 



43 



765 Introductory Experimental Zoology (3) 

766 Invertebrate Biology/Elementary and Secondary School 
Teachers (3) 

NOTE: 760 Projects in Biology (3) and 

701/702 Seminar in Biology (2) may be substituted for Biology 766 
Six semester hours of electives in education, biology, or subjects related to biology. 

Required Courses in Biology: Thesis Option (20 Semester Hours) 
Biology 661 Mammalian Biology (3) 

662 Biology of Sex (3) 

663 Cytology (3) 

700 Environmental Biology (3) 

765 Introductory Experimental Zoology (3) 

862 Research in Botany (3) or 

863 Research in Zoology (3) 

Three hours of electives in Education, Biology, or related fields 
Thesis 

Required Courses in Education: Non-thesis Option (30 Semester Hours) 

1. Research 

2. The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process 

3. Current Critical Issues in American Education 

4. Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education 

5. Curriculum, Supervision, etc. 

Other Requirements 

1. Students in a non-thesis program may take either Education 790 (Seminar) or a 
seminar in the area of concentration. Students in a thesis program may take 
Education 791 (Thesis) or a thesis research course offered in the area of concen- 
tration. In all instances, the decision is to be made in consultation with the advisor. 

2. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in area of 
concentration). 

3. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

4. Final comprehensive examination in Education and area of concentration 

5. Must hold or be qualified to hold a Class A teaching certificate in Biology 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR A TEACHING MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

Non-Thesis 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

BIOL 661 Mammalian Bio. (3) BIOL 663 Cytology (3) 

BIOL 662 Biology of Sex (3) BIOL 765 Intro. Experiment. Zoo (3) 

BIOL 700 Environmental Bio. (3) BIOL 766 Invert. Bio. For Teach. (3) 

BIOL 701 Bio. Sem. (1) BIOL 702 Bio. Seminar (1) 

Education (3) Education (3) 

13 13 

Summer 

BIO. Elective 
Education Elective 
Education 790 (3) (if required) 



44 



Thesis 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

BIOL 661 Mammalian BIOL (3) BIOL 663 Cytology (3) 

BIOL 662 Bio. of Sex (3) BIOL 765 Intro. Exp. Zoology (3) 

BIOL 700 Environ. Bio. (3) Education or (3) 

BIOL 701 Bio. Sem. (1) Biology Elective (3) 

10 9 

SECOND YEAR 
Summer or First Semester 

BIOL 862 Research in Botany (3) 

or 
BIOL 863 Research in Biology (3) 
Elective (Optional) 

3 (+ elective) 

Directory of Faculty and Courses 

David W. Aldridge, B.S., University of Texas, Arlington; Ph.D., Syracuse Univer- 
sity; Assistant Professor 

Jerry Bennett, B.S., Tougaloo College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Iowa State 
University; Associate Professor 

A. James Hicks, B.S., Tougaloo College; Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana; St. 
Louis; Professor 

Alfred Hill, Jr., B.S., Prairie View College; M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., 
Kansas State University; Professor 

Thomas L. Jordan, B.A., Rockhurst College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
Madison; Washington-Seattle; Assistant Professor 

Bette McKnight, B.A., Barber Scotia; M.A., North Carolina Central University; 
Ph.D., Meharry Medical College; Assistant Professor 

Joseph J. White, B.S., M.S., North Carolina Centeral University at Durham; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois, Urbana; Professor 

Joseph J. Whittaker, III, A.B., Talladega College; Ph.D., Meharry Medical College; 
Postdoctorals, Purdue University and Washington University; Associate Profes- 
sor and Chairperson 

James A. Williams, A.B., Talladega College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Brown 
University; Professor 



CHEMISTRY 

Alex N. Williamson, Chairperson 

Office: Room 116, Hines Hall 

The objectives of the Graduate Division in Chemistry are to provide the theoretical 
and experimental training experiences which are necessary for those students who 
are pursuing a Master of Science degree in Chemistry. The Department also offers 
special courses which may be used for teacher renewal certificates. 

Degrees Offered 

1. Master of Science Degree in Chemistry 

2. Master of Science in Education with concentration in chemistry 



45 



General Requirements 

Admission to the Graduate School under one of the following options: 

1. Unconditional admission 

2. Provisional admission 

3. Special student 

Departmental Requirements 

Admission to a degree program requires the following: 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution 

2. An undergraduate major in chemistry which includes one year of physical chem- 
istry and one year of differential and integral calculus. 

M.S. in Chemistry: 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science Degree in Chemistry, the student must complete the following: 

1. Required Courses 

Chemistry 711— Structural Inorganic Chemistry 

Chemistry 722— Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry 743 — Chemical Thermodynamics 

Chemistry 701— Seminar 

Chemistry 732— Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Chemistry 799— Thesis Research 

Chemistry 702— Chemical Research 

(A maximum of 9 hrs. may be earned in 702) 

2. Other Requirements 

a. 2-9 s.h. in electives 

b. GRE (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Chemistry). Scores must be sub- 
mitted to the Graduate School Office. 

c. Satisfactory completion of an examination in German, French or Russian. 

d. Satisfactory presentation and defense of a thesis. 

e. One academic year of residence at A. and T. 



M.S. in Education with concentration in Chemistry: 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science Degree in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Chemistry 711, 722, 732, 743 and 701 

2. 9 additional semester hours in Chemistry, including a special problems course in 
Inorganic, Analytical, Organic, or Physical Chemistry. 

3. 2 hours of electives 

Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science Degree In Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Chemistry 711, 722, 732, 743 and 701 

2. A Thesis in Education 

3. 9 hours of electives 



46 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 



Course Description 

CHEM-610 Inorganic Synthesis 

CHEM-611 Advanced Inorganic 

CHEM-621 Intermediate Organic Chemistry 

CHEM-624 Qualitative Organic Chemistry 

CHEM-631 Electroanalytical Chemistry 

CHEM-641 Radiochemistry 

CHEM-642 Radioisotope Techniques and Application 

CHEM-643 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 

CHEM-651 General Biochemistry 



Credit 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
4 
5 



Graduate Students Only 

(Inorganic) 



CHEM-711 

CHEM-716 

(Organic) 

CHEM-721 

CHEM-722 

CHEM-723 

CHEM-726 

CHEM-727 



Structural Inorganic Chemistry 
Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 



Elements of Organic Chemistry 

Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 

Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 

Organic Preparations 
(Biochemistry) 

CHEM-756 Selected Topics in Biochemistry 
(Analytical Chemistry) 
CHEM-731 Modern Analytical Chemistry 
CHEM-732 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 
CHEM-736 Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry 
(Physical Chemistry) 

CHEM-741 Principles of Physical Chemistry I 
CHEM-742 Principles of Physical Chemistry II 
CHEM-743 Chemical Thermodynamics 
CHEM-744 Chemical Spectroscopy 
CHEM-746 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 
CHEM-748 Collaid Chemistry 
CHEM-749 Chemical Kinetics 



3 
3 

3 
3 
2 
3 
1-2 



Research and Special Topics 

CHEM-701 Seminar 

CHEM-702 Chemical Research 

CHEM-715 Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry 

CHEM-725 Special Problems in Organic Chemistry 

CHEM-735 Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry 

CHEM-745 Special Problems in Physical Chemistry 

CHEM-755 Special Problems in Biochemistry 



1 

2-5 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 



Chemical Instructions 

CHEM-663 Selected Topics in Chemistry INSTRUCTION I 

CHEM-664 Selected Topics in Chemistry INSTRUCTION II 

CHEM-765 Special Problems in Chemistry INSTRUCTION I 

CHEM-766 Special Problems in Chemistry INSTRUCTION II 

CHEM-767 Special Problems in Chemistry INSTRUCTION III 

CHEM-768 Special Problems in Chemistry IV 



47 



Thesis Research 

CHEM 233-799 Thesis Research 



Directory of Faculty 

William Adeniyi, B.S., Hampton University; M.S., Loyola University of Chicago; 
Ph.D., Baylor University; Assistant Professor 

Evans Booker, B.S., Saint Augustine's College; M.S., Tuskegee University; Asso- 
ciate Professor 

Etta Gravely, B.S., Howard University; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State Uni- 
versity; Ed.D., UNC-Greensboro; Associate Professor 

Vallie Guthrie, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., Fisk Univer- 
sity; Ed.D., American University; Associate Professor 

Lynda M. Jordan, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.S., Atlanta 
University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor 

Alvin P. Kennedy, Sr., B.S., Grambling University; Ph.D., University of California, 
Berkeley; Assistant Professor 

Claude N. Lamb, B.S., Mount Union College; M.S., North Carolina Central Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Howard University; Associate Professor 

Alex N. Williamson, B.S., Jackson State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois; 
Associate Professor and Chairman 

Jothi Kumar, B.Sc, Annamalai University, Cdm., India; Ph.D., Kansas State Uni- 
versity; Associate Professor 



COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

Joseph Monroe, Chairperson 

David Bellin, Graduate Director 

Office: 113 Graham Building 

Objectives 

The Master of Science Program in Computer Science is designed to meet the need 
for technical and/or managerial specialists in research, academia, and industry. 
Two areas of concentration (Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence) are 
offered. 

Degree Offered 

Master of Science in Computer Science 

The MSCS program offers the options of Thesis (30 credits), Project (33 credits), or 
Written Examination (33 credits). Unconditional admission to the program is 
granted to students with a BS degree in computer science from a CSAB accredited 
program with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Specific degree and admissions requirements 
are detailed in the department Graduate Student Handbook and the Graduate 
School catalog. 

Graduate Record Examination scores for Master of Science Degree in Computer 
Science, although not necessary, will be given consideration in making decisions 
regarding financial assistance. 

Master's Program General Description 

While the research interests of faculty members cover many areas of computer 
science, the department is building its strength in the areas of Software Engineering 
(especially object-oriented approaches) and Artificial Intelligence. We are building 
an innovative graduate program, combining real world knowledge with the techni- 
cal excellence of the most advanced software technologies. In keeping with our 



48 



historical mission, the program also provides students with knowledge of organiza- 
tional theory, management practices, information economics, and societal and policy 
frameworks. 

Software Engineering "The systematic approach to the development, operation, 
maintenance, and retirement of software" is the definition of software engineering. 
Software is not only the program code, but includes the various documents needed 
for the development, installation, utilization, and maintenance of a system. Engi- 
neering refers to the application of a systems approach to the production of large 
software systems. Methodologies for analysis and design are evolving, competing, 
and themselves being automated through the use of CASE (computer aided software 
engineering) tools. The methods of software engineering seek to produce systems of 
high quality, on time, at the lowest costs possible. Research projects include object 
oriented methodologies, software production cost modelling, software reliability 
engineering, and the social implications of computer technology. 

Artificial Intelligence Artificial intelligence uses symbolic computation and 
complex interrelations of variables to produce "intelligent" responses to problem 
situations. The responses are intelligent in the sense that unforeseen situations are 
accommodated and decisions are not hard-coded into programs. Problems are fre- 
quently "ill-structured", that is, they cannot be stated in the forms required by 
commonly used deterministic and sequential algorithms. Artificial intelligence 
often involves search and inference and frequently supports human decision making. 
It is thus natural to view artificial intelligence software as tackling problems as 
humans would tackle them. Research topics include mobile robots, computer vision, 
automated reasoning, the acquisition and representation of knowledge, and the 
analysis of decision making in realistic business settings. Artificial intelligence uses 
a multitude of paradigms, willingly collaborates with other areas of computer 
science, and pursues real-world applications. 

List of Graduate Courses 

COMP 600 Special Topics— Foundations of Software Engineering 

COMP 631 Linear and Non-Linear Programming 

COMP 645 Artificial Intelligence 

COMP 650 Advanced Operating Systems * 

COMP 653 Computer Graphics 

COMP 662 Computer Aided Instruction # 

COMP 663 Compiler Construction t 

COMP 665 Principles of Optimization t 

COMP 670 Advanced Computer Architecture 

COMP 676 Computer Network Architecture # 

COMP 680 Systems Analysis Techniques # 

COMP 685 Advanced Design and Analysis of Algorithms * 

COMP 690 Advanced Topics in Computer Science 

COMP 691 Independent Study 

COMP 692 Project Research 

COMP 696 Information, Privacy, and Security # 

COMP 710 Software Specification, Analysis and Design *** 

COMP 711 Software System Design, Implementation, Verification & 

Validation *** 

COMP 712 Software Project Management *** 

COMP 713 Social Impacts of Software Systems t# 

COMP 714 Case, Automated Development, & Information Engineering # 

COMP 715 Decision Support Systems t# 

COMP 717 Software Fault Tolerance # 

COMP 718 Object Oriented Software Engineering # 

COMP 719 Software Reuse Techniques # 



49 



COMP 740 Advanced Artificial Intelligence ** 

COMP 741 Knowledge Representation and Acquisition ** 

COMP 742 Automated Reasoning f 

COMP 745 Computational Linguistics t 

COMP 747 Computer Vision Methodologies t 

COMP 749 Intelligent Robots t 

COMP 750 Distributed Systems t# 

COMP 756 Performance Modeling and Evaluation t# 

COMP 780 Theoretical Computer Science: Formal Models and Semantics #t 

COMP 790 Special Topics in Computer Science 

COMP 791 Current Topics in Computer Science + 

COMP 797 MS Thesis Research 

COMP 798 MSCS Project 



* = Core course, required of all students 

** = Required for Artificial Intelligence specialization 
*** = Required for Software Engineering specialization 
t = Approved AI specialization elective 

# = Approved SE specialization elective 

+ = Required every semester for full time students 

Computer Science Faculty 

Salman Azhar, B.S., Wake Forest University; M.S., Ph.D., Duke University; Assis- 
tant Professor 

David Bellin, B.A., University of Saskatchewan (Canada); M.S., Polytechnic Insti- 
tute of New York; Ph.D., City University of New York; Associate Professor 

Shearon A. Brown, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Illinois; Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Albert Esterline, B.A., Lawrence University; M.Litt., Ph.D., University of St. 
Andrews (Scotland); Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Assistant Professor 

David Goldstein, B.S., Temple University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 
University of Texas-Arlington 

DechangGu, B.S., Hefei Polytechnic University; M.E., Chinese Academy of Science; 
M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; Ph.D., State University of 
New York at Albany; Assistant Professor 

Martha L. Haigler, B.S., Fayetteville State University; M.S., Stevens Institute of 
Technology; Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Rodney E. Harrigan, B.S., Paine College; M.S., Howard University; Adjunct Assist- 
ant Professor 

Joseph Monroe, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas 
A&M University; Ronald McNair Chair; Professor and Interim Chairperson 

Kenneth A. Williams, B.S., M.S., Michigan Technological University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota; Assistant Professor 

Anna Yu, B.S., Xiamen University; M.S., Hefei Polytechnic University; Ph.D., 
Stevens Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Barbara Saunders, Acting Chairperson 

Office: 201 Hodgin Hall 

Objectives 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction provides the professional studies 
component for the preparation of teachers and other school personnel at the master's 
degree level. The department cooperates with the various academic departments of 
the University for teacher education preparation. In addition, the department offers 
concentrations in Elementary Education, Reading Education, and Educational 
Media. 

50 



Degrees Offered 

Master of Science in Education — Elementary Education (K-6) 
Master of Science in Education — Educational Media 
Master of Science in Education — Reading Education 

General Program Requirements 

Degree seeking students must follow the general admission requirements for 
graduate studies. They must meet professional education requirements for a Class A 
teaching certificate, and must also meet the requirements for admission to candi- 
dacy for a degree as stated in "Admission and Other Information." 

Departmental Requirements 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND READING EDUCATION - Generally, 
the programs require a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate-level courses for 
a master's degree and at least 18 semester hours for certification in reading. An 
overall grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained for the degree programs and 
for certification in reading. 

EDUCATIONAL MEDIA — The program requires a minimum of 30 semester 
hours. Of this number, 24 semester hours are required in the major, three semester 
hours of an elective within the major, three semester hours in a cognate course 
related to the major, three semester hours in Foundations of Education, and three 
semester hours in Curriculum Development. All majors must complete the 700 
level Internship and Seminar in Educational Media. 

Accreditation 

All Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education arid approved by the North Carolina State 
Department of Public Instruction. 

Career Opportunities 

In addition to preparing teachers for elementary education (K-6) and reading 
education (K-12), a degree in these fields also provides for career opportunities in 
other areas related to the education of children and youth. 

The Educational Media Program's primary emphasis is the preparation of school 
media coordinators at the 076 certification level. The program also provides training 
for employment as educational media specialists and/or trainers in business and 
social agencies as well as the health professions. 076 certification might not be 
required for preparing non-school media specialists. A variety of activities such as 
teleconferences, workshops, and required supervised internships provide students 
with experiences supplementing classroom instruction. Students seeking 076 certi- 
fication must select an accredited elementary or secondary school in which to fulfill 
the internship requirement. Students not seeking 076 certification have some flexi- 
bility in their choice of internship sites. 

Reading Education Curriculum: 30 Semester Hours Required (Minimum) 

The Reading Education curriculum has two approaches to certification, namely 
Option I and Option II. Option I is for those students who wish to complete graduate 
level certification, while Option II is for those students desiring to complete a degree 
program in Reading. All courses listed below are 3 semester hours unless otherwise 
noted. 

A. Option I: Requires 18 semester hours from the following. 
Reading — 15 semester hours 

CUIN 620 Foundations in Reading 

CUIN 621 Word Recognition/Identification Skills 

CUIN 622 Reading Through the Primary Years 

51 



CUIN 631 
CUIN 726 



CUIN 718 
ENGL 626 
ENGL 710 
ENGL 754 



CUIN 623 Reading in the Elementary Grades 
CUIN 624 Reading in the Secondary School 

CUIN 629 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading (prerequisite: reading methods) 
CUIN 630 Reading Practicum (prerequisite: reading methods and classroom 
diagnosis) 
Reading for the Atypical Learner 
Reading in the Content Areas 
The following courses are required for State Certification in reading: CUIN 620, 
622, 623 or 624, 629, 726. 
Cognate Areas — 3 semester hours 
CUIN 713 Computers in Education 

Media in Special Education and Reading 
Children's Literature 
Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 
History and Structure of the English Language 
Other Requirements 
Overall grade point average of 3.0 on all graduate courses 
Comprehensive Examination 
NTE (Reading Specialist) 
Option II: A minimum of 30 semester hours is required. This program leads to 
the Master of Science in Reading. 
Reading: 18 semester hours 
CUIN 620 Foundations in Reading* 

Word Recognition/Identification Skills 
Reading Through the Primary Years 
Reading in the Elementary Grades 
Diagnosis in Reading* (Prerequisite: reading methods) 
Reading Practicum* (Prerequsites: reading methods and class- 
room diagnosis) 
Reading for the Atypical Learner 
Reading in the Content Areas 

Advanced Diagnosis (Prerequisites: reading foundations, read- 
ing methods, classroom diagnosis) 
Organization and Administration of Reading Programs* 
Advanced Practicum (Prerequsites: reading foundations, reading 

methods, classroom diagnosis, reading practicum) 
Seminar and Research in Reading* 
Foundations of Education Courses — 6 semester hours required with 3 hours in 
foundations of education (history, philosophy, psychology or statistics or theory of 
education, and 3 hours in curriculum (curriculum development, curriculum in 
the elementary school or curriculum in the secondary school). The candidate 
should seek the help of an adviser for selection. 
CUIN 701 Philosophy of Education 
CUIN 703 Educational Sociology 
CUIN 625 Theory of American Public Education 
CUIN 720 Curriculum Development 
CUIN 721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 
CUIN 722 Curriculum in the Secondary School 
CUIN 726 Educational Psychology 
HDSV 727 Child Growth and Development 
HDSV 710 Educational Statistics 
Cognate Areas — 6 semester hours required 
CUIN 718 Media in Special Education and Reading 
ENGL 710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 
CUIN 754 History and Structure of the English Language 



CUIN 621 
CUIN 622 
CUIN 623 
CUIN 629 
CUIN 630 

CUIN 631 
CUIN 726 
CUIN 731 

CUIN 732 
CUIN 733 

CUIN 734 



52 



If a student has already earned 18 semester hours in Reading at the Class A level 
for state certification purposes then he/she may elect additional hours necessary 
to complete requirements from the following courses with academic advisement. 
Required Reading Courses for the M.S. Degree in Reading 

CUIN 620 Foundations in Reading 

CUIN 730 Problems in the Improvement of Reading 

CUIN 622 Reading Through the Primary Years 

CUIN 623 Reading in the Elementary Grades 

CUIN 629 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading 

CUIN 731 Advanced Diagnosis in Reading 

CUIN 726 Reading in the Content Areas 

CUIN 732 Organization and Administration of Reading Programs 

CUIN 734 Seminar and Research in Reading 
Cognate Areas 

CUIN 713 Computers in Education 

CUIN 718 Media in Special Education and Reading 

ENGL 626 Children's Literature 

ENGL 710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 

ENGL 754 History and Structure of the English Language 

When one has no background in reading, 30 semester hours of the master's 
degree program would be in reading and closely related study. In addition six 
semester hours of course work are prescribed by the Graduate School making a 
total of 36 semester hours for the master's degree. 
Other Requirements 

1. Graduate Records Examination 

2. Qualifying Examination 

3. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

4. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Reading Education 

5. Maintain a 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

Note: A maximum of Six (6) semester hours may be transferred from another 
comparable institution toward satisfying the Master of Science degree in 
reading. 



Elementary Education Curriculum (Grades K - 6) 

The elementary education curriculum for the Master of Science degree offers both 
a non-thesis and a thesis program. 

Non-Thesis Program (Minimum: 33 hours) 

Professional Core Courses ( 9 hours) 

Content/Instructional Courses (15 hours) 

Research Courses ( 6 hours) 

Elective ( 3 hours) 

It is recommended that candidates who select the non-thesis program 
enroll in the following research courses: 

(1) CUIN 711: Methods and Techniques of Research, and 

(2) CUIN 783: Current Research in Elementary Education. 

Thesis Program (Minimum: 30 hours) 

Professional Core Courses ( 9 hours) 

Content/Instructional Courses (12 hours) 

Research Courses ( 6 hours) 

Elective ( 3 hours) 



It is recommended that candidates who select the thesis program enroll 
in the following research courses: 

(1) CUIN 711 Methods and Techniques of Research, and 

(2) CUIN 791 Thesis Research. Candidates may select CUIN 710 as 
an elective. 



Master of Science in Elementary Education (K-6) 
GRADUATE COURSE OF STUDY 

I. Professional Core Courses (9 hours) 

Three (3) semester hours are to be chosen from each of the following areas: 

A. The nature of the learner and the learning process 

HDSV 726 Educational Psychology 
HDSV 727 Child Growth and Development 
HDSV 728 Measurement and Evaluation 

B. Theoretical, historical, sociological and philosophical bases for educa- 
tional practices 

CUIN 625 Theory of American Public Education 

CUIN 626 History of American Education 

CUIN 627 The Afro-American Experience in American Education 

CUIN 628 Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education 

CUIN 701 Philosophy of Education 

CUIN 703 Educational Sociology 

CUIN 780 Comparative Education 

CUIN 781 Issues in Elementary Education 

C. Curriculum Development 

CUIN 683 Curriculum in Early Childhood 

CUIN 720 Curriculum Development 

CUIN 721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 

II. Content/Instructional Courses (12-15 hours) 

Twelve to fifteen hours taken from English, reading, fine arts, health and physical 
education, mathematics, science, special education, curriculum and instruction, and 
social studies with emphasis on instructional areas most appropriate for elementary 
education (K-6). 

A. Human Environment and Family Sciences 

HEFS 632 Maternal and Development Nutrition 
HEFS 734 Nutrition Education 

B. Art 

ART 600 Public School Art 
ART 608 Arts and Crafts 

C. English 

ENGL 603 Introduction to Folklore 

ENGL 626 Children's Literature 

ENGL 627 Literature for Adolescents 

ENGL 650 Afro- American Folklore 

ENGL 710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 

ENGL 711 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers II 

ENGL 754 History and Structure of the English Language 

D. Speech 

SPCH 610 Speech for Teachers 
THEA 620 Creative Dramatics 

E. History 

HIST 600 The British Colonies and the American Revolution 
HIST 603 Civil War and Reconstruction 



54 



HIST 606 U.S. History 1900-1932 

HIST 607 U.S. History Since 1932-Present 

HIST 615 Seminar in the History of Black America 

HIST 640 Topics in Geography of Anglo- America 

HIST 641 Topics in World Geography 

F. Political Science 

POLI 640 Federal Government 

POLI 641 State Government 

POLI 643 Urban Politics and Government 

G. Mathematics and Science 

MATH 625 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, 1 
MATH 626 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, II 
BIOL 600 General Science for Elementary Teachers 
BIOL 766 Invertebrate Biology for Elementary and Secondary School 
Teachers 

H. Music 

MUSI 609 Music in Early Childhood 

MUSI 610 Music in Elementary School Today 

I. Curriculum and Instruction 

CUIN 611 Utilization of Educational Media 

CUIN 613 Developmental Media for Children 

CUIN 620 Foundations of Reading 

CUIN 621 World Recognition/Identification Skills 

CUIN 622 Teaching Reading Through the Primary Years 

CUIN 623 Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in the 

Elementary School 
CUIN 629 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction (prerequisite: 

reading methods) 
CUIN 631 Reading for the Atypical Learner 
CUIN 641 Cultural Diversity— Perspectives and Teaching 

Implications 
CUIN 713 Computers in Education 
CUIN 781 Issues in Elementary Education 

J. Human Development and Services 

HDSV 660 Introduction to Exceptional Children 
HDSV 661 Psychology of the Exceptional Child 
HDSV 664 Materials, Methods and Problems in Teaching Mentally 
Retarded Children 

K. Physical Education/Health 

PHED 651 Personal, School and Community Health Problems 
PHED 652 Methods and Materials in Health Education for 

Elementary and Secondary School Teachers 
PHED 655 Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education 

III. Research Courses (6 hours) 

A. Curriculum and Instruction 

CUIN 710 Educational Statistics 
CUIN 711 Methods and Techniques of Research 
CUIN 783 Current Research in Elementary Education 
(Non-Thesis Option) 
Note: After completion of 24 hours or permission of advisor or department 
chairperson. 

CUIN 791 Thesis Research (Thesis Option) 
Note: After completion of 24 hours or permission of advisor or department 
chairperson. 



55 



IV. Elective (3 hours) 

Other Requirements 

1. Graduate Record Examination 

2. Qualifying Examination 

3. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

4. Maintain a 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

CUIN 620 Foundations in Reading 

CUIN 621 Word Recognition/Identification Skills 

CUIN 622 Teaching Reading Through the Primary Years 

CUIN 623 Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 

CUIN 624 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School 

CUIN 629 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction 

CUIN 630 Reading Practicum 

CUIN 631 Reading for the Atypical Learner 

HDSV 660 Introduction to Exceptional Children 

HDSV 661 Psychology of the Exceptional Child 

HDSV 662 Mental Deficiency 

HDSV 663 Measurement and Evaluation in Special Education 

HDSV 664 Materials, Methods and Problems in Teaching Mentally Retarded 

Children 

HDSV 665 Practicum in Special Education 

CUIN 683 Curriculum in Early Childhood 

CUIN 684 Methods in Early Childhood 



Graduate Courses 

CUIN 721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 
Reading in the Content Areas 
Problems in the Improvement of Reading 
Advanced Diagnosis in Reading Instruction 
Organization and Administration of Reading Programs 
Advanced Practicum in Reading 
Seminar and Research in Reading 



CUIN 726 
CUIN 730 
CUIN 731 
CUIN 732 
CUIN 733 
CUIN 734 
CUIN 780 
CUIN 781 
CUIN 783 
CUIN 775 
CUIN 776 
CUIN 777 
CUIN 790 
CUIN 791 



Comparative Education 
Issues in Elementary Education 
Current Research in Elementary Education 
Independent Readings in Education I 
Independent Readings in Education II 
Independent Readings in Education II 
Seminar in Educational Problems 
Thesis Research 



Credit 3(3-0) 



Credit 3(1-4) 
Credit 3 



Educational Media Curriculum: 30 Semester Hours Required 

Courses Required (21 semester hours required) 

CUIN 600 Organization of Media Collections 

CUIN 601 Reference Materials 

CUIN 603 Production of Educational Media 

CUIN 604 Educational Media Administration 

CUIN 611 Utilization of Educational Media 

CUIN 612 Instructional Design Basics 

CUIN 613 Developmental Media for Children or 

CUIN 614 Book Selection & Related Materials for Young Children 

CUIN 708 Research in Educational Media and Internship 



56 



Educational Media Elective— three (3) hours required 

CUIN 608 Programming for Instructional Radio and Television 

CUIN 609 Production for Instructional Radio and Television 

CUIN 700 Programmed Instruction 

CUIN 701 Media Retrieval System 

CUIN 704 Professional Development of Media Personnel 

CUIN 707 Workshop in Educational Media 

CUIN 709 Introduction to Theories in Media/Communication 

CUIN 712 Advanced Information Services 

CUIN 715 Advanced Production in Instructional Radio and Television 

CUIN 716 Techniques in Multimedia Design, Production, and Presentation 

CUIN 717 Media Services to Business and Industry 

CUIN 718 Media in Special Education and Reading 

TECH 630 Photography and Educational Media 

Cognate Area — three (3) hours required 

CUIN 720 Curriculum Development (Required) 

CUIN 713 Computers in Education 

EDLP 651 Introduction to Adult Education 

EDLP 761 Organization and Administration of Schools 

Foundation in Education — three (3) hours required 

CUIN 701 Philosophy of Education 

CUIN 703 Educational Sociology 

CUIN 790 Seminar in Educational Problems 

HDSV 726 Educational Psychology 

Other Requirements 

1. Graduate Record Examination 

2. Qualifying Examination 

3. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

4. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Educational Media 

5. Maintain a 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

6. NTE (Library/Media) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

CUIN 603 Production of Instructional Materials 

CUIN 611 Utilization of Educational Media Concentration 

CUIN 600 Organization of Media Collections 

CUIN 601 Reference Materials 

CUIN 604 Administration of Educational Media 

CUIN 612 Systems Approach and Curriculum 

CUIN 613 Developmental Media for Children (Children's Literature) 

CUIN 614 Book Selection and Related Materials for Young People 

CUIN 615 Programming for Instructional Radio and Television 

CUIN 609 Production for Instructional Radio and Television 

CUIN 610 Broadcasting for Instructional Radio and Television 

Graduate Courses 

CUIN 705 Programmed Instruction 

CUIN 706 Media Retrieval Systems 

CUIN 707 Workshop in Educational Media 

CUIN 708 Research in Educational Media and Internship 

CUIN 717 Media in Special Education and Reading 

CUIN 712 Advanced Information Services 



57 



CUIN 713 Computers in Education 

CUIN 715 Advanced Production in Instructional Radio and Television 

CUIN 717 Media Services to Business and Industry 

Department of Curriculum and Instruction Faculty 

Karen D. Guy, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University, M.Ed., North 
Carolina Central University; Ed.D., University of North Dakota; Assistant Pro- 
fessor and Director of Student Teaching and Internships 

Wanda B. Hall, B.S.C., North Carolina Central University, M.B.A., Atlanta Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Brigham Young University, Assistant Professor 

Julia G. Hester, M.S., University of North Carolina At Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Duke 
University; Assistant Professor. 

Pamela I. Hunter, B.A., Livingtone College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro; Ph.D., Ohio State; Professor 

Barbara Saunders, B.S., Central State University; M.S., Indiana State University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University; Associate Professor and Acting Chairperson of 
Curriculum and Instruction 

Genevieve L. Williams, B.A., Bennett College; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 
University; Ph.D., Ohio State University, Assistant Professor 



ECONOMICS 

Michael Simmons, Chairperson 

Office: 325 Merrick 

COURSES OFFERED TO ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

Course Description Credit 

ECON-601 Economic Understanding 3 

ECON-602 Manpower Problems and Prospects 3 

ECON-603 Manpower Planning 3 

ECON-604 Economic Evaluation Methods 3 

ECON-610 Consumer Economics 3 
ECON-615 Economic Political and Social Aspects of the Black Experience 3 

COURSES OFFERED TO GRADUATE STUDENTS 

ECON-701 Labor and Industrial Relations 3 

ECON-705 Government Economic Problems 3 

ECON-710 Economic Development and Resource Use 3 

ECON-720 Development of Economic Systems 3 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND POLICY 

Henry T. Cameron, Chairperson 

Room 112, Hodgin Hall 

The objectives of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy are to 
offer graduate level programs of preparation in Administration, Adult Education 
and Supervision. The Master's degree programs in Administration and Supervision 
are teacher education programs and they are consistent with the state adopted 
competency-based guidelines. These programs of study lead to North Carolina Certi- 
fication at the Administrator I and Curriculum Instructional-Specialist I levels. The 
Master of Science in the Adult Education program is not considered as a teacher 
education program but it is developed and implemented on competency-based guide- 
lines. The Department also offers programs of certification in Administration and 

58 



Supervision for those students who already hold a Master's degree in education with 
certification in other professional areas. The graduate programs in the department 
are designed to prepare students for positions in public school administration, adult 
education, supervision of instruction in public schools and teaching or administra- 
tion primarily at the Community College/Technical Institute levels. 

Degrees Offered 

Education — Administration — M.S. 
Education — Adult Education — M.S. 
Education — Supervision — M.S. 

Certification only programs are offered for The School Administrator and the 
Curriculum Instructional— Specialist I. 

General Program Requirements 

Requirements for admission to the degree programs in the Department of Educa- 
tional Leadership and Policy are as follows: 

1. Educational Administration and Supervision 

a. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution 

b. Class "A" Certificate in area of concentration 

c. Satisfactory completion of all graduate school requirements for admission to 
candidacy for a degree program 

2. Adult Education 

The admission of students to the graduate program in Adult Education is based 
upon the general admission requirements of the Graduate School. 

3. Under policies of the Graduate School, candidacy for a degree requires the 
following: 

a. The Qualifying Essay (after completing nine (9) semester hours) 

b. The Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude and Advanced Test in 
Education) 

4. Requirements for Unconditional Admission: 

a. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution 

b. Overall grade point average of 2.6 in undergraduate studies 

c. Class "A" Certificate (or qualification for such certificate) 

d. Failure to meet any of these criteria may cause rejection of the applicant or 
may require additional undergraduate work to satisfy the requirements. 

Departmental Requirements 

The major in both Administration and Supervision (Curriculum Instructional- 
Specialist I) must complete thirty-three semester hours of University work for the 
graduate degree and must maintain an overall grade point average of 3.0. 

Students who already hold a Master's degree and seek Certification only must 
meet all program requirements for Certification, including a minimum of twelve 
semester hours in the department and the departmental comprehensive examina- 
tion in the discipline for which he/she is seeking Certification. 

Before enrolling in a degree or certification program, each student is required to 
meet with the departmental chairperson and to be assigned a faculty advisor who 
will be responsible for approval of the student's program of study. The student who 
holds a Master's degree and seeks Certification only must submit a transcript of 
his/her graduate studies to the departmental chairperson prior to, or at the time of, 
the initial conference. 

The major in Adult Education is required to complete a minimum of 30 graduate 
semester hours with thesis or 33 hours without the thesis and must maintain an 
overall grade point average of 3.0. At least 50% of the courses counted toward the 
graduate degree must be of courses offered to graduate students only i.e., courses 
numbered 700-799. Each graduate student must satisfactorily complete an adult 
teaching practicum under supervision. 

59 



Accreditation 

The graduate degree programs in administration and supervision are approved by 
the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction, National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Commission on College of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 

Career Opportunities 

Graduate degree and certification programs qualify the student for the principal- 
ship and/or supervisory positions at the elementary and secondary school levels. The 
program in postsecondary education is designed to meet the needs of administrative, 
supervisory and teaching personnel at the community college and technical institute 
levels. 

Students who earn the degree in Adult Education may look forward to careers in 
such endeavors as Agricultural Extension, Adult Basic Education, Community 
College Education, Religious Education, Law Enforcement, Continuing Education, 
Nursing, and Community School Education. 



CURRICULUM GUIDE 

Administration: 33 Semester Hours Required 

This program is designed for students who are interested in qualifying for State 
Certification as Administrator I (the principal's certificate). Completion of this 
program does not qualify one for the graduate teaching certificate. 

Education 740, Introduction to Educational Administration, and Education 741, 
The Governance of Public Education, are prerequisites for all other professional 
courses in the specific areas Administration and/or Supervision. 

Students seeking the Master's degree and/or Certification in Curriculum In- 
structional-Specialist I (Supervision) must meet the requirements for a "G" Certifi- 
cate in a teaching specialty and a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours in 
Administration. 

1. Courses 

a. Foundations in Education - 3 hours 
320-726 Educational Psychology or 
311-701 Philosophy of Education 

b. Organization and Administration — 6 hours selected from: 
312-740 Introduction to Educational Administration and 
312-741 The Governance of Public Education 

312-760 The Middle School 
312-762 The Principalship 

c. Curriculum, Instruction and Supervision — 6 hours selected from: 
310-720 Curriculum Development 

312-755 Supervision of Instruction 
312-756 Supervision of Student Teachers 

d. Cognate Disciplines — 6 hours selected from: 
Economics 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Anthropology 

e. Internship — Administrative Field Experience — 3 hours 
312-769 Problems in Educational Administration 

f. Six (6) hours electives 

2. Other Requirements 

a. GRE (aptitude and advanced tests in education) 

b. Master's Comprehensive in Education and Administration 

c. Overall grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate courses 

60 



Curriculum Instructional-Specialist: Minimum 42 Semester Hours Required 

For the Curriculum Instructional-Specialist's I (Master's degree) Certificate, the 
State of North Carolina requires five (5) years of teaching and/or supervisory or 
administrative experience within the past eight years. A student will not be recom- 
mended for the North Carolina Instructional-Specialist's Certificate without the 
minimum five (5) years of experience specified above. 

Courses in Education and Psychology — 15 Semester Hours 

1. Supervision — 3 hours required 
312-755 Supervision of Instruction 

312-757 Problems in Supervision in the Elementary School 
312-758 Problems in High School Supervision 

2. Curriculum — 3 hours required 
310-720 Curriculum Development 

310-721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 
310-722 Curriculum in the Secondary School 

3. The Nature of Learning and the Learning Process — 3 hours required 
320-635 Educational Psychology and Learning 

320-726 Educational Psychology 
311-727 Child Growth and Development 

4. Organization and Administration — 6 hours required 
312-740 Introduction to Educational Administration and 
312-741 The Governance of Public Education 

5. Internship — Supervisory Field Experience — 3 hours 
312-770 Problems in Educational Supervision 

6. Educational Research — 3 hours required 
312-790 Seminar in Education Problems 

Required courses in subject matter to qualify for issuance of the graduate teacher's 
certificate — early childhood or intermediate, or secondary — 12-18 semester hours. 

Electives — if 12 semester credit hours are used to satisfy the above, 3 hours may be 
used as electives to meet the particular needs of the student. 

Other Requirements 

1. Qualifying Examination 

2. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

3. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Academic Discipline 

4. Overall grade point average of 3.0 in all graduate courses 

Total number of hours required 31-34 (31 for those completing work for the 
supervisor's program at the Early Childhood Education level and the Intermediate 
Education level). 

Faculty 

Marion R. Blair, B.S., A&T State College; M.A., Seton Hall University; Ed.D., 
Indiana University; Professor 

Henry T. Cameron, B.S., South Carolina State College; M.A., Fairfield University; 
Ed.D., University of Massachusetts; Associate Professor and Department Chair- 
person 

Edward B. Fort, B.S., M.S., Wayne State University; Ed.D., University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley; Professor and Chancellor 

Ronald O. Smith, B.S., Florida A&M University; M.A., Northeastern Illinois Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Purdue University; Associate Professor 



61 



Curriculum for Major in Adult Education 



Course Description 

EDLP-650 Special Problems in Adult Education 

EDLP-651 Introduction to Adult Education 

EDLP-652 Methods in Adult Education 

EDLP-653 Adult Development and Learning 

EDLP-654 Gerontology 

EDLP-690 The Community College and Post Secondary Education 

EDLP-700 History and Philosophy of Adult/Continuing Education 

EDLP-701 Organization, Administration and Supervision of Adult 

Education Programs 

EDLP-702 Practicum in Teaching Adults 

EDLP-703 Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult/Continuing 

Education 

EDLP-704 Independent Study 

EDLP-705 Thesis Research (Optional) 

CUIN-641 Teaching the Culturally Disadvantaged Learner 

CUIN-710 Methods and Techniques of Research 

CUIN-790 Seminar in Educational Problems 

CUIN-611 Utilization of Educational Media 

AGED-601 Adult Education in Occupational Education 

SOCI-669 Small Groups 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Course Offerings 

EDLP-650 Special Problems in Adult Education 

EDLP-651 Introduction to Adult Education 

EDLP-652 Methods in Adult Education 

EDLP-653 Adult Development and Learning 

EDLP-654 Gerontology 

EDLP-688 School Law and The Teacher 

EDLP-689 Contemporary Issues in Administration 

EDLP-690 The Community College and Post Secondary Education 

EDLP-700 History and Philosophy of Adult/Continuing Education 

EDLP-701 Organization, Administration and Supervision of Adult Education 

Programs 

EDLP-702 Practicum in Teaching Adults 

EDLP-703 Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult/Continuing Education 

EDLP-704 Independent Study 

EDLP-705 Thesis Research (Optional) 

EDLP-740 Introduction to Educational Administration and 

EDLP-741 The Governance of Public Education 

EDLP-754 Politics and Policies of Education 

EDLP-755 Supervision of Instruction 

EDLP-756 Supervision of Student Teachers 

EDLP-757 Problems in Supervision in the Elementary School 

EDLP-758 Problems in High School Supervision 

EDLP-759 Computer Applications for Administrators and Supervisors 

EDLP-760 The Middle School 

EDLP-762 The Principalship 

EDLP-763 Public School Administration 

EDLP-764 Pupil Personnel Administration 

EDLP-765 School Community Relations and Communication 

EDLP-766 School Planning 

EDLP-767 Public School Finance 



62 



EDLP-768 Principles of School Law 

EDLP-769 Problems in Educational Administration (Internship) 

EDLP-770 Problems in Educational Supervision (Internship) 

EDLP-771 Program Development: Community Education 

EDLP-772 Program Management: Community Education 

EDLP-773 Leadership 

E DLP-776 Principles of College Teaching 

EDLP-777 Seminar in Postsecondary Education 

EDLP-778 Student Personnel Services 

EDLP-779 Technical Education in Community Junior Colleges 

EDLP-781 Internship (Community College/Technical Institute) 

EDLP-785-A Independent Readings in Education I 

EDLP-786-A Independent Readings in Education II 

EDLP-787-A Independent Readings in Education III 

EDLP-790-A Seminar in Education Problems 

EDLP-791-A Thesis Research 

EDLP-792 Advanced Seminar and Internship in Education Administration 

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Dr. Ronald Helms, Chairman 

Office: 448 McNair Hall 

Objective 

The objective of the graduate programs in Architectural Engineering is to provide 
advanced professional coursework in the areas of Structural Analysis and Design, 
Facilities Management, or Environmental Systems Analysis and Design. 

Degrees Offered 

Master of Science in Architectural Engineering 

Program Requirements 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program is based upon a bacca- 
laureate degree in Architectural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering, Industrial Engineering or Architecture. A grade point average of 3.0 
out of a 4.0 is required for unconditional admission to the program. Provisional 
admission may be granted to a candidate with a grade point average of at least 2.6 out 
of 4.0 if that individual's record indicates outstanding performance in his(her) major. 
Provisional admission may require successful completion of one or more undergrad- 
uate prerequisite courses. 

Graduate Record Examination scores for the Master of Science Degree in Archi- 
tectural Engineering, although not necessary, will be given consideration in making 
decisions regarding financial assistance. 

Departmental Requirements 

In order to graduate, students are required to maintain a grade point average of 
3.0 in all graduate (600 and 700) level coursework. A total of 31 class credit hours is 
required for those students electing the thesis option. A total of 34 credit hours is 
required for students electing the project option. 

Directory of Architectural Engineering Graduate Faculty 

Elias G. Abu-Saba, P.E., Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering; 
B.S.M.E., American University; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Peter Rojeski, Jr., P.E., Associate Professor and Chairman of Architectural Engi- 
neering; B.S.C.E., Clarkson University; M.S.C.E., Cornell University; Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University 

Harmohindar Singh, P.E., Professor of Architectural Engineering; M.S.M.E., Pun- 
jab University; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Wayne State University 

63 



Summary of Course Offerings 

Courses numbered 600-699 are open to qualified seniors and graduate students. 
Graduate credit is available to graduate students. Courses numbered 700 and above 
are open to qualified graduate students. 



Course Description 

AREN-601 Advanced Reinforced Concrete 

AREN-602 Advanced Structural Analysis 

AREN-603 Foundation Engineering 

AREN-604 Structural Systems 

AREN-605 Masonry Design 

AREN-606 Matrix Analys of Structures 

AREN-610 Airside System Design Concepts 

AREN-611 Hydronic Systems Design 

AREN-612 HVAC Controls, Operation & Maintenance 

AREN-613 Design of Energy Conservation Systems 

AREN-620 Architectural Design IV 

AREN-621 Advanced Architectural Design 

AREN-622 City Planning & Urban Design 

AREN-623 Integrated Building Design 

AREN-624 Facilities Management 

AREN-625 Computer-Aided Building Design 

AREN-660 Selected Topics in Engineering 

AREN-666 Special Projects 

AREN-700 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design II 

AREN-701 Advanced Structural Analysis II 

AREN-703 Design of Bldgs. for Ext. Wind/Earthquake 

AREN-704 Finite Element Analysis 

AREN-705 Advanced Foundation Engineering 

AREN-706 Advanced Structural Steel Design 

AREN-712 Energy Management Planning 

AREN-720 Facility Planning and Site Analysis 

AREN-721 Computer-Aided Project Management 

AREN-723 Professional Practice and Labor Relations 

AREN-777 Thesis 

AREN-784 Advanced HVAC System Design 

AREN-788 Research 

AREN-789 Special Topics 



Credit 
(Lec.-Lab) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(2-2) 

3(3-0) 

3(0-6) 

4(1-6) 

3(1-4) 

3(1-4) 

3(3-0) 

3(0-6) 

Var. (1-3) 

Var. (1-3) 

3(2-2) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-2) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

3(3-0) 

Var. (1-3) 

3(3-0) 

Var. (1-3) 

Var. (1-3) 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 
Environmental Systems Option 

Core Courses (16 credit hours) Credits 

AREN-731 Graduate Seminar 1 

AREN-623 Integrated Building Design I 3 

AREN-732 Integrated Building Design II 3 

AREN-604 Structural Systems 3 

AREN-734 Energy and Maintenance Management 3 

AREN-624 Facilities Management _3_ 

16 



64 



Thesis Option (31 total credit hours required including the Thesis) 

AREN-777 Thesis 

600/700 Mathematics or Operations Research Elective 

600/700 Environmental Systems Electives 

Thesis Option Total 
OR 



6 

3 

_6_ 

31 



Project Option (34 total credit hours required including the Project) 

AREN-776 Project 

600/700 Mathematics or Operations Research Elective 

600/700 Environmental Systems Electives 

Project Option Total 



3 
3 

34 



Environmental Systems Electives 

Course # Course Description 

AREN-610 Airside Systems Design Concepts 

AREN-611 Hydronic Systems Design 

AREN-612 HVAC Controls, Operation and Maintenance 

AREN-613 Design of Energy Conservation Systems 

AREN-710 HVAC Systems Analysis and Simulation 

AREN-711 Advanced Energy Conservation Systems 

AREN-712 Energy Management Planning 

MEEN-626* Advanced Fluid Mechanics 

MEEN-722* Statistical Thermodynamics 

MEEN-731* Conduction Heat Transfer 

MEEN-732* Convection Heat Transfer 

MEEN-733* Radiation Heat Transfer 

MEEN-737* Solar Thermal Energy Systems 

* These courses may require the student to take undergraduate prerequisites. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 
Structures Option 



Core Courses (16 credit hours) 

AREN-731 Graduate Seminar 

AREN-623 Integrated Building Design I 

AREN-732 Integrated Building Design II 

AREN-604 Structural Systems 

AREN-734 Energy and Maintenance Management 

AREN-624 Facilities Management 



Credits 

1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3_ 

16 



Thesis Option (31 total credit hours required including the Thesis) 

AREN-777 Thesis 

600/700 Mathematics or Operations Research Elective 

600/700 Structures Electives 

Thesis Option Total 
OR 



6 

3 

_6_ 

31 



65 



Project Option (34 total credit hours required including the Project) 

AREN-776 Project 

600/700 Mathematics or Operations Research Elective 

600/700 Structures Electives 

Project Option Total 



3 
3 

n_ 

34 



STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS ELECTIVES 

Course # Course Description 

AREN-601 Advanced Reinforced Concrete 

A REN -602 Advanced Structural Analysis 

AREN-603 Foundation Engineering 

AREN-606 Matrix Analysis of Structures 

AREN-605 Masonry Design 

AREN-700 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design II 

AREN-701 Advanced Structural Analysis II 

AREN-703 Design of Buildings for Extreme Wind and Earthquake 

Forces 

AREN-704 Finite Element Analysis 

AREN-705 Advanced Foundation Engineering 

AREN-706 Advanced Structural Steel Design 

MEEN-602* Advanced Strength of Materials 

MEEN-606* Mechanical Vibrations 

MEEN-610* Theory of Elasticity 

MEEN-612* Modern Composite Materials 

MEEN-706* Theory of Vibrations 

MEEN-710* Advanced Theory of Elasticity 

* These courses may require the student to take undergraduate prerequisites. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 



Facilities Management Option 

Core Courses (16 credit hours) 

AREN-731 Graduate Seminar 

AREN-623 Integrated Building Design I 

AREN-732 Integrated Building Design II 

AREN-604 Structural Systems 

AREN-734 Energy and Maintenance Management 

AREN-624 Facilities Management 



Credits 

1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3_ 

16 



Thesis Option (31 total credit hours required including the Thesis) 

AREN-777 Thesis 

600/700 Mathematics or Operations Research Elective 

600/700 Facilities Management Electives 

Thesis Option Total 
OR 
Project Option (34 total credit hours required including the Project) 

AREN-776 Project 

600/700 Mathematics or Operations Research Elective 

600/700 Facilities Management Electives 

Project Option Total 



6 

3 

_6_ 

31 

3 

3 

i2_ 

34 



66 



Facilities Management Electives 

Course # Course Description 

AREN-620 Architectural Design IV 

AREN-621 Advanced Architectural Design 

AREN-622 City Planning and Urban Design 

AREN-625 Computer- Aided Design 

AREN-720 Facility Planning and Site Analysis 

AREN-721 Computer-Aided Project Management 

AREN-723 Professional Practice and Labor Relations 

AREN-724 Value Analysis in Design and Construction 

INEN-625* Information Systems 

INEN-650* Operations Research II 

INEN-664* Safety Engineering 

INEN-678* Engineering Management 

INEN-716* Engineering Statistics 

ECON-603* Manpower Planning 

* These courses may require the student to take undergraduate prerequisites. 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Gary L. Lebby, Chairman 

Objective 

The objective of graduate study in the Electrical Engineering Department is to 
provide an advanced level of study in the areas of: (i) computer engineering; (ii) 
power systems and controls; (iii) communication and signal processing; (iv) elec- 
tronic materials and devices. The Master of Science (M.S.) in Electrical Engineering 
program is designed to prepare graduates for doctoral level study or for advanced 
professional practice. The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Electrical Engineering 
provides instruction and independent research opportunities for students. The 
graduates of the Ph.D. program in Electrical Engineering are well prepared for 
research oriented careers in industry, governmental laboratories, and as university 
faculty. 

Degrees Offered 

Master of Science (M.S.)in Electrical Engineering 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Electrical Engineering 

Master of Science 

General Program Requirements 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program in the Department of 
Electrical Engineering is based upon a baccalaureate degree in Electrical Engi- 
neering from an accredited institution. A grade point average of 3.0 out of 4.0 is 
required for unconditional admission to the Master of Science in Electrical Engi- 
neering program. Provisional admission may be granted to a candidate who pos- 
sesses an accredited undergraduate degree in engineering or in a closely related 
discipline with an overall grade point of at least 2.6 out of 4.0, and has no background 
deficiencies requiring more than twelve semester hours at the undergraduate level. 
Graduate Record Examination scores for Master of Science Degree in Electrical 
Engineering, although not necessary, will be given consideration in making deci- 
sions regarding financial assistance. 

Departmental Requirements 

Two options are offered in the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering pro- 
gram. A minimum of 30 semester hours, including 6 hours of thesis are required for 

67 



the "thesis option," and a minimum of 33 hours, including 3 hours of special projects, 
are required for the "project option." In order to graduate, students are required to 
maintain a grade point average of 3.0 in all graduate (600 and 700) level course work. 
A minimum of 50% of these courses must be at the 700 level. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

General Program Requirement 

Satisfying the minimum requirements described below does not guarantee admis- 
sion. Denial of admission does not necessarily imply a negative evaluation of an 
applicant's qualifications. Limited space and other facilities often force limits on the 
number of students in certain specialties. For details concerning admission re- 
quirements, see "Admission and Other Information" elsewhere in this catalogue. 

Departmental Requirements 

1. Credit-Hour Requirements: A minimum of 24 graduate-level course credits, 
and at least 12 dissertation research credits beyond the master's degree are required. 
It is expected that a significant number of these credits will be in 700-level courses. 
The student is also expected to complete sufficient course credits outside this 
department to acquire additional graduate-level breadth and depth. At least nine 
graduate credits in an area outside electrical engineering are required to satisfy a 
graduate area concentration. 

2. Dissertation Research: There is no limit to the maximum number of disserta- 
tion, research, or special topics credits for Ph.D. students, but no more than 12 
dissertation credits will be counted toward the 36 credit requirement described 
above. These credits alone do not constitute sufficient work at the dissertation/re- 
search level. 

3. Advisory Committee: Each student must form his or her advisory committee 
before or during the semester in which fifteen or more credits are completed toward 
the degree sought. 

4. Membership: All members of the student's advisory committee must be regu- 
lar faculty members of the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Uni- 
versity College of Engineering. They must also be eligible to work with graduate 
students in this College. Others may serve in an ex -officio capacity, and must be 
identified as such on the appointment form. A vita for ex-officio members must be 
attached to the appointment form. A student may submit a written request to change 
the membership of his or her advisory committee at any time. The request is subject 
to the approval of the committee chair, the department Graduate Coordinator, and 
the School of Graduate Studies. 

The advisory committee for a Ph.D. student consists of a chairperson, two other 
members from the Department of Electrical Engineering, and where appropriate, a 
representative from the selected concentration area outside the department. The 
chairman must be selected from the Faculty of the Department of Electrical Engi- 
neering in the area of emphasis chosen by the student. A fifth member, the School of 
Graduate Studies representative, will be appointed by the School of Graduate Stu- 
dies when the Plan of Work is approved. The School of Graduate Studies representa- 
tive attends the preliminary and final oral examinations and must sign the reports of 
those examinations, but does not otherwise participate in directing the student's 
technical work. Ph.D. committees must contain five members. 

5. The Plan of Work: Each graduate student must submit a Plan of Work (PW) to 
the Office of the Electrical Engineering Graduate Coordinator during the term in 
which the student will complete 15 or more credits toward the degree sought. If the 
15 credits will be completed at the end of a regular semester, the Plan of Work must 
be submitted one full week before the beginning of preregistration for the following 



68 



semester. If the 15 credits will be completed at the end of a summer session, the Plan 
of Work must be submitted before registration day for the following semester. The 
Plan of Work shows committee chairperson, other committee members, and a 
sequential list of courses approved by that student's advisor. Each member's signa- 
ture of the Plan of Work denotes their approval for the plan of study. Upon approval 
by the Graduate School, this Plan becomes the students official guide to completing 
their program, and the listed individuals form the official Ph.D. Advisory 
Committee. 

6. Submission of Theses and Dissertations: Upon passing the Ph.D. final oral 
examination, each Ph.D. student must have the thesis or dissertation approved by 
each member of the student's advisory committee. The thesis or dissertation must be 
submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by the deadline given in the academic 
calendar, and must conform to the Guide For Preparation of Thesis and Disserta- 
tions, a copy of which may be obtained from the Electrical Engineering Graduate 
Office. Submission of Thesis and Dissertations to the School of Graduate Studies is by 
appointment only. Telephone numbers to be used for scheduling, and the location for 
turning in the thesis or dissertation, will be made available by the School of Graduate 
Studies. 



Other Information 

See "Regulations for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree" elsewhere in this cata- 
logue for information related to residence requirements, qualifying examination, 
preliminary examination, comprehensive examination, final oral examination, 
admission to candidacy, and time limit. Students should also consult the departmen- 
tal handbook for more details. 



Directory of Electrical Engineering Graduate Faculty 

Ali Abul-Fadl, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Idaho 

Ward J. Collis, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University 

Shanthi Iyer, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., Delhi University; Ph.D., Indian Insti- 
tute of Technology 

John Kelly, Associate Professor; B.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware 

Jung H. Kim, Associate Professor; B.S., Yonsei University; M.S., Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University 

Parag Lala, Research Professor; B.S., University of Dacca; M.S., University of 
Karachi; M.S., Ph.D., City University of London 

Gary L. Lebby, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., 
Clemson University 

Clinton B. Lee, Assistant Professor, B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.S., 
North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Harold L. Martin, Professor; B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic & State University 

Tony L. Mitchell, Professor; B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., 
Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Feodor S. Vainstein, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., Moscow Institute of Electron- 
ics; Ph.D., Boston University 

Alvernon Walker, Assistant Professor; B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Chung Yu, Professor; B.S., McGill University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 



69 



COURSES 

ELEN 602 Semiconductor Theory & Devices 

ELEN 614 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Methods 

ELEN 615 Silicon Device Fabrication Lab. 

ELEN 616 Introduction to Microprocessors 

ELEN 619 Microprocessor Laboratory 

ELEN 627 Switching Theory 

ELEN 629 VLSI Design 

ELEN 630 VLSI Design Laboratory 

ELEN 633 Digital Electronics 

ELEN 636 Balanced Power Systems Analysis I 

ELEN 638 Advanced Power Systems Lab 

ELEN 637 Unbalanced Power Systems at Steady State 

ELEN 642 Solid State Energy Conversion 

ELEN 647 Introduction to Telecommunication Networks 

ELEN 649 Modulation Theory & Communication Systems 

ELEN 650 Digital Signal Processing 

ELEN 656 Probability & Random Process 

ELEN 666 Automatic Control Theory 

ELEN 668 Analog Electronics 

ELEN 672 Network Synthesis 

ELEN 674 Genetic Algorithms 

ELEN 678 Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks 

ELEN 705 Solid State Devices 

ELEN 706 Semiconductor Material and Device Characterization 

ELEN 707 Compound Semiconductor Materials and Devices 

ELEN 709 Solid State Theory 

E LE N 72 1 Fault-Tolerant Digital System Design 

ELEN 723 System Design Using Programmable Logic Devices 

ELEN 727 Digital Systems 

ELEN 729 Computer Methods in Power Systems 

ELEN 736 Power System Control and Protection 

ELEN 737 Computer Methods in Power Systems 

ELEN 740 Advanced Topics in Analog Circuits 

ELEN 746 Electromagnetic Power Generation 

ELEN 747 Telecommunication Networks 

ELEN 748 Information Theory 

ELEN 750 Digital Signal Processing II 

ELEN 756 Optical Electronics 

ELEN 760 Theory of Linear Systems 

ELEN 761 Discrete Time System 

ELEN 762 Network Matrices and Graphs 

ELEN 770 Digital Image Analysis and Computer Vision 

ELEN 777 Thesis 

ELEN 778 Neural Networks Design 

ELEN 780 Machine Vision for Intelligent-Robotics 

ELEN 788 Masters Project 

ELEN 789 Special Topics 

ELEN 799 Ph.D. Dissertation 



70 



ENGINEERING 

Franklin G. King 

Master of Science in Engineering Program Coordinator 

Ronald Helms 

Chairman, Architectural Engineering Department 

Franklin King 

Chairman, Chemical Engineering Department 

Kenneth Murray 

Chairman, Civil Engineering Department 

Gary Lebby 

Acting Chairman, Electrical Engineering Department 

Eui Park 

Chairman, Industrial Engineering Department 

William J. Craft 

Chairman, Mechanical Engineering Department 



The School of Graduate Studies offers a program of study leading to the Master of 
Science in Engineering that involves all engineering areas. Students may obtain the 
M.S.E. degree with thesis, project, or course work options. Because the departments 
of Architectural Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and 
Mechanical Engineering have departmental Master of Science programs, it is likely 
that the M.S.E. will be of interest to 1) graduates of our chemical engineering, civil 
engineering or agricultural engineering curricula whose host departments do not 
have their own graduate programs, 2) students who wish to study subject matter that 
might better be accommodated through the expertise and resources of more than one 
department, or 3) students whose interests may otherwise fall outside other engi- 
neering graduate programs. For admission to the program, students must be 
recommended by one of the engineering programs. 

Degree Offered 

Master of Science in Engineering 

General Requirements 

Regular admission to the Master of Science in Engineering program is granted to 
graduates of ABET/EAC accredited engineering schools and who have attained a 
minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in their overall undergraduate 
program of study. 

A provisional category of admission may also be invoked on a case-by-case basis. 
Persons may be admitted provisionally to the M.S.E. program if any of the following 
conditions apply: 

1. The undergraduate degree is not from an ABET accredited program in 
engineering 

2. The undergraduate degree is not in engineering but is in a closely related 
curriculum with a substantial engineering content. In this case, any defici- 
encies revealed in the undergraduate transcript may be removed by the inclu- 
sion of no more than 12 semester credit hours of appropriate undergraduate 
course content not for graduate credit. 

3. The grade point average is below 3.0, but there is other substantial evidence 
supporting the applicants ability to complete the degree. 



71 



Any provisionally admitted student must earn a minimum grade point average of 
3.0 on his graduate work through the semester that his ninth semester graduate 
course credit occurs. In addition, a "B" grade point average must be earned on all 
non-credit undergraduate courses if any were required as a condition of admission. 
In addition to these provisions, other conditions may be imposed by the sponsoring 
department on a case-by-case basis and must be approved by the Graduate School. 

Students who hold an undergraduate degree but suffer from course deficiencies 
exceeding 12 semester credits can be considered for special student status — 
undergraduate. Persons with massive undergraduate engineering and related defi- 
ciencies even though they hold an undergraduate degree are asked to apply as 
transfer students to the appropriate undergraduate engineering curriculum. 

Upon admission to graduate study, the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies and 
the MSE program coordinator assign an academic advisor from the sponsoring 
department. The course of study planned with the approval of the academic advisor 
is designed to be consistent with the student's engineering interests. 

Graduate Record Examination scores for the Master of Science Degree in Engi- 
neering, although not necessary, will be given consideration in making decisions 
regarding financial assistance. 

Regulations that are option dependent follow: 



Course Work 

This option requires 33 credits of course work approved by the advisor and MSE 
program coordinator. No formal advisory committee is needed. Students wishing to 
receive advanced training without an interest in solving a publishable problem or in 
authorizing a technical report will be attracted to this option. A written comprehen- 
sive examination of six hours duration arranged by the advisor is a requirement. The 
examination follows the general course material of the student set by 3 or more 
examiners out of which one may be the advisor. The student must satisfy the majority 
of examiners to pass the comprehensive examination. The examination is given 
during the student's final semester. 

Project 

This option requires 30 credits of course work and 3 credits of project work 
(Special Projects)— see Courses (approved by the advisor.) The advisor and student 
select a suitable project of mutual interest to both. No formal advisory committee is 
required for this option. 

The project option may interest those who wish to investigate a specific problem 
and write a technical report. Project option students follow the same rules for a final 
comprehensive examination as do course work option students. 

Thesis 

This option requires 24 hours of courses and 6 hours of thesis specifically designed 
for students who wish to investigate a problem in depth and product original publi- 
shable findings under the academic advisor's direction. 

The thesis option is a good preparation for students planning to enter Ph.D. 
programs. For that reason, and because the thesis can be very time consuming, it is a 
very demanding option. In this option, as in others, the advisor and student plan the 
program of study. Unlike the others, this option requires a formal committee chaired 
by the advisor. A minimum of 2 additional faculty members are selected by the 
advisor to serve. This committee must formally judge the thesis content and quality, 
and the thesis defense. In addition, the Graduate Dean requires that the thesis follow 
a specific format established by the School of Graduate Studies. 



72 



Accreditation 

The Master of Science in Engineering degree program is supported by the engi- 
neering administration and faculty of the undergraduate departments. All under- 
graduate engineering degree programs are accredited by the Engineering Accredi- 
tation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. 

Career Opportunities 

The holder of the master of Science in Engineering degree is typically employed in 
an engineering or management position within government and industry. The 
M.S.E. degree, in particular the thesis option, is a good background for persons 
wishing to complete a Ph.D. program. 

Suggested Curriculum Guide 

The curriculum is determined by the student and his/her advisor according to 
interest and degree requirements. The courses that follow address only Chemical, 
Civil and Engineering because topics and courses in other program areas are 
already listed under Architectural, Electrical, Industrial, and Mechanical Engi- 
neering. Those courses may also be part of an M.S.E. program. 



COURSES 







Credit 


Course 


Course Title 


(too- 


lab) 


GEEN 601 


Industrial Automation 




3(2-2) 


GEEN 602 


Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory 




3(0-6) 


GEEN 660 


Selected Topics in Engineering 


Variable 


1-3 


GEEN 666 


Special Projects 


Variable 


1-3 


GEEN 710 


Advanced Transport Phenomena 




(3-0) 


GEEN 720 


Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering 




3(3-0) 


GEEN 730 


Advanced Biochemical Engineering 




3(3-0) 


GEEN 740 


Advanced Chemical Process Design 




3(3-0) 


GEEN 750 


Separation Processes 




3(3-0) 


GEEN 760 


Topics in Molecular Thermodynamics 




3(3-0) 


GEEN 777 


Thesis 


Variable 


1-6 


GEEN 789 


Special Topics 


Variable 


1-3 



(For additional courses, see offerings of Architectural, Electrical, Industrial, and 
Mechanical Engineering.) 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Franklin G. King, Chairman 

Objective 

The objective of the graduate program in Chemical Engineering is to provide 
advanced level study in chemical engineering. The program will serve as prepara- 
tion for further advanced study at the doctoral level or for advanced chemical 
engineering practice in industry. 

Degree Offered 

Master of Science in Engineering with Chemical Engineering option. (MSE - ChE 
option). 



73 



General and Departmental Requirements 

The general requirements for the Master of Science in Engineering program are 
presented with the write up on that program. The MSE-ChE option program has the 
same requirements as the general MSE program with the following exception: the 
MSE-ChE option program provides only the thesis option which requires 24 semes- 
ter hours of course work and 6 hours of thesis culminating in the preparation of a 
thesis on a scholarly research topic. Unconditional admission to the program is 
granted only to students with a BS degree in chemical engineering from an 
ABET/EAC accredited program and with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Admission 
requirements for provisional admission or special student status are outlined in the 
MSE program. 



Directory of Faculty 

Yusuf G. Adewuyi, B.S., Ohio University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Iowa; Associate 

Professor 
Shamsuddin Ilias, B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, 

Dhaka; M.S., University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran; Ph.D., Queen's 

University, Canada, Assistant Professor. 
Vinayak N. Kabadi, B.ChE, Bombay University; M.S., S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo; Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor. 
Franklin G. King, B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Kansas State Univer- 
sity; M.Ed., Howard University; D.Sc, Stevens Institute of Technology; Professor 

and Chairman. 
Keith Schimmel, B.S., Purdue University; M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern University; 

Assistant Professor. 
Gary B. Tatterson, B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Ohio State University; 

Ph.D., Ohio State University; Professor. 



Advanced Undergraduate/Graduate Courses 

Course* Description Credit 

CHEN 600 Advanced Process Control 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 605 Biochemical Engineering 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 610 Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 620 Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 630 Transport Phenomena 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 650 Interfacial Transport Phenomena 3 (3-0) 

*Graduate only or 700 level courses in chemical engineering are listed under the 
MSE program. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Kenneth H. Murray, Chairman 

Objective 

The objectives of Civil Engineering graduate program are to 1) further educate 
civil engineering students at the Master's level, 2) provide Master's level education 
and research opportunities for the civil engineering practitioners in the Piedmont 
Triad area, and 3) improve the teaching capabilities of the faculty through research 
involving graduate students. 



74 



Degree Offered 

Master of Science in Engineering with Civil Engineering option. (MSE-CE 
option). 

General Department Requirements 

The general requirements for the Master of Science in Engineering program are 
presented with the write up on that program. The MSE-CE option program provides 
the thesis or project option. Both options require one Civil Engineering core course 
and two advanced mathematics courses. Twelve hours of the course work must be the 
Civil Engineering courses (listed in the course section). Unconditional admission to 
the program is granted only to students with a BS degree in civil engineering from 
an ABET/EAC accredited program and with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Admission 
requirements for provisional admission or special student status are outlined in the 
MSE program. 

Directory of Faculty 

Shoou-Yuh Chang, B.S., M.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., University of 

North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Illinois; Professor, Graduate Program 

Coordinator. 
Kenneth H. Murray, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University; Chairman and Professor. 
Richard E. Norris, B.S., Washington State University; M.S., D.Eng., University of 

California at Berkeley; Assistant Professor. 
Emmanuel Nzewi, B.S., Michigan Technological University; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue 

University; Assistant Professor. 
M. Reza Salami, B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; 

Ph.D., University of Arizona; Associate Professor. 
Gary S. Spring, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Associate Professor. 



Advanced Undergraduate/Graduate Courses* 

Course Description Credit 

CIEN 600 Expert Systems Applications in Civil Engineering 3(3-0) 

CIEN 602 Civil Engineering Systems Analysis 3(3-0) 

CIEN 610 Water and Wastewater Analysis 3(2-3) 

CIEN 614 Stream Water Quality Modeling 3(3-0) 

CIEN 616 Solid Waste Management 3(3-0) 

CIEN 618 Air Pollution Control 3(3-0) 

CIEN 620 Foundation Design I 3(3-0) 

CIEN 622 Soil Behavior 3(3-0) 

CIEN 624 Seepage and Earth Structures 3(3-0) 

CIEN 626 Soil and Site Improvement 3(3-0) 

CIEN 630 Construction Engineering and Management 3(3-0) 

CIEN 640 Advanced Structural Analysis 3(3-0) 

CIEN 641 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures 3(3-0) 

CIEN 642 Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures 3(3-0) 

CIEN 644 Finite Element Analysis I 3(3-0) 

CIEN 646 Structural Design in Steel 3(3-0) 

CIEN 648 Structural Design in Wood 3(3-0) 

CIEN 650 Geometric Design of Highways 3(3-0) 

CIEN 652 Urban Transportation Planning 3(3-0) 



75 



CIEN 656 Traffic Engineering 3(2-2) 

CIEN 658 Pavement Design 3(3-0) 

CIEN 660 Water Resources System Analysis 3(3-0) 

CIEN 662 Water Resources Engineering 3(2-2) 

CIEN 664 Open Channel Flow 3(3-0) 

CIEN 666 Design of Hydraulic Structures and Machinery 3(3-0) 

CIEN 668 Subsurface Hydrology 3(3-0) 

CIEN 699 Special Projects 3(3-0) 

*700 level graduate courses in Civil Engineering are offered under the MSE 
program. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Eui Park, Chairperson 

Office: 419 McNair Building 

Objectives 

The Master of Science Program in Industrial Engineering is designed to meet the 
need for technical and/or managerial specialists in the Industrial Engineering area 
of concentration. Four areas of concentration (Production and Manufacturing, Sys- 
tems Analysis and Design, Operations Research and Human Factors) are being 
offered. 

Degree Offered 

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering 

General Program Requirements 

The program is open to students with a bachelor's degree in a scientific discipline 
from an institution of recognized standing. Students desiring to enter the program 
who do not possess a bachelor's degree in a scientific discipline are required to 
complete with at least a "B" average a significant number of background courses in 
mathematics, physics and engineering science prior to admission to the graduate 
program. Students entering the program without a bachelor's degree in Industrial 
Engineering from an accredited department are required to remove all deficiencies 
in general professional prerequisites. 

Graduate Record Examination scores for the Master of Science Degree in Indus- 
trial Engineering, although not necessary, will be given consideration in making 
decisions regarding financial assistance. 

Program Options and Degree Requirements 

Three degree options are available, namely, Thesis, Project and Engineering 
Management. The thesis option requires 24 semester hours of course work and 6 
hours of thesis culminating in scholarly research work. The project option requires 
30 semester hours of course work and 3 hours of project work. Both the thesis and 
project option require an oral examination and a written report. The Engineering 
Management is available to working engineers and requires 36 hours of course work. 
To graduate, a student must maintain a 3.0 grade point average. Additional details of 
course requirements are carefully outlined in the Graduate Program Guidelines 
available from the department. 



76 



Typical Plans of Study 
Production and Manufacturing 

INEN-615 Industrial Simulation 
INEN-624 Production Systems 
INEN-650 Operations Research II 
INEN-665 Man/Machine Systems 
INEN-716 Engineering Statistics II 
INEN-632 Robotic Systems and Applications 
INEN-740 Decision Support Systems 
INEN-745 Manufacturing Automation 
INEN-777 Thesis or INEN-788 Project and 



INEN-712 Work Measurement Theory 
INEN-718 Advanced Quality Control 



Credit 

3(3-0) 
3(2-1) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(2-1) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
Credit Variable (1-6) 



3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 



System Analysis and Design 

INEN-615 Industrial Simulation 

INEN-624 Production Systems 

INEN-650 Operations Research II 

INEN-665 Man/Machine Systems 

INEN-716 Engineering Statistics II 

INEN-625 Information Systems 

INEN-740 Decision Support Systems 

INEN-745 Manufacturing Automation 

INEN-777 Thesis or INEN-788 Project and 



3(3-0) 
3(2-1) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
(1-6) 



INEN-621 Engineering Cost Control and Analysis 3(3-0) 
INEN-718 Advanced Quality Control 3(3-0) 



Human Factors 

INEN-615 Industrial Simulation 

INEN-624 Production Systems 

INEN-650 Operations Research II 

INEN-665 Man/Machine Systems 

INEN-716 Engineering Statistics II 

INEN-658 Project Management and Scheduling 

INEN-733 Advanced Operations Research 

INEN-740 Decision Support/System 

INEN-777 Thesis or INEN-788 Project and 

INEN-625 Information Systems 
INEN-718 Advanced Quality Control 



3(3-0) 
3(2-1) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
(1-6) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 



Industrial Engineering Faculty Directory 

Ganelle Grace, B.S., UNC-Chapel Hill; MSIE, North Carolina A&T State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Assistant Professor 

Arup K. Mallik, BSME, Jadavpur University; MSIE, Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University; Professional Engineer; Professor 

Lorace L. Massay, B.Sc, University of West Indies, Trinidad; M.Sc, Cranfield 
Institute of Technology, Silsoe, England; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Rolla; 
Assistant Professor 



77 



Celestine Ntuen, NCE, CRS University; BSIE, MSIE, Ph.D., West Virginia Univer- 
sity, Associate Professor 

Eui Park, B.S., Yonsei University; MSIE, Ph.D., Mississippi State University; 
Associate Professor and Chairperson 

Bala Ram, BSME, MSIE, India Institute of Technology, Madras; Ph.D., State 
University of New York; Professional Engineer; Associate Professor 

Sanjiv Sarin, BSChE, MSIE, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi; Ph.D., State 
University of New York; Professional Engineer; Associate Professor 

Silvanus J. Udoka, B.S., Weber State University, Ogden, UT; MSIE, Ph.D., Okla- 
homa State University; Assistant Professor; Rm 402, McNair Hall. 



Courses 

INEN-615 Industrial Simulation 

INEN-621 Engineering Cost Control and Analysis 

INEN-624 Production Systems 

INEN-625 Information Systems 

INEN-632 Robotic Systems and Applications 

INEN-635 Materials Handling Systems Design 

INEN-645 Advanced Facilities Design 

INEN-650 Operations Research II 

INEN-658 Project Management and Scheduling 

INEN-662 Reliability 

INEN-664 Safety Engineering 

INEN-665 Man/Machine Systems 

INEN-666 Special Projects 

INEN-678 Engineering Management 

INEN-716 Engineering Statistics II 

INEN-718 Advanced Quality Control 

INEN-730 Industrial Dynamics 

INEN-733 Advanced Operations Research 

INEN-735 Human-Computer Interface 

INEN-745 Manufacturing Automation 

INEN-777 Thesis 

INEN-778 Research 

INEN-789 Special Topics 



Credit 

3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(2-1) 
3(2-2) 

3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
Credit Variable (1-3) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
Credit Variable (1-6) 
Credit Variable (1-3) 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
William J. Craft, Chairperson 

Objectives of the Programs 

The objective of graduate study in Mechanical Engineering is to provide advanced 
level study in mechanical engineering in four distinct areas of specialization. The 
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering is designed to prepare the graduate 
for Ph.D. level studies or for advanced mechanical engineering practice in industry, 
consulting, or government service. The Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering 
provides both advanced instruction and independent research opportunities for 
students. The Ph.D. degree is the highest academic degree offered, and graduates 
typically are employed in research environments in government laboratories and 
industries, and as university faculty. 



78 



Degrees Offered 

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) 
Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 



Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Program Description 

The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering is graduate-level program 
comprised of advanced classroom and independent study courses in mechanics and 
materials, the thermal sciences, design and manufacturing, and aerospace. 

Admission to the MSME Program 

The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering Program is open to students 
with a Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering or a closely related field from 
an institution of recognized standing. In order to pursue a graduate degree in 
Mechanical Engineering, an applicant must first be admitted to the School of 
Graduate Studies. The initial step toward graduate admission is to complete the 
required application forms and submit them to the School of Graduate Studies 
Office. In addition to the application forms, two copies of the student's undergraduate 
and/or graduate transcript(s) and two recommendation letters are required. Process- 
ing of applications cannot be guaranteed unless they are received, with all support- 
ing documents and application fee payment, in the School of Graduate Studies. 
Applicants should note all application deadline dates. Submission of application 
materials after the deadline for applications will delay consideration by one or more 
academic semesters. Foreign Nationals are encouraged to apply at least two months 
in advance of each admission deadline date. Foreign Nationals must also file a 
Financial Certification Form and Certification of Sources of Funds and Amounts. 
Specific information regarding visa and immigration requirements can be obtained 
from the Office of International and Minority Student Affairs, North Carolina A&T 
State University, Murphy Hall, Room 221, Greensboro, NC 27411. Application 
packages may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies Office, Room 122, 
Gibbs Hall, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411. 

Applicants may be admitted to the MSME Program under three categories: 
Unconditional Admission, Conditional Admission, or Special Student (Undergrad- 
uate) Admission. Details follow: 

1. Unconditional Admission — An applicant may be given unconditional admission 
to the MSME Program if he/she possesses a MSME, degree from an ABET 
(Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) accredited institution, 
with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale. 

Students admitted on an unconditional basis are also expected to have com- 
pleted "key courses" below as part of their prior undergraduate program. 

Undergraduate Courses Required 

Calculus (minimum of 8 semester hours) Statics 

Differential Equations Dynamics 

Applied Engineering Mathematics Strength of Materials 

Physics (minimum of 6 semester hours) Materials Science 

Chemistry Thermodynamics 

Fortran Programming Fluid Mechanics 

Introductory Numerical Methods Machine Design or Equivalent 



79 



Additional undergraduate course requirements for Specialization in Mechanics 
and Materials: three credits of Advanced Materials 

Additional undergraduate course required for Specialization in Thermal Scien- 
ces: three credits of Heat Transfer 

Additional undergraduate courses required for Specialization in Design and 
Manufacturing: three credits of Kinematics and three credits of Manufacturing 
Processes 

2. Provisional Admission — Applicants may be granted conditional admission if 
they do not qualify for unconditional admission due to one or more of the following 
reasons: 

a. Applicant has a baccalaureate mechanical engineering degree from a non- 
ABET accredited program. Undergraduate engineering degrees from for- 
eign universities fall into this category. 

b. Applicant has a baccalaureate degree in engineering but is deficient in key 
background courses listed in the previous section. THese deficiencies must not 
exceed 12 credit hours. 

c. Applicant has an undergraduate degree which is not in engineering but is in a 
closely related curriculum with a substantial engineering science content. 
Background deficiencies should not exceed 12 credit hours. 

d. Applicant's undergraduate grade point average is below that required for 
unconditional admission but there is also academic evidence that the student 
will successfully complete the degree. 

Provisional admission status will be changed to unconditional when the student 
has satisfied the two conditions below: 

a. All required course deficiencies have been completed with a 3.0 GPA or above 
and 

b. A minimum of a 3.0 GPA is attained on A&T courses taken for graduate credit 
at the end of the semester in which the 9th semester credit is completed. 

Failure to move to unconditional admission when first eligible will result in 
the student's being subject to probation policies. Other admission conditions 
and program requirements may be imposed on a case-by-case basis as 
approved by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

Provisional admission status is the minimum level of graduate admission classifi- 
cation. In this classification, students are eligible to register for 700-level courses, 
provided such courses are approved by the academic advisor. 

3. Special Student (Undergraduate) — Special student admission implies that the 
student does not meet the above requirements for graduate admission in engi- 
neering. Students who hold an undergraduate degree but have course work 
deficiencies exceeding 12 credits may fall in the Special Student category. This 
category is reserved for candidates who, in spite of deficiencies in excess of 12 
credits, show high potential, and will be able to remove these deficiencies in one 
calendar year of full-time study. 

Special Student (Undergraduate) status will be changed to provisional admission 
status when the student: 

a. reduces the number of deficiencies to 12 credits or less, 

b. achieves a GPA of 3.0 or more in courses completed to remove deficiencies, and 

c. obtains an average grade of 3.0 or more in graduate courses completed. 



80 



Persons admitted as special students are limited to no more than to six 600 level 
graduate credits while in this category — See Transfer of Credit below. Students 
classified under the Special Student (Undergraduate) category are subject to the 
undergraduate academic policies in effect at the time of admission. 



Change of Admission Status 

It is the student's responsibility to apply to the School of Graduate Studies for a 
change in admission status. Students who fail to have their status upgraded run the 
risk of not receiving graduate credit for any completed graduate courses. Such 
students also run the risk of academic probation and dismissal. 



Program Options 

1. Coursework Option 

This option consists of thirty-three (33) semester hours of course work. It is 
intended for students who are either concurrently working in an engineering 
capacity or who have considerable engineering experience. Successful comple- 
tion of the comprehensive examination is a degree requirement. Approval must 
be obtained from the Graduate Program Coordinator to elect the coursework 
option. A Coursework Option student must also take at least five courses from 
her/his specialization area or in a related area as specified by the academic 
advisor. A candidate who chooses the coursework option must select a permanent 
advisor who will direct the course of study and who will plan the Final Compre- 
hensive Examination. The advisor may also be part of the group of examiners who 
conduct the Final Comprehensive Examination. A candidate who selects this 
option does not have a formal advising committee. See pages 39 and 40 for a list of 
courses by specialization. 



Comprehensive Examination (Coursework Option) 

Candidates who elect the coursework option must sit for a written comprehensive 
examination of six (6) hours duration, prepared as three independent two-hour 
examinations. A student must have completed at least twenty-one (21) hours of 
course work to be eligible to take the comprehensive examination. 

One week each semester, at least forty-five (45) days prior to the end of the 
semester, will be designated as Comprehensive Examination Week. All students 
wishing to take the examination must do so during this period. 

Applications to take the examination must be submitted by the academic advisor 
to the Graduate Program Coordinator at least thirty (30) days prior to the sche- 
duled beginning date of the examination. The student must initiate this process 
by contacting his/her advisor with an examination request. 

The application should contain a description of the subject areas to be covered by 
the exam. In consultation with the academic advisor, the Graduate Coordinator 
assigns an appropriate group of examiners as well as a test time and date. The 
Graduate Program Coordinator will organize the examination to arrange for as 
much "common" testing as possible based on material relating to the student's 
course work. 



81 



The candidate must achieve a satisfactory score in at least two (2) sessions of the 
examination. A candidate who fails to achieve a satisfactory score at the first 
attempt may sit again in the next regularly scheduled Comprehensive Examina- 
tion Week, generally in the following semester. A Candidate who fails a second 
time must petition the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies for permission to sit 
again. An unfavorable decision will result in dismissal from the program. A third 
failure will always result in dismissal from the program. 

2. Project and Thesis Options 

The Project Option consists of thirty (30) semester hours of course work and three 
(3) hours of special project. It is intended for students with substantial engineer- 
ing experience but who do not wish to do a full Master's thesis. Project Option 
students must take three hours of MEEN-766 Graduate Projects. An oral exami- 
nation project defense/examination is required. 

The Thesis Option consists of twenty-four (24) semester hours of course work and 
six (6) hours of thesis. Thesis Option students must take six hours of MEEN-777 
Thesis. An original research topic must be chosen in conjunction with the 
student's advisor culminating in the preparation of a scholarly thesis. An 

oral thesis defense/examination is required. This option is intended for students 
with strong research interests who may desire to pursue further graduate studies 
towards a Ph.D. degree. 

A candidate who chooses the thesis or project option must consult with the advisor 
for assistance in the selection of a committee comprised of 3-5 faculty members. 
This committee serves in the capacity of an impartial second source of a profes- 
sional review of the quality of the student's work and, in conjunction with the 
academic advisor, assists in defining the thesis or project topic area. The commit- 
tee also conducts the student's oral defense of the student's project or thesis work. 
The candidate must select the members of the committee before the completion of 
twenty-one (21) graduate credit hours. A form specifying the student's committee 
must be filed with the School of Graduate Studies through the advisor and 
Graduate Program Coordinator. 

Oral Defense (Project or Thesis Option) 

The candidate who elects the thesis or project option must face an oral examination 
which is scheduled by the advisor. An affirmative vote by majority of the committee 
after the oral examination is necessary for the student to pass. 

The oral exam is scheduled after the thesis or project report has been reviewed by 
each member of the committee and approved with recommended changes. During 
the examination the candidate will answer questions on thesis, project or major 
coursework. The exam is a public meeting; the committee deliberation following the 
meeting is open only to committee members. At the deliberation the committee will 
decide to pass or fail the student or to continue the oral defense at another date. 

Academic Specializations 

Four areas of academic specialization are offered at the Master's level in Mechani- 
cal Engineering: (1) Mechanics and Materials, (2) Energy and Thermal/Fluid Sys- 
tems, (3) Design and Manufacturing, and (4) Aerospace. MSME students in each 
specialization area must complete both the mathematics course sequence and the 
common courses sequence outlined below: 

Mathematics Course Sequence: 

Students must select one of the following two 

1) MEEN-618 Numerical Analysis for Engineering, 



82 



2) any MATH-6xx or MATH-7xx course specified by the Academic 
Advisor. 

Common Course Sequence: 

Each MSME student must take three of the following five courses: 

MEEN-626 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 

MEEN-706 Theory of Vibrations 

MEEN-716 Finite Element Methods 

MEEN-731 Conduction Heat Transfer and 

MEEN-789 Special Topics in Instrumentation. 

All other courses required to complete the student's MSME degree must be 
selected in consultation with the student's academic advisor. 



The Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering 

Program Description 

The Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering provides both doctoral-level instruc- 
tion and independent research opportunities for students. The Ph.D. degree is the 
highest academic degree offered, and graduates typically are employed in research 
environments in government laboratories and industries, and as University faculty. 

The Ph.D. degree program is highly individualistic in nature, and the student is 
expected to make a significant contribution to the reservoir of human knowledge by 
investigating a significant topic within the domain of mechanical engineering. A 
successful dissertation is the expected outcome of the degree program. The Ph.D. 
student must rely heavily on the guidance of the academic advisor and on the 
academic committee in formulating a plan of work, in setting and meeting the 
degree goals, and in selecting a dissertation problem. The academic advisor serves to 
guide the student during the dissertation study phase of the program. 

For details concerning admission requirements, see "Admission and Other Infor- 
mation" elsewhere in this catalog. 



Ph.D. Program Policies and Requirements 

The doctorate symbolizes the ability of the recipient to undertake original research 
and scholarly work of the highest levels without supervision. The degree is therefore 
not granted simply upon completion of a stated amount of course work but rather 
upon demonstration by the student of a comprehensive knowledge and high attain- 
ment in scholarship in a specialized field of study. As a guide however, the student is 
expected generally to have completed at least twenty-four course credits beyond the 
master's degree and a minimum of twelve dissertation credits. The student must 
demonstrate both the attainment of scholarship and independent study in a special- 
ized field of study by writing a dissertation reporting the results of an original 
investigation. The student must pass a series of comprehensive examinations in the 
field of specialization and related areas of knowledge and defend successfully the 
quality, methodology, findings, and significance of the dissertation. 

Advisory Committee and Plan of Graduate Work 

An advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom 
will be designated as chair, will be appointed by the Dean of Graduate School upon 
the recommendation of the Chairperson of the department. The committee, which 
must include at least one representative of the minor field, will, with the student, 
prepare a Plan of Graduate Study which must be approved by the department and 
the School of Graduate Studies. In addition to the course work to be undertaken, the 



83 



subject of the student's dissertation must appear on the plan; and any subsequent 
changes in committee or subject or in the overall plan must be submitted for appro- 
val as with the original plan. 

The program of study must be unified, and all constituent parts must contribute to 
an organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected from groups 
embracing one principal subject of concentration, the major, and from a cognate 
field, the minor. Normally, a student will select the minor work from a single 
discipline or field which, in the judgement of the advisory committee, provides 
relevant support to the major field. However, when the advisory committee finds 
that the needs of the student will be best served by work in an interdisciplinary 
minor, it has the alternative of developing a special program in lieu of the usual 
minor. 

CO-MAJOR 

There is currently an approved doctoral level program of study, on campus, only in 
electrical engineering. Students may currently co-major through it or through the 
interinstitutional Ph.D. program. This would require the approval of both depart- 
ments in the College of Engineering or through both university campuses, and 
approval of the students combined advisory committee. Co-majors must meet all 
requirements for majors in both departments. Only one degree is awarded and the 
co-major is noted on transcript. A co-major must involve degree programs with 
similar requirements. Co-majors are not permitted between Doctorate-level and 
lower level programs. 

OTHER INFORMATION 

See "Regulations for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree" elsewhere in this cata- 
logue for information related to residence requirements, qualifying examination, 
preliminary examination, comprehensive examination, final oral examination, 
admission to candidacy, and time limit. Students should also consult the departmen- 
tal handbook for more details. 

THE DISSERTATION 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results if the student's original investigation 
in the field of major interest. It must be a contribution to knowledge, be adequately 
supported by data and be written in a manner consistent with the highest standards 
of scholarship. Publication is expected. 

The dissertation will be reviewed by all members of the advisory committee and 
must receive their approval prior to submission to the School of Graduate Studies. 
Three copies of the document signed by all members of the student's advisory 
committee must be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by a specified 
deadline in the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. 
Prior to final approval, the dissertation will be reviewed by the School of Graduate 
Studies to ensure that the format conforms to its specifications. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be microfilmed by 
the University Microfilms International, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, which includes 
publication of the abstract in Dissertation Abstracts International. The student is 
required to pay for the microfilming service. 



84 



Directory of Faculty 

V. Sarma Awa, B.S., Saugor University; DMIT, Madras Institute of Technology; 

M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Pro- 
fessor 
Suresh Chandra, B.S., Banaras Hindu University; M.S., University of Louisville; 

Ph.D., Colorado State University; Research Professor 
Rajinder S. Chauhan, B.S., Guru Nanak Engineering College; M.T., Indian Institute 

of Technology; Ph.D., Auburn University; Assistant Professor 
John C. Chen, B.S., University of Virginia; M.S. & Ph.D., Stanford University; 

Assistant Professor 
William J. Craft, P.E.; B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S. & Ph.D., Clemson 

University; Professor and Chairperson 
DeRome 0. Dunn, B.S. & M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Virgi- 
nia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Assistant Professor 
George J. Filatovs, B.S., Washington University; Ph.D., University of Missouri at 

Rolla, Professor 
Meldon Human, B.S., Northwestern University; M.S. & Ph.D., Stanford University; 

Associate Professor 
Kenneth M. Jones, B.S., M.S., & Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Assistant 

Professor 
Ajit D. Kelkar, B.S., Poona University; M.S., South Dakota State University; Ph.D., 

Old Dominion University; Associate Professor 
David E. Klett, P.E.; B.S., Michigan State University, M.S. & Ph.D., University of 

Florida; Professor 
Tony C. Min, P.E.; B.S., Chiao Tung University; M.S. & Ph.D., University of Tennes- 
see; Professor Emeritus 
Samuel P. Owusu-Ofori,P.E.; B.S., University of Science and Technology— Kumasi, 

Ghana; M.S., Bradley University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison; 

Professor 
Devdas M. Pai, P.E.; B.S., Indian Institute of Technology, Madras; M.S. & Ph.D., 

Arizona State University; Associate Professor 
P. Frank Pai, B,.S., Tamkang University; M.S., National Taiwan University; Ph.D., 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Assistant Professor 
Japannathan Sankar, B.E., University of Madras; M.E., Concordia University; 

Ph.D., Lehigh University; Professor 
Lonnie Sharpe, Jr., P.E.; B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., North 

Carolina State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois-Urbana, Champaign; 

Associate Professor and Interim Dean 
K. N. Shivakumar; B.E., Bangalore University; M.E. & Ph.D., Indian Institute of 

Science; Research Professor 
Mark J. Schulz, B.T., M.S., & Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; 

Assistant Professor 
Shih-Liang Wang, P.E.; B.S., National Tsing Hua University; M.S. & Ph.D., Ohio 

State University; Associate Professor 



85 



Graduate Courses Listed By Specialization 

Course Number Course Title 

General 

MEEN 618 Numerical Analysis for Engineers 

MEEN 660 Selected Topics in Engineering 

MEEN 702 Continuum Mechanics 

MEEN 766 Graduate Projects 

MEEN 777 Thesis 

MEEN 788 Research 

MEEN 789 Special Topics 

Aerospace 

MEEN 651 Flight Vehicle Structures II 

MEEN 652 Aero Vehicle Stability and Control 

MEEN 653 Aero Vehicle Flight Dynamics 

MEEN 654 Advanced Propulsion 

Mechanics and Materials 

MEEN 602 Advanced Strength of Materials 

MEEN 604 Intermediate Dynamics 

MEEN 608 Experimental Stress Analysis 

MEEN 610 Theory of Elasticity 

MEEN 612 Modern Composite Materials 

MEEN 614 Mechanics of Engineering Modeling 

MEEN 650 Mechanical Properties and Structure of Solids 

MEEN 657 Strengthening Mechanisms in Commercial Materials 

MEEN 704 Advanced Dynamics 

MEEN 706 Theory of Vibrations 

MEEN 707 Real Time Analysis of Dynamic Systems 

MEEN 708 Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics 

MEEN 710 Advanced Theory of Elasticity 

MEEN 712 Theory of Elastic Stability 

MEEN 714 Mathematical Theory of Plasticity 

MEEN 716 Finite Element Methods 

MEEN 747 Computational Engineering Dynamics 

MEEN 750 Phase Equilibria 

MEEN 752 Mechanics Properties and Theories of Failure 

MEEN 754 Deformation Analysis and Metal Processing 

MEEN 756 Physical Metallurgy of Industrial Alloys 

MEEN 758 Mechanical Metallurgy 

Energy and Thermal/Fluid Systems 

MEEN 626 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 

MEEN 655 Computational Fluid Dynamics 

MEEN 656 Bounary Layer Theory 

MEEN 720 Advanced Classical Thermodynamics 

MEEN 722 Statistical Thermodynamics 

MEEN 724 Irreversible Thermodynamics 

MEEN 731 Conduction Heat Transfer 

MEEN 732 Convection Heat Transfer 

MEEN 733 Radiation Heat Transfer 

MEEN 734 Special Topics in Applied Heat Transfer 

MEEN 738 Solar Thermal Energy Systems 



86 



Design and Manufacturing 

MEEN 619 Computer-Aided Design of Mechanical Systems 

MEEN 642 Materials Joining 

MEEN 645 Aluminum Product Design and Manufacturing 

MEEN 646 Advanced Manufacturing Processes 

MEEN 647 Computational Advanced Mechanism Design 

MEEN 648 Computer Controlled Manufacturing 

MEEN 649 Design of Robot Manipulators 

MEEN 719 Advanced Computer-Aided Design 

MEEN 740 Machine Tool Design 

MEEN 742 Tools, Jigs, and Fixtures 

MEEN 746 Stochastic Modeling of Mechanical Systems 

MEEN 748 Numerical Control in Manufacturing 

MEEN 749 Computer Control of Robot Manipulators 



Department of Mechanical Engineering Course Listings 
Courses Open to Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students 

Course Title 

Advanced Strength of Materials 

Intermediate Dynamics 

Experimental Stress Analysis 

Theory of Elasticity 

Modern Composite Materials 

Mechanics of Engineering Modeling 

Numerical Analysis for Engineers 

Computer-Aided Design of Mechanical Systems 

Advanced Fluid Dynamics 

Materials Joining 

Aluminum Product Design and Manufacturing 

Advanced Manufacturing Processes 

Advanced Mechanism Design 

Computer Controlled Manufacturing 

Design of Robot Manipulators 

Mechanical Properties and Structure of Solids 

Flight Vehicle Structures 

Aero Vehicle Stability and Control 

Aero Vehicle Flight Dynamics 

Advanced Propulsion 

Computational Fluid Dynamics 

Boundary Layer Theory 

Strengthening Mechanisms in Commercial Materials 

Selected Topics in Engineering 



Course Number 


MEEN 602 


MEEN 604 


MEEN 608 


MEEN 610 


MEEN 612 


MEEN 614 


MEEN 618 


MEEN 619 


MEEN 626 


MEEN 642 


MEEN 645 


MEEN 646 


MEEN 647 


MEEN 648 


MEEN 649 


MEEN 650 


MEEN 651 


MEEN 652 


MEEN 653 


MEEN 654 


MEEN 655 


MEEN 656 


MEEN 657 


MEEN 660 



Courses open only to Graduate Students 

Course Number Course Title 

MEEN 702 Continuum Mechanics 

MEEN 704 Advanced Dynamics 

MEEN 706 Theory of Vibrations 

MEEN 707 Real Time Analysis of Dynamic Systems 

MEEN 708 Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics 

MEEN 710 Advanced Theory of Elasticity 

MEEN 712 Theory of Elastic Stability 

MEEN 714 Mathematical Theory of Plasticity 



87 



MEEN 716 Finite Element Methods 

MEEN 719 Advanced Computer-Aided Design 

MEEN 720 Advanced Classical Thermodynamics 

MEEN 722 Statistical Thermodynamics 

MEEN 724 Irreversible Thermodynamics 

MEEN 731 Conduction Heat Transfer 

MEEN 732 Convection Heat Transfer 

MEEN 733 Radiation Heat Transfer 

MEEN 734 Special Topics in Applied Heat Transfer 

MEEN 738 Solar Thermal Energy Systems 

MEEN 740 Machine Tool Design 

MEEN 742 Tools, Jigs, and Fixtures 

MEEN 746 Stochastic Modeling of Mechanical Systems 

MEEN 747 Computational Engineering Dynamics 

MEEN 748 Numerical Control in Manufacturing 

MEEN 749 Computer Control of Robot Manipulators 

MEEN 750 Phase Equilibria 

MEEN 752 Mechanics Properties and Theories of Failure 

MEEN 754 Deformation Analysis and Metal Processing 

MEEN 756 Physical Metallurgy of Industrial Alloys 

MEEN 758 Mechanical Metallurgy 

MEEN 766 Graduate Projects 

MEEN 777 Thesis 

MEEN 788 Research 

MEEN 789 Special Topics 



ENGLISH 

Jimmy L. Williams, Chairperson 

Office: 202 Crosby Hall 

Objectives 

The objectives of the English Department are to provide in-depth training in 
English-Education, English, American, and Afro- American literature, folklore and 
language. 



Degrees Offered 

English and Afro- American Literature 
English Education — M.S. 



M.A. 



Requirements for Admission to the M.A. Program in English and Afro-American 
Literature and the M.S. Program in English Education 

All applicants to the M.A. program must have earned a bachelor's degree from a 
four-year college. Applicants must also have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
(24) undergraduate hours in English. The hours must include at least three semester 
hours of Shakespeare, three of American literature, three of English literature, 
three of world literature or contemporary literature, three of advanced grammar, 
and three of advanced composition. 

A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to satisfy the 
requirements by enrolling in undergraduate courses before beginning graduate 
studies in English. 

Scores for the verbal sections of the GRE general test and for the GRE Literature 
and English test must be submitted for consideration as a part of the admission 
process. 



88 



Application forms may be obtained from the office of the Graduate School and 
must be completed and returned to the Graduate Office. Two (2) official transcripts 
of previous undergraduate or graduate records and three (3) letters of recommenda- 
tion must be forwarded to the Graduate Office before action can be taken on the 
application. An applicant may be admitted to the program unconditionally, provi- 
sionally, or as a special student. 

Unconditional Admission. To qualify for unconditional admission to the M.A. 
program, an applicant must have earned an overall average of 3.00 on a four-point 
system (or 2.00 on a three-point system) in undergraduate studies. 

Provisional Admission. An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies on a 
provisional basis if (1) the record of undergraduate preparation reveals deficiencies 
that can be removed near the beginning of graduate study or (2) lacking the required 
grade point average for unconditional admission, the applicant may become eligible 
by successfully completing the first nine (9) hours of course work with a 3.00 or better 
average. Students admitted provisionally may also be required to pass examinations 
to demonstrate their knowledge in certain areas or to take special undergraduate 
courses to improve their background. A minimum grade of 2.6 in undergraduate 
work is required for provisional admission. 

Special Students. Students not seeking the M.A. or M.S. degree may be admitted in 
order to take courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificates. If 
the student subsequently wishes to pursue the M.A. or M.S. program, he or she must 
request an evaluation of the work. Under no circumstances may the student apply 
toward a degree program more than twelve (12) hours earned as a special student. 

M.A. and M.S. Degree Requirements 

Except for the foreign language requirement and the professional education 
courses, the program requirements are the same for the M.S. in Education-English 
as they are for the M.A. in English and Afro-American Literature. A reading 
knowledge of French, German, or Spanish is required for the M.A. degree. 

Total Hours Required. The M.A. and M.S. programs consist of two distinct and 
parallel elements. The student may elect to take twenty-seven (27) hours of course 
work and write a thesis for three (3) hours credit in order to satisfy the thirty-hour 
minimum requirement. The student may also elect not to write a thesis and take an 
additional three (3) hours of course work in order to satisfy the thirty-hour minimum 
requirement. Three courses are required: English 754 — History and Structure of 
the English Language, English 753 — Literary Research and Bibliography, and 
English 700 — Literary Analysis and Criticism. The student must take twelve (12) 
hours in Afro-American Literature. 

Approximately fifty percent of the courses offered each semester will be open only 
to graduate students. These courses are on the 700 level. Students enrolled in both 
programs must complete fifteen (15) hours of course work at the 700 level. Students 
in the M.S. program may apply 700 level professional education courses toward 
meeting this requirement. All 600 level courses are open to both undergraduate and 
graduate students. 

Grades Required. Students in the M.A. program must maintain a 3.00 average in 
order to satisfy the grade requirements of the program. If a student receives a C or 
lower in more than two (2) courses, he or she will be dropped from the program. 

Amount of Credit Accepted for Transfer. The Graduate School will accept six (6) 
semester hours of transfer credit from another institution for those students enrolled 
in degree programs. 

Other Requirements (Comprehensive and Thesis Examinations). For the M.A. and 
M.S. degrees, students must pass a three (3) hour written comprehensive examina- 
tion administered by the English Department. The comprehensive examination will 
cover only material to which the student has been exposed in course work at A. and T. 
The comprehensive may be taken twice. An additional comprehensive examination 



89 



in education is required of persons pursuing the M.S. degree. Those students who 
elect to write a thesis must meet the deadlines projected by the Graduate School in 
addition to standing a one-hour oral examination which constitutes a defense of the 
thesis. The defense may be attempted twice. 

Career Opportunities 

Both the M. A. and M.S. degrees prepare students to pursue graduate study for the 
doctorate in English and related fields. The M.S. prepares one to teach on the 
secondary and college levels. The M.A. degree is designed primarily to prepare one 
for college teaching and for admission to doctoral programs. 

Curriculum Guide for M.A. Degree 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

1. Required: English 700, 753, 754 

2. Twelve (12) hrs. from: English 650, 652, 654, 656, 658, 660, 760, 762, 764, 766 

3. Nine (9) hrs. from: English 603, 620, 628, 662, 702, 704, 720, 749, 750, 751, 752, 
770, 775 

4. Foreign Language: Demonstrated proficiency in French, Spanish, or German. 
Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

1. Required: English 700, 753, 754 

2. Nine to twelve (9-12) hrs. from: English 650, 652, 654, 658, 660, 760, 762, 764, 
766 

3. Nine (9) hrs. from: English 603, 620, 628, 662, 702, 704, 720, 749, 750, 751, 752, 
755, 770 

4. Foreign Language: Demonstrated proficiency in French, Spanish, or German. 

5. Thesis Research: English 775, 3 semester hours 

Curriculum Guide for M.S. Degree 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. English 700, 753, 754 

2. Fifteen semester hours selected from the following: English 603, 620, 628, 650, 
652, 654, 656, 658, 660, 662, 702, 704, 749, 750, 751, 752, 755, 760, 762, 764, 766 

3. Six semester hours of professional education courses. The recommended 
courses are CUIN 701 or CUIN 720 and HUDS 726. 

Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. English 700, 753, 754 

2. 12 semester hours selected from the following: 603, 620, 628, 650, 652, 654, 658, 
660, 662, 702, 704, 720, 749, 750, 751, 752, 755, 760, 762, 764, 766, 770 

3. Thesis Research: English 775, 3 semester hours 

Directory of Faculty and Courses 

Jimmy L. Williams, B.A., Clark College; M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., In- 
diana University; Professor and Chair 

Brian Benson, A.B., Guilford College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro; Ph.D., University of South Carolina; Professor 

Norman Jarrard, A.B., Salem College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; Ph.D., University of Texas; Professor 

Michael Greene, B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University; Associate 
Professor 

Robert Levine, B.A., Queens College of the City University of New York; M.A., 
Ph.D., Cornell University; Professor 



90 



Ethel Taylor, A.B., Spelman College; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Indiana 

University; Professor 
Sandra Alexander, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., Harvard 

University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Professor 
Elon Kulii, B.A., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. 

State University; Ph.D., Indiana University; Associate Professor 



Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ENGL-600 Language Variations in American English 

ENGL-603 Introduction to Folklore. 

ENGL-620 Elizabethan Drama 

ENGL-626 Children's Literature 

ENGL-627 Literature for Adolescents 

ENGL-628 The American Novel 

ENGL-650 Afro-American Folklore 

ENGL-652 Afro-American Drama 

ENGL-654 Afro- American Novel I 

ENGL-656 Afro-American Novel II 

ENGL-658 Afro-American Poetry I 

ENGL-660 Afro-American Poetry II 

ENGL-662 History of American Ideas 

ENGL-672 Independent Study in English 

Graduate Courses, open only to graduate students 

ENGL-700 Literary Analysis and Criticism 

ENGL-702 Milton 

ENGL-704 Eighteenth Century English Literature 

ENGL-710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers I 

ENGL-711 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers II 

ENGL-720 Studies in American Literature 

ENGL-749 Romantic Prose and Poetry of England 

ENGL-750 Victorian Literature 

ENGL-751 Modern British and Continental Fiction 

ENGL-752 Restoration and 18th Century Drama 

ENGL-753 Literary Research and Bibliography 

ENGL-754 History and Structure of the English Language 

ENGL-755 Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rhetoric 

ENGL-760 Non-Fiction by Afro- American Writers 

ENGL-762 Short Fiction by Afro-American Writers 

ENGL-764 Black Aesthetics 

ENGL-766 Seminar in Afro-American Literature and Language 

ENGL-770 Seminar 

ENGL-775 Thesis Research 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Nita M. Dewberry, Interim Chairperson 

Office: 104 Crosby Hall 

Objectives 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers graduate work leading to the Mas- 
ter of Science degree with a concentration in French. The program is designed for 
persons desirous of post-baccalaureate training and experiences in French teaching, 
language and literature. 



91 



Degree Offered 

Master of Science Degree in French— M.S. 

Requirements for Admission to the Program: M.S. Program in French 

An applicant must satisfy the general requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School. An applicant must have earned a minimum of twenty-four (24) hours in 
French on the undergraduate level. 

In order to qualify for unconditional admission to the program in French, an 
applicant must have earned an overall grade point average of 3.00 on a four-point 
system in undergraduate studies. 

An applicant may be admitted to the program on a provisional basis as stated in the 
Graduate School's Bulletin under Provisional Admission and with the consent of 
the Department of Foreign Languages. 

Persons not seeking the M.S. degree in French may be admitted as a Special 
Student in order to take courses for self-improvement in French. 

All students are required to take the GRE as an admissions requirement for this 
program. 

Requirements for a Degree in French 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. French 720 and 724. 

2. 12 additional s.h. in graduate-level courses in French. 

3. 3 hours of electives. 

4. Thesis Research. 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. French 720 and 724. 

2. 12 additional s.h. in graduate-level French courses. 

3. 3 hours of electives in education, French, or courses related to French. 

FRENCH 

Courses Offered For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

FOLA-602 Second Language Teaching and Learning (Formerly Problems and 

Trends in Foreign Language) 
FOLA-603 Oral Course for Teachers of Foreign Languages (Formerly French 

502) 
FOLA-606 Research in the Teaching of Foreign Languages (Formerly French 

503, 2573) 
FOLA-607 French Literature of the Seventeenth Century (Formerly 

French 302, 2574) 
FOLA-608 French Literature in the Eighteenth Century (Formerly French 

303, 2575) 
FOLA-609 French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (Formerly French 

304, 2576) 
FOLA-610 The French Theatre (Formerly French 504, 2577) 
FOLA-612 The French Novel (Formerly French 505, 2578) 
FOLA-614 French Syntax (Formerly French 506, 2579) 
FOLA-616 Contemporary French Literature (Formerly French 305 

and 2542, 2580) 



92 



Graduate Courses, open only to graduate students 

FOLA-720 Advanced Reading and Composition (Formerly 601 and 2580, 2585) 
FOLA-722 Romantic Movement in France (1820-1848) (Formerly 602 

and 2581, 2856) 
FOLA-724 Seminar in Foreign Languages (Formerly 603 and 2582, 2587) 
FOLA-726 Contemporary Literary Criticism (Formerly 604 and 2583, 2588) 
FOLA-728 Independent Study in Foreign Languages (Formerly 258, 2589) 

Directory of Faculty 

Carl Henderson, B.A., Morehouse College; M.A., Case Western Reserve University; 
Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University; Associate Professor; Coordinator of 
Graduate Studies in French 



GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES 

Robert B. Pyle, Chairperson 

Office: Price 203 

Objectives for Technology Education Programs: 

1. To develop advanced competencies in organizing and utilizing technical educa- 
tion strategies and methods. 

2. To further develop understandings and applications of objectives, principles, 
concepts, practices, and philosophies of Vocational and Technical Education. 

3. To further develop competencies in organizing, directing, and evaluating 
Technical Education programs, courses, and teaching-learning activities. 

4. To develop proficiencies in utilizing technological-educational problem solving 
and research techniques in Industrial, Vocational and Technical Education 
programs. 

5. To further develop depth and/or breadth in technological competencies in the 
various field of Technology Education. 

Degrees Offered 

Technology Education — M.S. 
Vocational-Industrial Education — M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

A. Unconditional Admission for "G" Certificate in Technology Education 

1. Baccalaureate degree from accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. SATISFACTORY SCORES ON THE "GENERAL" SECTION OF THE 
GRE OR OTHER AUTHORIZED EXAMINATION. 

3. Class A certificate in Technology Education or Vocational-Industrial Edu- 
cation. 

4. Satisfactory completion of all Graduate School requirements for admission to 
candidacy for a degree. 

5. Failure to meet any of these criteria may necessitate rejection of the applica- 
tion or the requirement of additional undergraduate work. 

B. Provisional Admission for "G" Certificate 

Applicants who enter the Technology Education and desire a "G" certificate must 
hold or be qualified to possess the Class A Certificate in the appropriate Technology 
Education Option. Students are advised of graduate and undergraduate course 
requirements necessary to qualify for specific North Carolina "A" and "G" teaching 
or director certificates in Technology Education. 



93 



Departmental Requirements 

A. TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION MAJOR. Masters degree candidates must 
complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate level courses, which include a 
12 semester hour concentration of Technology Education courses leading to "G" 
certification in Technology Education teaching. Other course requirements must 
include 3 semester hours of each: Research Techniques, Curriculum, Student Eva- 
luation, Research Seminar or Thesis, Education or Psychology, Electives. The grade 
point average in the graduate program must be 3.0 or better. (See certification note 
below.) 

B. VOCATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION MAJOR. Masters degree can- 
didates must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate level courses, 
which include a 12 semester hour concentration of Technology Education courses 
leading to "G" certification for either Trade and Industrial teachers or Local Direc- 
tors of Vocational Education. Other course requirements must include 3 semester 
hours or each: Research Techniques, Curriculum, Student or Program Evaluation, 
Research Seminar or Thesis, Education or Psychology, Electives. The grade point 
average in the graduate program must be 3.0 or better. (See certification note below.) 

*Persons with technical preparation and interest in post secondary education or 
technical training programs in private industry, which do not require teacher 
certification by the State of North Carolina, may pursue a masters degree in 
Vocational-Industrial Education Option III, but will not be qualified to receive 
either "A" or "G" teaching certificates. 

NOTE: Candidates pursuing Masters degrees in either Technology Education or 
Vocational-Industrial Education may also qualify for North Carolina cer- 
tification in Industrial Cooperative Training or Middle Grades Occupa- 
tional Exploration. 

Career Opportunities: 

Excellent employment opportunities exist for persons holding advanced degrees 
in all areas of Technology Education. Public schools in North Carolina and elsewhere 
are in constant need of securing certified teachers, supervisors, and administrators 
for Technology programs. 

Many career opportunities also exist for Technology Education specialists in 
occupations which do not require state teacher certification. These persons are 
employed as teachers, training directors, supervisors, and managers in post secon- 
dary schools and colleges or in the private sector of industry. 



TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Required Core Courses 

ALL options (15 S.H.) 

CURRICULUM (3 S.H.) 

TECH 662 Industrial Course Construction 

TECH 672 Curriculum Development Using Micro-Computers in Industrial 

Education 
TECH 766 Curriculum Laboratory in Industrial Settings 

EDUCATION OR PSYCHOLOGY (3 S.H.) 

CUIN 625 Theory of American Public Education 

CUIN 701 Philosophy of Education 

CUIN 703 Educational Sociology 

HDSV 660 Introduction to Exceptional Children 

HDSV 661 Psychology of the Exceptional Child 

HDSV 726 Education Psychology 

HDSV 727 Child Growth & Development 

94 



EVALUATION (3 S.H.) 

TECH 762 Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs 
TECH 765 Evaluation of Training in Industrial Settings 

RESEARCH (3 S.H.) 

TECH 767 Research & Literature in Industrial Education 

RESEARCH SEMINAR OR THESIS (3 S.H.) 

TECH 768 Industrial Education Seminar 

TECH 769 Thesis Research in Industrial Education 

ELECTIVE (3 S.H. Required) 

MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS (12 Semester Hours Required from Selected 
Specialty Options) 

Student selects 12 S.H. from this list or any other appropriate Graduate courses in 
consultation with a graduate advisor. 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

TECH 610 Internship in Industry I 

TECH 611 Internship in Industry II 

TECH 616 Plastic Technology 

TECH 617 General Crafts 

TECH 618 Vocational Education for Special Needs Students 

TECH 619 Curriculum Laboratory in Construction Technology Education 

TECH 620 Curriculum Laboratory in Manufacturing Technology Education 

TECH 630 Photography and Educational Media 

TECH 631 Advanced Computer Aided Design 

TECH 635 Advanced Principles of Graphic Communications Technology 

TECH 664 Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades 

TECH 665 Middle Grades Industrial Laboratory 

TECH 666 Curriculum Medium for Vocational Education Special Needs 

TECH 669 Safety in the Instructional Environment of Technology Education 

TECH 682 Microcomputer Systems for Industrial Education 

TECH 715 Advanced Comprehensive Shop Practice 

TECH 717 Industrial Education Problems I 

TECH 718 Industrial Education Problems II 

TECH 719 Advanced Furniture Design and Construction 

TECH 731 Advanced Computer Aided Design 

HDSV 717 Education and Occupation Information 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Option I: Trade and Industrial Education 

TECH 610 Internship in Industry I 

TECH 611 Internship in Industry II 

TECH 630 Photography and Educational Media 

TECH 631 Advanced Computer Aided Design 

TECH 635 Advanced Principles of Graphic Communications Technology 

TECH 660 Industrial Cooperative Programs 

TECH 661 Organization of Related Study Materials 

TECH 663 History and Philosophy of Vocational Education 

TECH 664 Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades 

TECH 665 Middle Grades Exploration in Industrial Occupation 

TECH 669 Safety in the Instructional Environment of Technology Education 



95 



TECH 670 Introduction to Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 671 Methods and Techniques of Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 682 Microcomputer Systems for Industrial Education 

TECH 717 Industrial Education Problems I 

TECH 718 Industrial Education Problems II 

HDSV 717 Education and Occupation Information 

Option II: Vocational Education Director 

TECH 610 Internship in Industry I 

TECH 611 Internship in Industry II 

TECH 669 Safety in the Instruction Environment of Technology Education 

TECH 663 History and Philosophy of Vocational Education 

TECH 717 Industrial Education Problems I 

TECH 718 Industrial Education Problems II 

TECH 764 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Education 

CUIN 612 Systems Approach and Curriculum Integration 

EDLP 755 Supervision of Instruction 

EDLP 758 Problems in High School Supervision 

EDLP 761 School Organization and Administration 

EDLP 765 School Community Relations 

EDLP 766 School Planning 

EDLP 767 Public School Finance 

EDLP 768 Principles of School Law 

Option III: Technical Education (Postsecondary/Private Industry) 

TECH 610 Internship in Industry I 

TECH 611 Internship in Industry II 

TECH 669 Safety in the Instruction Environment of Technology Education 

TECH 663 History and Philosophy of Vocational Education 

TECH 670 Introduction to Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 671 Methods and Techniques of Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 717 Industrial Education Problems I 

TECH 718 Industrial Education Problems II 

TECH 764 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Education 

TECH 766 Curriculum Laboratories in Industrial Settings 

EDLP 690 The Community College and Postsecondary Education 

EDLP 776 Principles of College Teaching 

EDLP 777 Seminar in Postsecondary Education 

EDLP 779 Technology Education in Community/Junior Colleges 

Note: TECH 668 — Independent Studies in Technology Education may be substi- 
tuted for selected courses with consent of advisor. 



Directory of Faculty 

Robert B. Pyle, B.A., M.A., Trenton State College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; 
Professor and Chairperson 

Earl Yarbrough, B.A., Wichita State University; M.A., California State University- 
Los Angeles; Ph.D., Iowa State University; Professor and Dean 

Ray Davis, B.S., University of Maryland Eastern Shore; M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State 
University; Professor and Assistant Dean 

Elazer Barnette, B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., North Carolina State 
University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 

David Dillon, B.S., Northwestern State University of Louisiana; M.A., University of 
Louisiana; M.A., University of Northern Colorado; Ed.D., North Carolina State 
University; Assistant Professor 

96 



Nancy L. Glenz, B.S., Trenton State College; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity; Assistant Professor 

Arjun Kapur, B.S., M.S., Ponjob University; Ph.D., Indian Institute of Technology; 
Assistant Professor 

Jane M. Smink, B.S., Winthrop College; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ed.D., 
North Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION and RECREATION 

Deborah J. Callaway, Chairperson 

Office: Corbett Gymnasium 

Objectives 

The objectives of graduate study in the Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation are: 

1. To provide knowledge of statistics, research and scientific foundations in Physi- 
cal Education 

2. To integrate Physical Education with general education through curriculum 
and educational psychology/philosophy courses 

3. To provide four areas for specialization: administration, teacher education, 
theoretical foundations of human movement and adapted physical education 

Degree Offered 

The Department offers a Master of Science Degree in Health and Physical 
Education. 

General Program Requirements 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program of Health and Physical 
Education is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

Departmental Requirements 

The non-thesis option requires 33 semester hours as well as the North Carolina 
class A teaching certificate. The concentration in adapted physical education 
requires an additional three semester hours (a total of 36 hours). The courses are as 
follows: 

1. Twelve semester hours in required Physical Education 784, 785, 786, 798 

2. Nine semester hours in a Physical Education area of interest 

a. Administration 

Physical Education 723, 741, 742 

b. Teacher Education 

Physical Education 721, 722, 723 

c. Theoretical Bases of Human Movement 

Physical Education 731, 732, 733 

d. Adapted Physical Education 

Physical Education 679, 760, 761, 762 

3. Six semester hours in Education 
CUIN 720, HDSV 726 or HDSV 701 

4. Six semester hours of general electives 

The thesis option is identical with the exception that PE 799 is taken as a required 
course and that one three semester hour general elective is required. 



97 



Career Opportunities 

The program prepares students for the G teaching certificate and provides for 
further academic advancement. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Health Education 

PHED-651 Personal School and Community Health Problems 

PHED-652 Methods and Materials in Health Education for 

Elementary School Teachers 
Physical Education 
PH E D-679 Evaluation of Motor Dysfunction 

For Graduates Only 

PHED-721 Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education 
PHED-722 Current Theories and Practices of Teaching 

Physical Education 
PHED-723 Supervision in Health and Physical Education 
PHED-731 Exercise Physiology 
PHED-732 Sport Psychology 
PHED-733 Motor Learning and Control 
PHED-741 Administration in Recreation and Intramurals 
PHED-742 Administration of Interscholastic and Intercollegiate 

Athletics 
PHED-760 Program Development in Adapted Physical Education 
PHED-761 Methods and Curricula as Applied to Adapted Physical 

Education 
PHED-762 Teaching of Adapted Physical Education 
PHED-784 Research Statistics for Physical Education 
PHED-785 Research Methods in Physical Education 
PHED-786 Scientific Foundations of Physical Education 
PHED-798 Seminar 
PHED-799 Thesis 



Credits 
3 

3 

3 



Directory of Faculty and Courses 

Deborah J. Callaway, B.S., Virginia State College; M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth 
University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Associate 
Professor 

James R. Coates, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland; Assistant Professor 

Leonard T. Dudka, B.S., M.A., California State Polytechnic College; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana; Associate Professor 

Eleanor W. Gwynn, B.S., Tennessee State A. and I. University; M.F.A., University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor 

Gloria M. Palma, B.S., University of the Philippines; M.S., Ph.D., Washington State 
University; Assistant Professor 

Tova Rubin, B.F.A., University of the Arts; M.A., Adelphi; Ph.D., Temple Univer- 
sity; Assistant Professor 



Courses 

PHED-651 
PHED-652 

PHED-679 
PHED-721 
PHED-722 
PHED-723 



Personal School and Community Health Problems 

Methods and Materials in Health Education for Elementary School 

Teachers 

Evaluation of Motor Dysfunction 

Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education 

Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Physical Education 

Supervision in Health and Physical Education 



98 



PHED-731 Exercise Physiology 

PHED-732 Sport Psychology 

PHED-733 Motor Learning and Control 

PHED-741 Administration in Recreation and Intramurals 

PHED-742 Administration of Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletics 

PHED-760 Program Development in Adapted Physical Education 

PHED-761 Methods and Curricula as Applied in Adapted Physical Education 

PHED-762 The Teaching of Adapted Physical Education 

PHED-784 Research Statistics in Physical Education 

PHED-785 Research Methods in Physical Education 

PHED-786 Scientific Foundations of Physical Education 

PHED-798 Seminar 

PHED-799 Thesis 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Peter V. Meyers, Chairperson 

Office: 324 Gibbs Hall 

The Department of History offers students a knowledge of the past which enables 
them to better understand today's world and to prepare for the future. The Depart- 
ment also helps students develop skills in research, analysis, decision-making, and 
communication. These skills prepare students for successful careers, constructive 
participation in civic affairs, and life-long learning. In short, the Department of 
History emphasizes the personal development of each student. 

The objectives of the Graduate programs of the History Department are: 1) to give 
historical content and professional skills- to students preparing for careers in fields 
such as education, law, religion, international affairs, social service, journalism, 
history, or government; 2) to offer a course of study leading to the Master of Science 
Degree in Education with a concentration in either History or Social Science; and, 3) 
to provide instruction for students preparing for doctoral programs. 

Degrees Offered 

History, Secondary Education — M.S. 
Social Science, Secondary Education — M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
program in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree 
of Master of Science in Education with a concentration in History or Social Science 
must hold or be qualified to hold a Class A teaching certificate in History or Social 
Science. If a person does not qualify for certification, appropriate undergraduate or 
graduate courses may be taken to correct this deficiency. All graduate students must 
complete a graduate course in methods of teaching the social sciences. 

Career Opportunities 

The skills and knowledge learned in history and social science courses can lead to 
careers in journalism, business, archives and museums, international affairs, and 
government service, among others. The M.S. Degree Programs in History and Social 
Science prepare students for classroom teaching in secondary schools. Businesses 
also find that teacher education graduates make good human relations specialists, 
personnel directors, technical writers, sales managers, directors of training pro- 
grams, and administrators. 



99 



Departmental Requirements 

To complete the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Education 
with a concentration in History or Social Science, the student may elect the thesis 
option or the non-thesis option. A comprehensive examination is required in History 
or the Social Sciences as well as in Education. Students must maintain a grade point 
average of 3.00. At present, it is the History Department's policy to require only the 
general tests of the GRE as an exit requirement. 

Curriculum Guide to the Master of Science in Secondary Education 
with a concentration in History 

History, Non-Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 24 semester hours in History courses. (Political Science 645 and 730 are 
accepted for History credit). 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725 and Education 701 or 
703 or 625 or 720 or Educational Psychology 726). 

History, Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 18 semester hours in History courses. (Political Science 645 and 730 are accepted 
for History credit.) 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725 and Education 701 or 703 
or 625 or 720 or Educational Psychology 726). 

3. 6 semester hours thesis. 

Program Objectives of the Master of Science in Secondary Education 
with a concentration in History 

Students in the Graduate History Education Program are provided the opportun- 
ity to: 
—Acquire an in-depth knowledge of specific areas, major historiograph ical 

schools of thought, and important periods of history; 
—Understand the impact of various groups, institutions, and nations on global 

history; 
—Become more skillful in the methods of historical research and writing; 
—Become more aware of the contributions of historical studies to policy analysis 

and decision making; 
—Become more sensitive to the differing environments, customs, and values which 

condition the behavior of individuals, groups, and societies; 
—Become more knowledgeable of recent trends in the methods of teaching history; 
—Qualify for the class "G" certificate in North Carolina; and 
—Earn a post baccalaureate degree in preparation for a doctoral program. 

Curriculum Guide to the Master of Science in Secondary Education 
with a concentration in Social Science 

Social Science, Non-Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 24 semester hours in social science courses. 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725 and Education 701 or 703 
or 625 or 720 or Educational Psychology 726). 



100 



Social Science, Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 18 semester hours in social science courses. 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725 and Education 701 or 703 
or 625 or 720 and Educational Psychology 726). 

3. 6 semester hours thesis. 

Program Objectives of the Master of Science in Secondary Education 
with a Concentration in Social Science 

Students in the Graduate Social Science Education Program are provided the oppor- 
tunity to: 
—Become more knowledgeable of the scholarly literature of specific areas of 

concentration in the social sciences; 
—Become more skillful in the methods of social science research and writing; 
—Become more knowledgeable of the contributions of social science techniques 

and findings to societal well-being; 
—Become more sensitive to the differing environments, customs, and values which 

condition the behavior of individuals, groups and societies; 
— Become more knowledgeable of recent trends in the methods of teaching the 

social sciences; 
—Qualify for the class "G" certificate in North Carolina; and 
—Earn a post-baccalaureate degree in preparation for a doctoral program. 

Directory of Faculty and Courses 

Dorothy S. Mason, A.B., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Georgia; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Professor 

Peter V. Meyers, B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University; 
Professor 

James G. Nutsch, B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas; 
Professor 

Courses 

HIST-600 The British Colonies and the American Revolution 

HIST-603 Civil War and Reconstruction 

HIST-605 Seminar on the Soviet Union 

HIST-606 United States History, 1900-1932 

HIST-607 United States History, 1932-Present 

HIST-610 Seminar in the History of Twentieth Century Technology 

HIST-615 Seminar in the History of Black America 

HIST-616 Seminar in African History 

HIST-617 Readings in African History 

HIST-620 Seminar in Asian History 

HIST-625 Seminar in Historiography and Historical Method 

HIST-626 Revolutions in the Modern World 

HIST-630 Seminar in European History, 1815-1914 

HIST-631 Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, 1914 to the Present 

HIST-633 Independent Study in History 

*POLI-645 American Foreign Policy — 1945 to Present 

Geography 

HIST-640 Topics in Geography of the United States and Canada 
HIST-641 Topics in World Geography 



101 



History 

HIST-701 Recent United States Diplomatic History 

HIST-712 The Black American in the Twentieth Century 

HIST-730 Seminar in History 

HIST-740 History, Social Science, and Contemporary World Problems 

HIST-750 Thesis in History 

tPOLI-730 Constitutional Development Since 1865 

tCUIN-725 Problems and Trends in Teaching the Social Sciences 

*Political Science 645 is accepted for history credit. 
tPolitical Science 730 is accepted for history credit. 
^Education 725 is required for graduate students. 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICES 

Wyatt D. Kirk, Chairperson 

Office: 212 Hodgin Hall 

The objective of the Department of Human Development and Services is to pre- 
pare individuals for positions in counseling and human development in both educa- 
tional and non-educational settings and to strengthen and improve the practitioner's 
professional skills in the area of human services. The program includes courses in 
theories and procedures, theoretical and practical examination of human develop- 
ment and changes, technique oriented courses, and a heavy emphasis in supervised 
practice. Graduates of the program are prepared to work in a variety of counseling 
settings, middle and secondary schools, junior colleges, and private agencies. 

Degrees Offered 

Counselor Education — M.S. 

Human Resource (Agency Counseling) — M.S. 

Human Resource (Business and Industry) — M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

Students entering any one of the three major areas of counseling (Human Resources 
(Business and Industry), Counselor Education or Human Resources (Agency Counsel- 
ing)) must have successfully passed the GRE before being admitted to the program. 

Following acceptance by the School of Graduate Studies, the Department of 
Human Development and Services will accept students once they have completed 
twelve hours of course work, at which time they will be evaluated, also, based upon 
their undergraudate grade point average, and the Department Faculty recommen- 
dation process. 

Also, after acceptance by the Graduate School (not the department), each student 
indicating an interest in Human Development and Services will be assigned an 
advisor who will assist in constructing a degree program consistent with the stu- 
dent's vocational goal and educational interest. Program development must be com- 
pleted before evaluation for departmental acceptance at the end of the twelve hours. 

Department Requirements 

Counselor Education majors — the major in the Counselor Education Curriculum 
must complete 60* hours of graduate work. The prerequisites for admission to the 
program are: 1) Internship in Guidance and/or its equivalency, 2) a course in Tests 
and Measurements, and 3) Introduction to Guidance. A Minimum grade of "B" must 
be achieved in the curriculum. This program is designed for the individual who seeks 
a School Counselor's Certificate and the Master's degree. 



102 



HUMAN RESOURCES 

The major consists of two concentrations, Human Resources with an Agency Coun- 
seling emphasis and Human Resources with a Business and Industry emphasis. The 
Agency Counseling major must complete 60 hours of graduate work. The prerequi- 
sites for admission to the Human Resources/ Agency Counseling program are: 1) 
Social Statistics (SOCI 302), 2) Introduction to Guidance (HDSV 600), 3) Personnel 
Management (BUAD 522). 

A minimum grade of "B" must be achieved in the program. The Human Resources 
major consisting of a Business and Industry emphasis must complete 60 hours of 
graduate work. The prerequisites for admission to the program are: 1) Social Statis- 
tics (SOCI 302), 2) Industry Psychology (PSYC 445), 3) Personnel Management 
(BUAD 522). 

These programs are designed for the individual who is seeking a non-school 
counselor's Master's degree. Also, these programs are for students who are inter- 
ested in a non-certification program and/or interested in careers in labor and man- 
power agencies at the local, state, and federal levels as well as private, industry, and 
community agencies. 



SEQUENTIAL (SUGGESTED) CURRICULUM ORDER FOR 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICE MAJORS 

COUNSELOR OF EDUCATION 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 

FIRST YEAR 



1st Semester 

HDSV-600 Introduction to Guidance 

Technical Core 
HDSV-623 Personality Development 


Credit 

3 

3 

_3_ 


Total Credits 


9 


2nd Semester 

CUIN-436 Test and Measurements 

Technical Core 
HDSV-706 Organization Administration Guidance Services 
HDSV-707 Research Seminar 


Credit 

3 

3 

3 

_3_ 


Total Credits 


12 


SECOND YEAR 
3rd Semester 

Elective Core 
HDSV-717 Educational Occupation Information 
HDSV-718 Introduction to Counseling 
HDSV-720 Theories of Counseling 


Credit 

3 

3 

3 

_3_ 


Total Credits 


12 


4th Semester 

HDSV-716 Techniques of Individual Analysis 

Elective Core 
HDSV-720 Theories of Counseling 
HDSV-733 Cross-Cultural Perspective 
HDSV-734 Counseling Special Population 


Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
_3_ 


Total Credits 


15 



103 



5th Semester* 

HDSV-726 Educational Psychology 
HDSV-730 Counseling Practicum I 
HDSV-731 Group Practicum 
HDSV-732 Counseling Practicum II 



Total Credits 



Credit 

3 

3 

3 

_3_ 

12 



•Comprehensive Examination in the 5th Semester 



SEQUENTIAL (SUGGESTED) CURRICULUM ORDER FOR 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICE MAJORS 

HUMAN RESOURCES CONCENTRATION (AGENCY COUNSELING) 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



FIRST YEAR 
1st Semester 

SOCI-302 Social Statistics 
HDSV-600 Introduction to Guidance 

Technical Core 
BUAD-522 Personnel Management 



2nd Semester 

HDSV-623 Personality Development 
HDSV-707 Research Seminar 
HDSV-716 Techniques of Individual Analysis 
Technical Core 



3rd Semester 

HDSV-717 Educational Occupation Information 
HDSV-718 Introduction to Counseling 
HDSV-720 Theories of Counseling 
Elective Core 



4th Semester 

Technical Core 

Elective Core 
HDSV-733 Cross-Cultural Perspective 
HDSV-734 Counseling Special Population 



5th Semester* 

HDSV-730 Counseling Practicum I 
HDSV-731 Group Practicum 
HDSV-732 Counseling Practicum II 
Elective Core 





Credit 

3 




3 




3 




_3_ 


Total Credits 


12 




Credit 




3 




3 




3 




_3_ 


Total Credits 


12 




Credit 


n 


3 




3 




3 




_3_ 


Total Credits 


12 




Credit 




3 




3 




3 




_3_ 


Total Credits 


12 




Credit 




3 




3 




3 




_3_ 


Total Credits 


12 



•Comprehensive Examination in the 5th Semester 
104 



SEQUENTIAL (SUGGESTED) CURRICULUM ORDER FOR 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICE MAJORS 

HUMAN RESOURCES CONCENTRATION (BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY) 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 

FIRST YEAR 



1st Semester , 

SOCI-302 Social Statistics 
PSYC-445 Industrial Psychology 
HDSV-600 Introduction to Guidance 
ECON-602 Technical Core 




Credit 

3 

3 

3 

_3_ 


2nd Semester 

BUAD-522 Personnel Management 
ECON-603 Technical Core 
HDSV-623 Personality Development 

701 Labor and Industrial Relations 




Credit 

3 

3 

3 

_3_ 




Total Credits 


12 


3rd Semester 

HDSV-707 Research Seminar 
HDSV-717 Educational Occupation Information 
HDSV-718 Introduction to Counseling 
HDSV-720 Theories of Counseling 


Credit 

3 

3 

3 

_3^ 




Total Credits 


12 


4th Semester 

HDSV-730 Counseling Practicum I 
HDSV-731 Group Practicum 
HDSV-732 Counseling Practicum II 
Elective Core 




CO CO CO CO (D 




Total Credits 


12 


5th Semester* 

HDSV-733 Cross-Cultural Perspective 
HDSV-734 Counseling Special Population 

Elective Core 

Elective Core 




Credit 

3 

3 

3 

_3_ 




Total Credits 


12 



*Comprehensive Examination in the 5th semester 



Directory of Faculty and Courses 

Wyatt D. Kirk, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Western Michigan University; Associate Professor 
and Chairperson 

Aurelia C. Mazyck, B.S., Howard University; M.S., New York University; Ph.D., 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Associate Professor 

Patricia D. Bethea, B.A., North Carolina Central University; M.Ed., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Myrtle B. Sampson, B.S., M.L.S., North Carolina Central University; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro; Ph.D., Heed University; Associate Professor 

105 



Miriam L. Wagner, B.S., University of North Carolina Greensboro; M.Ed., North 
Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina Greensboro; 
Assistant Professor 

Course Listings 

Courses Credits 

HDSV435 Educational Psychology 3 

HDSV 600 Introduction to Guidance 3 

HDSV623 Personality Development 3 

HDSV 660 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 

HDSV 661 Psychology of the Exceptional Child 3 

HDSV 662 Mental Deficiency 3 

HDSV 663 Measurement and Evaluation in Special Education 3 

HDSV 664 Materials, Methods, and Problems in Teaching Mentally 

Retarded Children 3 

HDSV 665 Practicum in Special Education 3 

HDSV 706 Organization and Administration Guidance Services 3 

HDSV 707 Research Seminar 3 

HDSV 715 Measurement for Guidance 3 

HDSV 716 Techniques of Individual Analysis 3 

HDSV 717 Educational/Occupational Information 3 

HDSV 718 Introduction to Counseling 3 

HDSV 719 Case Studies in Counseling 3 

HDSV 720 Theories of Counseling 3 

HDSV 721 Independent Studies 3 

HDSV 722 Career Education and Vocational Development Theories 3 

HDSV 723 Student Personnel Services in Post-Secondary Education 3 

HDSV 724 Advanced Counseling Theories, Strategies and Techniques 3 

HDSV 725 Human Resources Internship 3 

HDSV 726 Educational Psychology 3 

HDSV 727 Child Growth and Development 3 

HDSV 728 Measurement and Evaluation 3 

HDSV 729 Mental Hygiene for Teachers 3 

HDSV 730 Counseling Practicum I 3 

HDSV 731 Group Practicum 3 

HDSV 732 Counseling II 3 

HDSV 733 Cross Cultural Perspectives in Counseling 3 

HDSV 734 Counseling Special Populations 3 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN ENVIRONMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES 

Rosa Purcell, Interim Chairperson 

Office: Benbow Hall - Room 102 

Objectives 

The objectives of the graduate program in Food and Nutrition are: 

1. To develop the basic knowledge and skills necessary to undertake research in 
the Food and Nutritional Sciences and other related areas. 

2. To develop the competencies to work as nutrition specialists in Agricultural 
Extension or with other community nutrition agencies, and food industries. 

3. To obtain the theoretical and experimental competencies necessary to pursue 
additional graduate studies or obtain professional degrees. 



Degree Offered 

Food and Nutrition 



M.S. 



106 



General Program Requirements 

For admission, students in the graduate program in Food and Nutrition must have 
an earned baccalaureate degree in Food and Nutrition from an accredited under- 
graduate institution and have an overall grade point average of 2.6. Non-food and 
nutrition majors are encouraged to apply if the required course deficiencies are 
cleared. A minimum of six (6) hours or more of Food and Nutrition courses is 
required to clear these deficiencies. TOEFL (foreign students) is required. The 
Graduate Record Examination is not required for admission into the program; 
however it must be completed prior to receiving a degree. 

Option A is an experimental research and thesis oriented plan, with emphasis on 
Food or Nutritional Sciences. Applicants who have majored in Food and Nutrition, 
Food Science, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, Animal and Plant Sciences, Physi- 
ology, or other related science disciplines will be admitted. 

The Option B plan is a non-thesis program, which has the flexibility for students to 
choose extra course work (minimum six (6) credit hours). 

Other Requirements 

All applicants are required to take a Qualifying Examination in Food and 
Nutrition to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses. The test must be taken prefer- 
ably prior to the registration for graduate courses or at the most by the end of the first 
semester of the graduate work. Admission to candidacy for the M.S. in Food and 
Nutrition requires the satisfactory completion of the Qualifying Examination in 
Food and Nutrition, and the Qualifying English Essay Examination required by 
the Graduate School. 

A final Comprehensive Examination in Food and Nutrition can be taken only if a 
student has completed all course work and maintained a 3.0 grade point average in 
the Graduate courses at the 600 level or above. At least fifty percent of the courses 
counted in the work towards the Master's degree must be those open only to graduate 
students. 

The student must have already completed the Departmental Qualifying Examina- 
tion, the English Essay Examination, the Comprehensive Examination, satisfactory 
presentation and defense of the thesis (thesis option) and submission to the graduate 
office or completion of practicum (non-thesis) in order to be approved for graduation. 

Career Opportunities 

A degree in this area prepares students to enter careers in research, quality 
control, college and junior college teaching, food industry, community nutrition, 
dietetics, extension service and public service. 

For further information contact the Chairperson, Human Environment & Family 
Sciences, North Carolina A. and T. State University, Greensboro, NC 27411. 

A. Suggested Curriculum Guide for Option A — Food and Nutrition (30) 

Requirements: 

1. Twelve (12) semester hours of Food and Nutrition courses. 

HEFS 730 - Nutrition and Disease 3 credits 

(prerequisite HEFS 630 - Advanced Nutrition) 
HEFS 735 - Experimental Foods 3 credits 

(prerequisite HEFS 236 - Introduction to Food Science) 
HEFS 736 - Research Methods Food and Nutrition 4 credits 

(prerequisite HEFS 635 - Introduction to 

Research Methods) 
HEFS 744 - Seminar in Food and Nutrition 2 credits 



107 



2. In addition to the above core courses three (3) hours of statistics numbered 600 
or above is required. 

3. Six (6) semester hours in Food and Nutrition and related areas is required. 
Food and Nutrition related courses: 

HEFS 679 Nutrition Education 

HEFS 733 Nutrition During the Life Cycle 

HEFS 638 Sensory Evaluation 

HEFS 641 Current Trends in Food Science 

HEFS 650 International Nutrition 

HEFS 632 Maternal and Developmental Nutrition 

HEFS 640 Geriatric Nutrition 

HEFS 648 Community Nutrition 

HEFS 715 Trace Elements and Nutrition 

4. Three (3) semester hours of advanced Biochemistry or equivalent. 

5. Three (3) semester hours of suggested electives. 
Suggested electives: 

BIOL 769 Cellular Physiology 
ANSC 657 Poultry Anatomy and Physiology 
ANSC 615 Selection of Meat and Meat Products 
COSC 690 Advanced Topics in Computer Science 

6. HEFS 739 Thesis Research 3 credits 



B. Suggested Curriculum Guide for Option B (Non-Thesis) 



(36) 



Requirements: 

1. Twelve (12) semester hours of Food and Nutrition courses. 

HEFS 730 - Nutrition and Disease 3 credits 

(prerequisite HEFS 630 - Advanced Nutrition) 
HEFS 735 - Experimental Foods 3 credits 

(prerequisite HEFS 236 - Introduction to Food Science) 
HEFS 736 - Research Methods Food and Nutrition 4 credits 

(prerequisite HEFS 635 - Introduction to Research Methods) 
HEFS 744 - Seminar in Food and Nutrition 2 credits 

2. In addition to the above core courses three (3) hours of Statistics numbered 600 
or above are required. 

3. Six (6) semester hours in Food and Nutrition and related areas are required. 
Food and Nutrition related courses: 

HEFS 679 Nutrition Education 

HEFS 638 Sensory Evaluation 

HEFS 641 Current Trends in Food Science 

HEFS 650 International Nutrition 

HEFS 632 Maternal and Developmental Nutrition 

HEFS 640 Geriatric Nutrition 

HEFS 648 Community Nutrition 

HEFS 733 Nutrition During the Life Cycle 

4. Three (3) semester hours of advanced Biochemistry or equivalent. 

5. Three (3) semester hours of suggested electives 
BIOL 769 Cellular Physiology 

ANSC 615 Selection of Meat and Meat Products 
COSC 690 Advanced Topics in Computer Science 
ANSC 657 Poultry Anatomy & Physiology 

6. Food and Nutrition courses 9 credits 
HEFS 742 Food Culture: Nutrition Anthropology 3 credits 
HEFS 745 Practicum in Food and Nutrition 3 credits 



108 



HEFS 715 


Trace Elements and Nutrition 


3 credits 


HEFS 643 


Food Preservation 


3 credits 


HEFS 637 


Special Problems in Food, Nutrition, or 






Food Science 


3 credits 


HEFS 631 


Food Chemistry 


3 credits 


HEFS 630 


Advanced Nutrition 


3 credits 



Directory of Faculty 

Ramona T. Clark, B.A.S.W., M.S.W., California State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma 
State University; Associate Professor 

Johnson A. Kamula, B.S., M.S., Tuskegee; Ph.D., Howard University; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor 

Thurman N. Guy, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin; Ed.D., University of North Dakota; Associate Professor 

Bobby L. Medford, B.A., M.A., Guilford College; Ph.D., The University of North 
Carolina; Associate Professor 

Rosa Siler Purcell, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Illinois; Adjunct Assistant Professor and Acting Chairperson 

Geraldine Ray, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., University of 
North Carolina Greensboro; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 
University 

Chung Woon Seo, B.S., M.S., Korea University; Ph.D., Florida State University; 
Professor 

Lovie Booker, B.S., University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff; M.S., Tuskegee Institute; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Adjunct Professor 

Wilda Wade, R.D., B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greensboro; Food and Nutrition Specialist 

Courses - Food and Nutrition and Related Areas 

HEFS-630 Advanced Nutrition 

HEFS-631 Food Chemistry 

HEFS-632 Maternal and Developmental Nutrition 

HEFS-635 Introduction to Research Methods in Food and Nutrition 

HEFS-636 Food Promotion 

HEFS-637 Special Problem in Food, Nutrition or Food Science 

HEFS-638 Sensory Evaluation 

HEFS-640 Geriatric Nutrition 

HEFS-641 Current Trends in Food Science 

HEFS-643 Food Preservation 

HEFS-648 Community Nutrition 

HEFS-650 International Nutrition 

HEFS-679 Nutrition Education 

HEFS-715 Trace Elements and Nutrition 

HEFS-730 Nutrition and Disease 

HEFS-733 Nutrition During Life Cycle 

HEFS-735 Experimental Foods 

HEFS-736 Research Methods in Food and Nutrition 

HEFS-739 Thesis Research 

HEFS-742 Food Culture: Nutrition Anthropology 

HEFS-744 Seminar in Food and Nutrition 

HEFS-745 Practicum in Food and Nutrition 



109 



Other Related Courses 

HEFS-606 Cooperative Extension 

HEFS-607 Cooperative Extension Field Experience 

HEFS-608 Teaching Adults and Youth in Out-of-School Settings 

HEFS-614 An Integrative Approach to Home Economics I 

ANSC-615 Selection of Meat and Meat Products 

ANSC-617 Physiology of Reproduction of Farm Animals 

BIOL-769 Cellular Physiology 

CHEM-651 Biochemistry, General 

COMP-690 Advanced Topics in Computer Science 

SOCI-671 Sociology Research Methods II 

EDLP-778 Student Personnel Services 

EDLP-779 Technical Education in Community Junior Colleges 

EDLP-781 Internship (Community College/Technical Institute) 

EDLP-785-A Independent Readings in Education I 

EDLP-786-A Independent Readings in Education II 

EDLP-787-A Independent Readings in Education III 

EDLP-790-A Seminar in Education Problems 

EDLP-791-A Thesis Research 



MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS 

Abhay Trivedi, Chairperson 

Price Hall 

Master of Science in Industrial Technology 

Program Description 

The Department of Manufacturing Systems at the School of Technology, North 
Carolina A&T State University features a Master of Science in Industrial Technol- 
ogy program of study designed to cause students to expand their understanding of 
challenges related to manufacturing/industrial management and learn effective 
methods for dealing with accelerated technological change. The curriculum in the 
department is scheduled to be accredited by the National Association of Industrial 
Technology (NAIT). 

Admission Requirements 

The Master of Science in Industrial Technology, within the School of Technology, 
requires the GRE General Test as part of the admission process. No minimum score 
is required at this time. 

Program Objective 

Master of Science in Industrial Technology (MSIT) The objectives of the 
MSIT graduate program are built upon the competencies achieved at the baccalau- 
reate level in the industrial technology curriculum and thus prepares students to 
secure applications oriented "technical-management" positions in today's manufac- 
turing industries. Specifically, the Master of Science degrees in Industrial Technol- 
ogy are designed to prepare professionals in the following areas: 

1) Planning, organization and management of world class industrial technology 

2) High technology applications and control (ie: Computer Aided Design and 
Manufacturing (CAD/CAM), Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM), 
Robotics, Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC), Machine Vision and 
photonics) 

3) Control processes to improve quality, reliability and productivity 

4) Human resource management and development for a high involvement and 
changing work place. 

110 



Targeted Audience and Career Opportunities 

The program is intended to be most valuable to those who are currently employed 
in management areas of industry and have professional growth aspirations. The 
program will also be of value to those who have recently completed undergraduate 
study and want additional preparation prior to embarking on a career in industry. 
Graduates of the program should be able to perform more creatively and compe- 
tently in leadership roles involving planning, problem solving, and decision making. 

Program Curricula 

Core Courses: 

Problem Solving in Manufacturing Technology (MFG 610) 3 hrs 

Concepts in World Class Manufacturing (MFG 700) 3 hrs 

Manufacturing Organization and Management (MFG 735) 3 hrs 

Leadership Development Seminar (MFG 740) 3 hrs 

12 hrs 

Management Electives: (Select 6 hours from the following) 

Industrial Productivity Measurement & Analysis (MFG 673) 3 hrs 

Project Management (CM 692) 3 hrs 

Managing Product Development (MFG 745) 3 hrs 

Production Management & Control (MFG 755) 3 hrs 

Managing a Total Quality System (MFG 770) 3 hrs 

Technical Electives: (Select 9 hours from the following) 

Industrial Safety (OSH 630) 3 hrs 

Advanced Computer Aided Design (TECH 631) 3 hrs 

Principles of Robotics (MFG 651) 3 hrs 

Advanced Automation and Control (MFG 674) 3 hrs 

Special Problems in Electronics (ELTE 690) 3 hrs 

Special Problems in Manufacturing Systems (MFG 690) 3 hrs 

Applied Computer Integrated Manufacturing (MFG 696) 3 hrs 

Independent Study in Manufacturing Technology (MFG 699) 3 hrs 

Manufacturing Materials (MFG 710) 3 hrs 
Tool Technology (MFG 715) 

Advanced Manufacturing Process/CNC (MFG 760) 3 hrs 

Reliability Testing & Analysis (MFG 780) 3 hrs 

Special Topics in Manufacturing Technology (MFG 799) 3 hrs 

Co-op: (an internship experience in a manufacturing environment) 
Manufacturing Co-op (MFG 750) 6 hrs 

Master's Project: (choose a problem, design and implement solution in an industrial 
setting) 
Master's Degree Project (MFG 790) 3 hrs 

TOTAL 36 hrs 



Directory of Faculty 

William K. James, A.A., North Iowa Area Community College; B.S., Iowa State 
University; M.A., University of Northern Iowa; D.I.T., University of Northern 
Iowa; Assistant Professor 

Cheng-Hsin Liu, B.S., Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan; M.S., University of 
Oklahoma; Ph.D., Auburn University; Assistant Professor 

John H. Morris, B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; B.S., North Carolina A&T State 

111 



University; M.A., North Carolina State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University; 
Associate Professor 

Russell Rankin, Trade Certificate, North Carolina A&T State University; B.S., 
North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., North Carolina State University; 
Assistant Professor 

Mansur Rastani, B.S., Aryamehr University, Tehran, Iran; M.S., Polytechnic Uni- 
versity, Tehran, Iran; Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Associate 
Professor 

Abhay V. Trivedi, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Dakota State University; Chairperson 

Marcus Tillery, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Iowa State Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Iowa State University; Assistant Professor 

Earnest L. Walker, B.S., A.M. & N. College; M.S., University of Arkansas, Fayette- 
ville; Ph.D., Southern University at Carbondale, IL; Associate Professor 



MATHEMATICS 

Wilbur L. Smith, Interim Chairman 

Office: Marteena Hall 102 

The School of Graduate Studies through the Department of Mathematics offers 
two curricula leading to the Master of Science in Education. One is intended primar- 
ily for individuals who teach mathematics at the middle school or high school level 
and the other is intended for individuals who teach mathematics at the high school or 
two-year college level. In addition, it offers a program of studies leading to the M.S. 
degree in Applied Mathematics. 

Degrees Offered 

Mathematics, Secondary Education — M.S. 
Applied Mathematics — M.S. 

General Degree Requirements 

Mathematics Education and Applied Mathematics students must follow the 
general admission requirements for graduate studies; Mathematics Education stu- 
dents must also meet professional education requirements for a Class A Teaching 
Certificate. 

Departmental Requirements 

In addition to meeting general requirements specified above, a student seeking 
admission to a graduate program in the Department of Mathematics must have 
earned thirty (30) semester hours in mathematics including differential and integral 
calculus, linear algebra and differential equations. A student who fails to meet these 
requirements will be expected to enroll in appropriate undergraduate courses before 
beginning his graduate studies in mathematics. 

A student may not receive graduate credit for a course which is equivalent to one 
for which he received a grade of "C" or above as an undergraduate. 

Middle School-High School Curriculum 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. At least one mathematics course numbered higher than 690. 

2. Fifteen additional hours from the following: Mathematics 601, 602, 603, 604, 
607, 608, 610, 611, 612, 620, 623, 624, 625, 626, 631, 632, 633, 650, 651, 652, 691, 
700, 701, 710, 711, 712, 715, 717, 720, 751, 752, 765. 

3. An elective of 3 semester hours in education or mathematics or in an area 
related to mathematics. 

112 



Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. At least one mathematics course numbered higher than 690. 

2. Fifteen additional semester hours in mathematics from the following: Mathe- 
matics 601, 602, 603, 604, 607, 608, 610, 611, 612, 620, 623, 624, 625, 626, 631, 
632, 633, 650, 651, 652, 691, 700, 701, 710, 711, 712, 715, 717, 720, 751, 752, 765. 

3. A thesis focused on research in mathematics or in the teaching of mathematics. 



High School-2-Year College Curriculum 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. Nine semester hours in mathematics courses numbered higher than 690. 

2. Nine additional hours from the following: Mathematics 601, 602, 603, 604, 607, 
608, 610, 611, 612, 620, 623, 624, 625, 626, 631, 632, 633, 650, 651, 652, 691, 700, 
701, 710, 711, 712, 715, 717, 720, 751, 752, 765. 

3. An elective of three semester hours in education or mathematics or courses 
related to mathematics. 

Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. Nine semester hours in mathematics courses numbered higher than 690. 

2. Nine additional hours from the following: Mathematics 601, 602, 603, 604, 607, 
608, 610, 611, 612, 620, 623, 624, 625, 626, 631, 632, 633, 650, 651, 652, 691, 700, 
701, 710, 711, 712, 715, 717, 720, 751, 752, 765. 

3. A thesis or an investigative study in mathematics or in the teaching of 
mathematics. 

Applied Mathematics Curriculum 

A student seeking the Master of Science in Applied Mathematics must complete 
the following: 

1. At least fifteen semester hours of 700-level courses in either mathematics or an 
applications area of mathematics. 

2. A minimum of eighteen semester hours of credit in the Department of Mathe- 
matics and Computer Science. 

3. A thesis or a project. 

4. A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate credit. 

Directory of Faculty and Courses 

Bolindra N. Borah, B.S., Cotton College, India; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State Univer- 
sity; Professor 

Joseph R. Gruendler, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Associate Professor 

Wilbur L. Smith, B.S., A. & T. College; M.A., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity; Professor 

Richard R. Tucker, B.S., University of Washington; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State 
University; Professor 

Courses 

MATH-600 Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary School 
Teachers 



113 



MATH-601 Algebraic Equations for Secondary School Teachers 

MATH-602 Modern Algebra for Secondary School Teachers 

MATH-603 Introduction to Real Analysis 

MATH-604 Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers 

MATH-606 Mathematics for Chemists 

MATH-607 Theory of Numbers 

MATH-608 Methods of Applied Statistics 

MATH-610 Complex Variables I 

MATH-611 Complex Variables II 

MATH-612 Advanced Linear Algebra 

MATH-620 Elements of Set Theory and Topology 

MATH-623 Probability Theory and Applications 

MATH-624 Theory and Methods of Statistics 

MATH-625 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I 

MATH-626 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II 

MATH-631 Linear and Non-Linear Programming 

MATH-632 Games and Queueing Theory 

MATH-633 Stochastic Processes 

MATH-650 Ordinary Differential Equations 

MATH-651 Partial Differential Equations 

MATH-652 Methods in Applied Mathematics II 

MATH-691 Special Topics in Applied Mathematics 

MATH-700 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I 

MATH-701 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II 

MATH-710 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I 

M ATH-7 1 1 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II 

MATH-712 Numerical Linear Algebra 

MATH-715 Projective Geometry 

MATH-717 Special Topics in Algebra 

MATH-720 Special Topics in Analysis 

MATH-723 Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics 

MATH-725 Graduate Design Project 

MATH-730 Thesis Research in Mathematics 

MATH-731 Advanced Numerical Methods 

MATH-751 Solution Methods in Integral Equations 

MATH-752 Calculus of Variations and Control Theory 

MATH-765 Optimization Theory and Applications 



MUSIC 

Clifford E. Watkins, Chairperson 

Office: Frazier Hall 



Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

MUSI-609 Music in Early Childhood 
MUSI-610 Music in Elementary Schools Today 
MUSI-614 Choral Conducting of School Music Groups 
MUSI-616 Instrumental Conducting of School Music Groups 
MUSI-618 Psychology of Music 



114 



PHYSICS 

Caesar Jackson, Chairperson 

Office: 101 Marteena Hall 

For Graduate Students Only 

PHYS-705 General Physics for Science Teachers I (Formerly Physics 3885) 
PHYS-706 General Physics for Science Teachers II (Formerly Physics 3886) 
PHYS-707 Electricity for Science Teachers (Formerly Physics 3887) 
PHYS-708 Modern Physics for Science Teachers I (Formerly Physics 3888) 
PHYS-709 Modern Physics for Science Teachers II (Formerly Physics 3880) 



DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 

Godfrey A. Gayle, Chairman 

Office: 238 Carver Hall 

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design offers a pro- 
gram leading to the Master of Science degree in Plant and Soil Science. Students 
may select any concentration in Applied Environmental Biology, Landuse and Man- 
agement, Soil and Sustainable Fertility, Applied Environmental Chemistry and Soil 
and Water Conservation. The objective of the program is to prepare students with the 
expertise needed to assume technical, teaching, research, and extension positions in 
universities, industries, and state/federal governments. 

Thesis Option: A minimum of 30 semester hours at the 600 or 700 levels. Success- 
fully pass a qualifying examination and complete thesis. Student receives 6 semester 
hours credit for thesis. 

Non-thesis Option: A minimum of 33 semester hours at 600 or 700 levels. Success- 
fully pass qualifying examination. 

Degree Offered 

Plant and Soil Science — M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program in the Department of 
Plant Science and Technology is concurrent with the general admission require- 
ments of the University. 

Departmental Requirements 

Candidate should have a Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate 
institution. A bachelor's degree in Agriculture is not required if the student has had 
adequate training in the basic sciences. The candidate should have a grade point 
average of 3.0 either in science and mathematics courses or an overall undergradu- 
ate GPA of 3.0. 

The candidate must have a graduate record examination (GRE) score of 950 for 
admission to the graduate program. However, the GRE can be taken during the first 
year of graduate studies. If this is not done, the student will be asked to leave the 
program. 

Additionally, the candidates should have the following required courses and cred- 
its or their equivalent: 

Chemistry 12-15 credit hours 

Biology 12 credit hours 

Mathematics and Calculus 12 credit hours 

Physics 8 credit hours 

Soil and Plant Sciences 6-7 credit hours 

115 



Students who have not completed the required or equivalent courses at the under- 
graduate level, but have satisfied all other requirements for admission, will be 
granted a provisional or conditional admission and allowed to make up the deficien- 
cies (requisites) in the first two semesters. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science degree in Plant and Soil Science is 
required to complete a common core of courses consisting of 8 hours of the following 
courses: A student must take courses with asterisk (*). 
Chem. 441 or 651 Physical Chemistry or 5 Semester Hours 

General Biochemistry 
*CROS 607 Research Design and Analysis 3 Semester Hours 

*SLCS 717 Methodology in Soil, Plant, 3 Semester Hours 

and Water Analysis 
NARS 720 Graduate Seminar 2 Semester Hours 

Students pursuing the M.S. in Plant and Soil Science are required to spend a 
minimum of two years to complete course work and a problem in applied research. In 
addition, a minimum of 16 semester hours are required by area of concentration. 

Courses offered in Plant and Soil Science— M.S. Program 

AGEN 600 Conservation, Drainage and Irrigation 3 (2-2) 

AGEN 602 Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering 3 (0-6) 

CROS 603 Plant Chemicals 3 (3-0) 

CROS 604 Crop Ecology 3 (3-0) 

CROS 605 Breeding of Crop Plants 3 (2-2) 

CROS 606 Special Problems in Crops 3 (3-0) 

CROS 607 Research Design and Analysis 3 (3-0) 

SLSC 609 Special Problems in Soils 3 (3-0) 

EASC 616 Environmental Planning and Natural Resource 3 (2-2) 

Management 

NARS 618 General Forestry and Ecology 3 (2-2) 

EASC 622 Environmental Sanitation and Waste Management 3 (2-2) 

EASC 624 Earth Science, Geomorphology 3 (2-2) 

EASC 625 Earth Resources 3 (2-2) 

SLSC 627 Strategies of Conservation 3 (2-2) 

EASC 644 Problem Solving in Earth Science 3 (2-2) 

EASC 666 Earth System Science 3 (2-2) 

EASC 699 Environmental Problems 3 (3-0) 

AGEN 701 Soil and Water Conservation Engineering II 3 (3-0) 

CROS 702 Grassland Ecology 3 (3-0) 

EASC 705 The Physical Universe 3 (3-0) 

EASC 706 Physical Geology 3 (3-0) 

EASC 708 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 (3-0) 

EASC 709 Seminar in Earth Science 2 (2-0) 

SLSC 710 Soils of North Carolina 3 (2-2) 

AGEN 714 Applied Hydrology 3 (2-2) 

SLSC 715 Soil Mineralogy 3 (3-0) 

SLSC 717 Methodology in Soil, Plant and Water Analysis 3 (0-6) 

EASC 718 Applied Environmental Microbiology 3 (2-2) 

NARS 720 Graduate Seminar in Plant Science 1 (1-0) 

SLSC 721 Soil Microbiology 3 (2-2) 

SLSC 727 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition 3 (3-0) 

SLSC 734 Advanced Soil Chemistry 4 (4-0) 

NARS 777 Special Problems in Plant Sciences Graduate Studies 3 (3-0) 

NARS 799 Graduate Thesis 6 (6-0) 



116 



Directory of Faculty 

G. A. Gayle, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., N.C. State 
University; Professor and Chairman 

M. Kamp-Glass, B.S., Texas Tech University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University; 
Professor 

Daniel Godfrey, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., North Carolina 
State University; Ph.D., Cornell University; Professor and Dean 

R. J. McCracken, B.A., Earlham College; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., Iowa 
State University; Adjunct Professor 

C. A. Panton, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Purdue University; 
Ph.D., University of Lund, Sweden; Associate Professor 

Richard Phillips, B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., North Carolina State Univer- 
sity; P.E. for North Carolina; Adjunct Associate Professor 

C. Raczkowski, B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University; Adjunct Professor 

G. B. Reddy, B.S., M.S., A.P.A.U. (India); Ph.D., University of Georgia; Professor 

M. R. Reddy, B.S., Osmania University; M.S., A.P.A.U. (India); Ph.D., University of 
Georgia; Professor 

Manuel R. Reyes, B.S., University of the Philippines at Los Banos; M. Phil., Cran- 
field Institute of Technology, England; Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Assis- 
tant Professor 

A. Shahbazi, B.S., University of Tabriz; M.S., University of California, Davis; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor 

G.A. Uzochukwu, B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., University of 
Nebraska; Professor 

R. Williamson, B.S., Howard University; M.S., Howard University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts; Associate Professor 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Amarjit Singh, Chairperson 

Office: 223 Gibbs Social Sciences Building 

Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

POLI-640 Federal Government 

POLI-641 State Government 

POLI-642 Modern Political Theory 

POLI-643 Urban Politics and Government 

POLI-644 International Law 

POLI-645 American Foreign Policy — 1945 to Present 

POLI-646 The Politics of Developing Nations 

POLI-653 Urban Problems 

POLI-604 Directed Study/Research 

For Graduate Students Only 

POLI-741 Comparative Government 

SPEECH AND DRAMA 

Samuel Hay, Interim Chairperson 

Office: 304 Crosby Hall 

Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

SPCH-610 Phonetics 

SPCH-620 Community and Creative Dramatics 



117 



SPCH-633 Speech for Teachers 

SPCH-636 Persuasive Communication 

SPCH-637 Television Production 

SPCH-638 Television in Education 

SPCH-650 Theatre Workshop 



SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK 

Sarah V. Kirk, Chairperson 

Office: 201 Gibbs Hall 

Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

SOCI-600 Seminar in Social Planning 

SOCI-601 Seminar in Urban Studies 

SOCI-603 Introduction to Folklore 

SOCI-625 Sociology/Social Service Internship 

SOCI-650 Independent Study in Anthropology 

SOCI-651 Anthropological Experience 

SOCI-669 Small Groups 

SOCI-670 Law and Society 

SOCI-671 Research Methods II 

SOCI-672 Selected Issues in Sociology 

SOCI-673 Population Studies 

SOCI-674 Evaluation of Social Programs 

SOCI-701 Seminar in Cultural Factors in Communication 



NOTE: The Board of Governors at its September 10, 1993 meeting approved the 
establishment of a joint Masters of Social Work degree at North Carolina 
A&T State University and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 
Expected beginning date is 1995. Additional information will be available 
after August 1, 1994. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The following section identifies courses by department number, course number, 
course title, and a brief course description. Shown also are semester hours of credit of 
each course, and the number of actual lecture and laboratory hours required each 
week. For example — Credit 3(3-1), the 3 indicates that three semester hours of 
credit is given for satisfactory completion of the course. The (3-1) indicates that the 
course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory work each week. 



Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

AGEC-632. International Agricultural Trade Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a review of economic and welfare theory applications relative 
to trade of agricultural commodities. Topical issues include the analysis of linkages 
among commodity programs, fiscal and trade policies for the U.S. and other coun- 



118 



tries in an interdependent world, development of an understanding of international 
institutions and their role in formulating aliments of strategic agricultural trade 
policy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

AGEC-634. Commodity Marketing Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to analyze economic problems arising out of the demand, 
supply and distribution of specific agricultural commodities; the price making 
mechanism, marketing methods, grades, values, price, cost, and governmental pol- 
icy. Not more than two commodities will be studied in any one semester. Selection of 
commodities and emphasis on problem areas will be made on the basis of current 
need; commodities studied will include cotton, tobacco, fruits and vegetables and 
grains. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

AGEC-640. Agribusiness Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on methods of research, plans, organization, and the applica- 
tion of management principles. Part of the student's time will be spent in consulta- 
tion with agribusiness firms. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

AGEC-641. Special Problems in Agribusiness Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course relies heavily on case studies and simulation models to help make 
decisions and solve problems faced by agribusiness managers. Also, students will be 
exposed to quantitative techniques for analyzing and solving problems confronting 
the firm. Emphasis is placed on applying theoretical concepts to the real-world 
decision-making environment. Prerequisites: Ag. Econ 640, or consent of instructor. 

AGEC-648. Appraisal and Finance of Agribusiness Firms Credit 3(3-0) 

This course evaluates principles of land valuation, appraisal and taxation. Special 
areas include the role of credit in a money economy, classification of credit, princi- 
ples underlying the economic use of credit and the role of the government in the field 
of credit. 

AGEC-650. Human Resource Development Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the analysis of human resources in relation to changing 
agricultural production technology in rural areas. Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. 

AGEC-675. Computer Applications in Agricultural Credit 3(3-0) 

Economics 

This course is designed to provide students with the tools to utilize computers for 
agricultural decision-making. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing existing soft- 
ware packages for microcomputers and main-frame computers to make financial, 
economic and quantitative analysis of farm and agribusiness-related problems. 
Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 330 or Econ. 300. 



Graduate 

AGEC-705. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

Advanced topics on analysis of variance, regression, correlation, multistage sam- 
pling and probability are covered in depth. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 646. 

AGEC-708. Econometrics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the application of econometric techniques to agricultural 
economic problems, theory and estimation of structural economic parameters. Pre- 
requisite: Ag. Econ. 705. 



119 



AGEC-710. Microeconomics Credit 3(3-0) 

Price theory and the theory of the firm are covered comprehensively. The decision- 
making units in our economy and their market relationship are also examined. 

AGEC-720. Macroeconomics Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of aggregate economics, with emphasis upon measurement, 
growth and fluctuation of national income is the focus of this course. 

AGEC-725. Research Methods in Agricultural Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

The philosophical bases for research methods used in agricultural economics are 
discussed. Alternative research methods are compared with respect to their depend- 
ence on the concepts of economic theory, mathematics and statistics. Alternative 
approaches to planning research projects are evaluated. 

AGEC-730. Rural Development Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the application of economic theory, alternative growth 
models, requirements for growth, and quantitative techniques to problems concern- 
ing rural economic development and growth with emphasis on agriculture. 

AGEC-732. Agricultural Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

Advanced analysis of the role of agriculture in the general economy and of eco- 
nomic, political and social forces which affect development of agricultural policy is 
the substantive focus of this course. 

AGEC-734. Agricultural Marketing and Interregional Trade Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to apply basic economic theory to interpret the essential 
components of the domestic and international marketing process for agricultural 
products. The primary focus will be on the spatial, temporal and form dimensional of 
market price analysis with significant emphasis on regional interrelationship and 
specialization, current trade issues and the rational for trade. Specifically, students 
enrolled in this course will receive intensive instruction in the complex organization 
and function of the world's food marketing system. 

AGEC-735. Economic Development Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to analyze factors and issues involved in the process of 
economic growth and development, with emphasis on developing countries. The 
theories, problems, objectives and strategies of development, including major policy 
issues, resources, and constraints of alternative strategies are discussed. The role of 
capital, technology, agriculture and international trade in the development process 
are examined. 

AGEC-736. Agricultural Marketing Problems and Issues Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to examine current complex problems in agricultural 
marketing and methods of developing solutions. 

AGEC-738. Theory of International Trade Credit 3(3-0) 

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize the student with the fundamental 
mechanisms and theory (pure and monetary) of international trade. Selected topics 
will include the law of comparative advantage, gains from trade, factor endowments 
and growth theories, commercial policy, foreign exchange and the balance of pay- 
ments, and the monetary and portfolio balance mechanisms. Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. 

AGEC-740. Production Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses specifically on production economics theory in a quantitative 
framework. Technical and economic factor-product, factor-factor, and product- 
product relationships in single and multi-product firms under conditions of perfect 
and imperfect competition in both factor and product markets are topical areas. 



120 



AGEC-750. Social Organization of Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to analyze the status and role of agriculture in rural 
societies from a sociological perspective. Emphasis will be placed on understanding 
the organizational structure of agriculture and the intended and unintended conse- 
quences of rapid technological change on agriculture. 

AGEC-756. Agricultural Price Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

The use of price information in the decision-making process is the essence of this 
course. The relation of supply and demand in determining agricultural prices and 
the relation of prices to grade, time, location, and stages of processing in the market- 
ing system are considered. The course also includes advanced methods of price 
analysis, the concept of parity and the role of price support programs in agricultural 
decisions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

AGEC-799. Thesis Credit 6(6-0) 



Department of Agricultural Education and Extension 

AGED-600. Youth Organization and Program Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles, theories and practices involved in organizing, conducting, supervising 
and managing youth organizations and programs. Emphasis will be on the analysis 
of youth organization and programs in vocational and extension education. 

AGED-601. Adult Education in Vocational and Extension 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the principles and problems of organizing and conducting programs for 
adults. Emphasis is given to the principles of conducting organized instruction in 
agricultural education, extension and related industries. 

AGED-603. Problems Teaching in Vocational and Extension 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Practices in setting up problems for teaching unit courses in vocational and 
extension education. 

AGED-604. Public Relations in Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and practices of organizing, developing, and implementing public 
relations for promoting local programs in vocational agriculture and agricultural 
extension. 

AGED-605. Guidance and Group Instruction in Vocational 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Guidance and group instruction applied to agricultural occupations and other prob- 
lems of students in vocational education. 

AGED-606. Cooperative Work-Study Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles, theories, organizations, and administration of cooperative work expe- 
rience programs. 

AGED-607. Environmental Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and practices of understanding the environment and the interrelated 
complexities of the environment. The course will include a study of agricultural 
occupations related to the environment and materials that need to be developed for 
use by high school teachers of agriculture and other professional workers. 



121 



AGED-608. Agricultural Extension Organization Credit 3(3-0) 

and Methods 

Principles, objectives, organization, program development, and methods in coop- 
erative extension. 

AGED-609. Community Analysis and Rural Life Credit 3(3-0) 

Educational processes, structure and function of rural society, and the role which 
diverse organizations, agencies, and institutions play in the education and adjust- 
ment of rural people to the demands of modern society. 

AGED-664. Occupational Exploration of Middle Grades Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed for persons who teach or plan to teach middle grades occupational 
exploration in the curriculum, sources and uses of occupational information, 
approaches to middle grades teaching, and philosophy and concepts of occupational 
education. This course will be taught in cooperation with the Department of Business 
Education and Administrative Services, Home Economics, and Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

AGED-665. Occupational Exploration in the Middle Grades- 
Agricultural Occupations Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis will be placed on curriculum, methods and techniques of teaching, and 
resources and facilities for teaching in the agricultural environmental occupations 
cluster including Agribusiness and Natural Resources, Environmental Control, 
Hospitality and Recreation, and Marine Science. 



Graduate 



AGED-700. Seminar in Agricultural Education Credit 1(1-0) 

A review of current problems and practices in the field of agricultural education 
and extension. 

AGED-702. Methods and Techniques of Public Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the means and methods of promoting and publicizing local community 
programs. 

AGED-703. Scientific Methods in Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods of procedures in investigation and experimentation in education, accom- 
panied by critical examination of studies made in agricultural education and related 
fields. A research problem is developed under the supervision of the staff. 

AGED-704. History and Philosophy of Vocational Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with the underlying philosophy and basic principles of vocational 
education including history and development. Emphasis is placed upon the factors 
contributing to the nature, purpose, scope, organization, and administration of 
vocational education. 

AGED-705. Recent Developments and Trends in Agricultural 

Education and Extension Credit 3(3-0) 

The course includes an intensive treatment of the various subject matter fields to 
keep teachers and professional workers in related areas up-to-date technically as 
well as professionally. It is designed to cover the developments and trends in agricul- 
tural education and extension. 



122 



AGED-706. Comparative Education in Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis will be placed on basic development concepts and principles. Various 
types of education and their implication to agriculture will be studied to develop an 
understanding of international developments in agriculture. Students may meet 
course reequirements by studying and working in a developing country. (Enroll- 
ment by permission of department.) 

AGED-707. Issues in Community Development and 

Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of major issues and problems confronting rural and/or urban education 
in the United States and other countries with implications for program planning and 
development. Special attention will be give to adult education and community devel- 
opment. Students may meet course requirements by studying and working in other 
countries. (Enrollment by permission of department.) 

AGED-750. Community Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the common problems of the community that relate to agriculture and 
related areas and of solutions for these problems. 

AGED-752. Administration and Supervision Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of administrative and supervisory problems; the practices and policies of 
local, state, and federal agencies dealing with administration and supervision of 
vocational and extension education. 

AGED-753. Program Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Consideration is given to the community as a unit for program planning in agricul- 
tural education and extension. Special emphasis on collecting and interpreting basic 
data, formulating objectives, developing and evaluating community programs. 

AGED-754. History of Agricultural Education and Extension Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical development, social and philosophical foundations, and current status 
in relation to the total vocational education program. Special attention is given to 
agricultural education and extension as it developed in the United States. 

AGED-760. Thesis Research in Agricultural Education and 

Extension Credit 3(3-0) 



Department of Animal Science 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

ANSC-604. Administrative and Regulatory Policies Governing 

Animal Use Credit 2(2-0) 

This course consists of discussions of the regulations that impact the use of animals 
for research, education and testing, which include federal, state and local regula- 
tions and policies. Discussions also include the regulations, facilities, and practices 
involving the use of hazardous agents (biological, chemical, and physical) which 
affect the safety of humans and animals. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



123 



ANSC-61 1. Principles of Animal Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamentals of modern animal nutrition including classification of nutrients, 
their general metabolism and role in productive functions. Prerequisite: Animal 
Science 212. 

ANSC-613. Livestock and Meat Evaluation Credit 2(1-2) 

Selection and evaluation of desirable animals in both market and breeding classes. 
Identification and evaluation of wholesale and retail cuts of meat. Prerequisite: 
Animal Science 312 and 313. 

ANSC-614. Animal Breeding Credit 3(3-0) 

Application of genetic and breeding principles of livestock production and 
improvement. Phenotypic and genotypic effects of selection methods and systems of 
mating. Prerequisite: Animal Science 111 and 214. 

ANSC-615. Selection of Meat and Meat Products Credit 3(2-2) 

Identification, grading and cutting of meats. 
ANSC-61 8. Seminar in Animal Science Credit 1(1-0) 

A review and discussion of selected topics and recent advances in the fields of 
animal and food science. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

ANSC-619. Special Problems in Livestock Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Special work in problems dealing with feeding, breeding and management in the 
production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

ANSC-629. Special Problems in Dairy Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Special work in problems dealing with dairy production. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing. 

ANSC-623. Molecular Animal Physiology Credit 3(3-0) 

Specific basic biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms and concepts are 
discussed within the major physiological systems. Current research findings relative 
to the effects of environmental factors upon these systems are incorporated. Prereq- 
uisites: Laboratory Animal Science 461 or permission of instructor. 

ANSC-624. Physiology of Reproduction in Vertebrate Species Credit 3(3-0) 

The course consists of the study of mechanisms of reproductive processes with 
special emphasis on their interaction with the disciplines of nutrition, immunology 
and biochemistry. Prerequisites: Laboratory Animal Science 461 or Animal Science 
623 or permission of instructor. 

ANSC-637. Environmental Toxicology Credit 3(2-3) 

The course consists of the study of the sources, distribution and toxicity of chemi- 
cals which are hazardous to the environment of man and animals. Prerequisites: 
Laboratory Animal Science 636 or permission of instructor. 

ANSC-641. Disease Management of Livestock and Poultry Credit 3(3-0) 

Prevention and control of diseases will be studied in livestock species and poultry, 
as well as the micro- and macroenvironments that result in disease. Prerequisites: 
Animal Science 413 or permission of instructor. 

ANSC-653. Laboratory Animal Management and Clinical 

Techniques Credit 4(2-6) 



124 



Principles, theories and current concepts of laboratory animal science will be 
discussed. Topics included will be government regulations, ethical considerations, 
animal facility management and animal health surveillance. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

ANSC-657. Poultry Anatomy and Physiology Credit 3(2-2) 

A course which deals with the structure and function of tissues, organs, and 
systems of the domestic fowl. Prerequisite: Poultry Science 351. 

ANSC-659. Special Problems in Poultry Credit 3(3-0) 

Assignment of work along special lines in which a student may be interested, given 
largely by project method for individuals in Poultry Science. Prerequisite: Three 
advanced courses in Poultry Science. 

ANSC-660. Special Techniques in Specimen Preparation, 

Immunological Techniques, Electron Microscopy, 
Radioisotopes, Radiology or Histo technology Credit 3(1-6) 

The student will obtain special expertise in either the preparation of animal 
models for classroom, museum and special display, the theoretical and practical 
aspects of immunological techniques, electron and light microscopy, radiology, 
tissue culture or histochemistry. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Graduate 
ANSC-701. Environmental Topics and Animal Health Credit 3(3-0) 

The influence of the environment upon the health status of animals will be dis- 
cussed within specific topics representing the disciplines of epidemiology, toxicol- 
ogy, pathobiology, reproductive physiology, nutrition and microbiology. 

ANSC-702. Seminar in Animal Health I Credit 1(1-0) 

Seminar includes staff and guest lectures on the philosophy of research and 
utilization of the scientific method, preparation for research and general research 
methodology. Presentations will be given by students on special topics in the field of 
animal health. 

ANSC-703. Seminar in Animal Health II Credit 1(1-0) 

Presentations will be given by students on thesis research. 
ANSC-708. Special Problems in Animal Health Credit 2 

Independent investigations are conducted according to the health and manage- 
ment of animals that are dependent upon environmentally-related factors. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of instructor. 

ANSC-712. Nutrition and Disease Credit 3(3-0) 

The course examines the effect of altering the levels and ratios of nutrients upon 
the health of an animal and resultant biochemical or biological processes. Considera- 
tion will be given to the effect of disease upon altered nutrient requirements. Prereq- 
uisite: Animal Science 611 or permission of instructor. 

ANSC-713. Advanced Livestock Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Review of research relating to various phases of livestock production; fitting the 
livestock enterprise into the whole farm system. Special attention to overall eco- 
nomic operation. 



125 



ANSC-771. Advanced Design of Experiments Credit 3(3-0) 

Research designs suitable for investigation of multifactor experiments will be 
presented. Designs used in the agricultural sciences will be evaluated and emphasis 
will be placed on general linear models. Prerequisite: Natural Resources and Envir- 
onmental Design 607 or permission of instructor. 

ANSC-782. Cellular Pathobiology Credit 3(3-0) 

Current concepts of the structure, function and pathobiology of the cell will be 
presented. Emphasis will be placed on methodologies used to study the cell and its 
processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 651 or permission of instructor. 

ANSC-799. Thesis Research in Animal Health Science Credit 6 

Advanced research is conducted in an area of interest to the student under the 
guidance of a graduate faculty advisor. 

Department of Art 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

ART-600. Public School Art Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3270) 

Study of materials, methods, and procedures in teaching art in public schools. 
Special emphasis is placed on selection and organization of materials, seasonal 
projects, lesson plan. (Fall Semester — Summer Session) 

ART-602. Seminar in Art History Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3273) 

Investigation in depth of the background influences which condition stylistic 
changes in art forms by analyzing and interpreting works of representative person- 
alities. (On request). 

ART-603. Studio Techniques Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3273) 

Demonstrations that illustrate and emphasize the technical potentials of varied 
media. These techniques are analyzed and discussed as a point of departure for 
individual expression. (On request). 

ART-604. Ceramic Workshop Credit 2(0-2) 

(Formerly Art 3274) 

Advanced studio problems and projects in ceramics with emphasis on independent 
creative work. The student is given opportunity for original research and is encour- 
aged to work toward the development of a personal style in the perfection of tech- 
nique. (On request). 

ART-605. Printmaking Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3275) 

Investigation of traditional and experimental methods in printmaking. Advanced 
studio problems in woodcut etching, lithography, and serigraphy. (On request). 

ART-606. Sculpture Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3276) 

Further study of sculpture with an expansion of techniques. Individual problems 
for advanced students. 



126 



ART-607. Project Seminar Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly Art 3277) 

Advanced specialized studies in creative painting, design, and sculpture. By 
means of discussion and suggestions, this seminar intends to solve various problems 
which might arise in each work. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

ART-608. Arts and Crafts Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3278) 

Creative experimentation with a variety of materials, tools, and processes: projects 
in wood, metal, jewelry making, wood and metal construction, fabric design, leather 
craft, puppet making, and paper sculpture. (Summer Session) 

Graduate 

ART-720. Methods of Criticism, Interpretation, and Research Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Art 3285) 

Investigation on the theories of art, methods of criticism and their application. (On 
request) 

ART-721. Research and Analysis Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Art 3286) 

Individual projects relating to contemporary art in Europe and America. Two 
hours lecture and two hours studio or conference per week. (On request) 

ART-722. Seminar in Art Education Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Art 3287 

Special problems in the teaching and supervision of art in the public schools; 
laboratory experiences in a variety of media; observations, readings, discussion and 
lectures. (On request) 

Department of Biology 

Graduate 

BIOL-700. Environmental Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

Problems, concepts and interpretations of relations between organisms and the 
environment; an analysis of environmental factors on growth, reproduction, distri- 
bution, and competition between organisms. 

BIOL-701. Biological Seminar Credit 1(1) 

The presentation and defense of original research, consideration of special tops in 
biology and current literature. 

BIOL-702. Biological Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

A continuation of Biology 701. 
BIOL-760. Projects in Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

Special projects in biology that relate to biological instruction or research in the 
student's area of concentration. 

BIOL-761. Seminar in Biology Credit 1(1-0) 

A seminar on selected topics and recent advances in the field of plant and animal 
biology. 



127 



BIOL-703. Experimental Methods in Biology Credit 3(1-4) 

Laboratory techniques for androgenesis, parabiosis, parthenogenesis, transplan- 
tations, grafting and other experimental techniques for recent biological research. 

BIOL-704. Seminar in Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

Lectures, reports and laboratory procedures will be presented by student partici- 
pants, staff and guest lectures on modern techniques and recent developments of 
selected biological problems. The nature and scope of the problem and the methods 
employed to study them will be varied to suit the needs and background of the 
student. 

BIOL-739. Radio-isotope Techniques and Radiotracer Credit 4(2-4) 

Methods 

The techniques employed in the handling and measurement of radio-isotopes and 
their use as tracer agents in biological investigations. 

Botany 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

BIOL-640. Plant Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1571) 

A presentation of fundamental botanical concepts to broaden the background of 
high school biology teachers. Bacteria, fungi, and other microscopic plants will be 
considered as well as certain higher forms of plants. The course will consist of 
lectures, laboratory projects, and field trips. 

BIOL-642. Special Problems in Botany Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1573) 

Open to advanced students in botany for investigation of specific problems. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 140 or 640. 

Graduate 

BIOL-740. Essentials of Plant Anatomy Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the growth, development and organization of roots, stems, leaves, and 
reproductive organs of higher plants. Lectures, discussions, field trips, and the 
laboratories are employed in the presentation of this course. 

BIOL-741. Applied Plant Ecology Credit 3(2-3) 

A study of the relations of plants to their environment with emphasis on climate 
and soil factors influencing their structure, behavior and distribution. Prerequisite: 
Biology 640, 740, or equivalent. 

BIOL-742. Physiology of Vascular Plants Credit 3(2-2) 

Selected topics on the physiology of higher plants. Relationships of light quality, 
intensity, and periodicity to plant growth and reproduction: photosynthesis, and 
photoperiodism. Chemical control of growth and reproduction, and the general 
aspect of plant metabolism. Lectures, conferences, laboratory work and field studies 
of higher plant ecology. 

BIOL-743. Development Plant Morphology Credit 3(2-2) 

Growth and differentiation from a cellular viewpoint, with emphasis on quantita- 
tive description and experimental study of development phenomena. 



128 



BIOL-744. Plant Nutrition Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the subcellular organization of plants, inorganic and organic metabo- 
lism and respiration. 

BIOL-862. Research in Botany Credit 3 

General Science 

BIOL-600. General Science for Elementary Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Gen. Sci. 1570) 

This course will consider some of the fundamental principles of the life and 
physical sciences in an integrated manner in the light of present society needs. 



Zoology 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

BIOL-660. Special Problems in Zoology Credit 3(2-2) 

Formerly Zool. 1574) 

Open to students qualified to do research in Zoology. 

BIOL-661. Mammalian Biology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Zool. 1575) 

Study of the evolutionary history, classification, adaptation and variation of repre- 
sentative mammals. Prequisite: Biology 160. 

BIOL-662. Biology of Sex Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Zool. 1576) 

Lectures on the origin and development of the germ cells and reproductive systems 
in selected animal forms. Prerequisites: Biology 140, 160, and 260. 

BIOL-663. Cytology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Zool. 1577) 

Study of the cell with lectures and periodic student reports on modern advances in 
cellular biology. Prerequisites: Biology 140, 160, and 260. 

BIOL-664. Histo-Chemical Technique Credit 3(1-4) 

(Fromerly Zool. 1579) 

Designed to develop skills in the preparation of cells, tissues and organs for 
microscopic observation and study. Prerequisites: Biology 160 and 260. 

BIOL-665. Nature Study Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Zool. 1579) 

A study of diversified organisms, their habits, life histories, defenses, sex relation- 
ships, periodic activities and economic values designed to acquaint the student with 
fundamental knowledge that should lead to fuller appreciation of nature. 

BIOL-666. Experimental Embryology Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Zool. 1580) 

A comprehensive lecture-seminar course covering the more recent literature on 
experimental embryology and development physiology. Experimental studies treat- 
ing with fish, amphibian, chick and rodent development are designed as laboratory 
projects. Prerequisite: Biology 561 or equivalent. 

BIOL-667. Animal Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zool. 1581) 



129 



A lecture-laboratory course stressing fundamental concepts and principles of 
biology with the aim of strengthening the background of high school teachers. 
Emphasis is placed on the principles of animal origin structure, function, develop- 
ment, and ecological relationships. 

BIOL-668. Animal Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the qualitative and quantitative difference between behavioral charac- 
teristics at different evolutionary levels, adaptiveness of differences in behavior and 
the development of behavior will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Biology 260, 466 and 
561. 

BIOL-669. Recent Advances in Cell Biology Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to meet the needs of advanced undergraduate and graduate 
students desirous of the more recent trends concerning functions of organized cellu- 
lar and sub-cellular systems. Current research as it relates to the molecular and fine 
structure basis of cell function, replication, and differentiation will be discussed. 
Prerequisites: Biology 466, 562, credit or concurrent registration in Chemistry 224. 

BIOL-762. Applied Invertebrate Zoology Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the lower groups of animals, especially insects, and their economic 
importance to the southeastern region. Lectures, field trips, and experimental work 
with local animals are stressed, as well as factors affecting growth, development and 
behavior. Prerequisite: Biology 667 or equivalent. 

BIOL-763. Fundamentals of Vertebrate Morphology Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the morphological evolution of the chordate animals from a comparative 
aspect, with lecture-demonstrations of dissected organ systems of the frog and cat. 
Reference to man is made to give this course a human approach. Prerequisite: 
Biology 667 or equivalent. 

BIOL-764. Basic Protozoology Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the biology of free-living and parasitic protozoa with special emphasis 
on structure, behavior, life histories, and classification. Special attention will be 
given to free-living forms from such local animals as fish, frogs, and wild rodents. 
Prerequisite: Biology 667. 

BIOL-765. Introductory Experimental Zoology Credit 3(2-2) 

Studies of fertilization, breeding habits, regeneration, growth and differentiation 
of certain invertebrates and vertebrates from the experimental approach. Emphasis 
will be placed on laboratory procedures on the frog and the chick. 

BIOL-766. Invertebrate Biology for Elementary and 

Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of representative invertebrate groups with emphasis on origin, structure, 
function, classification, and ecological relationships. 

BIOL-767. Genetics and Inheritance for the Secondary 

School Teacher Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of mendelian and molecular genetics with emphasis on organic evolution, 
linkage, mutation of genes and chromosomes, population mechanics and the relation 
between genes and environment in development. Laboratory experiments with dro- 
sophila and maise. 

BIOL-768. Functional Invertebrate Zoology Credit 3(1-4) 

Special topics in Invertebrate Zoology to be selected for detailed study with labora- 
tory observations made on certain forms. 

BIOL-769. Cellular Physiology Credit 4(2-4) 

The physio-chemical aspect of protoplasm including permeability of surface ten- 
sion, cellular metabolism, and other measurable properties of living cells. 



130 



BIOL-860. Parasitology Credit 3(2-2) 

The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism, taxonomy, physi- 
ology and immunology of animal parasites. 

BIOL-861. Advanced Genetics Credit 3(2-2) 

The effects of chemical agents in the environment upon inheritance. Reports from 
the literature chiefly upon chemical mutations. Laboratory experiments on the 
chemical induction of crossing over. 

BIOL-863. Research in Zoology. Credit 3 

Department of Chemistry 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

CHEM-610. Inorganic Synthesis Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1670) 

Discussion of theoretical principles of synthesis and development of manipulative 
skills in the synthesis of inorganic substances. Prerequisites: One year of organic 
chemistry; one semester of quantitative analysis. 

CHEM-611. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1671) 

A course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of inorganic chemistry. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 442. 

CHEM-621. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 501) 

An in depth examination of various organic mechanisms, reactions, structures, 
and kinetics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222. 

CHEM-624. Qualitative Organic Chemistry* Credit 5(3-6) 

(Formerly 1776) 

A course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: One 
year of Organic Chemistry. 

CHEM-631. Electroanalytical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1781) 

A study of the theory and practice of polarography, chronopotentionmetry, poten- 
tial sweep chronoampereometry and electrodeposition. The theory of diffusion and 
electrode kinetics will also be discussed along with the factors which influence rate 
processes, the double layer, adsorption and catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 431 or equivalent. 

CHEM-641. Radiochemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1782) 

A study of the fundamental concepts, processes, and applications of nuclear chem- 
istry, including natural and artificial radioactivity, sources, and chemistry of the 
radioelements. Open to advanced majors and others with sufficient background in 
chemistry and physics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 442 or Physics 406. 

CHEM-642. Radioisotope Techniques and Applications Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1783) 

The techniques of measuring and handling radioisotopes and their use in chemis- 
try, biology, and other fields. Open to major and non-majors. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 102 or 105 or 107. 



131 



CHEM-643. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1784) 

Non-relativistic wave mechanics and its application to simple systems of means of 
the operator formulation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 442 and Physics 222. Corequi- 
site: Matematics 300. 

CHEM-651. General Biochemistry Credit 5(3-6) 

(Formerly Chem. 1780 

A study of modern biochemistry. The Course emphasizes chemical kinetics and 
energetics associated with biological reactions and includes a study of carbohy- 
drates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, nucleic acids, hormones, photosynthesis, and respi- 
ration. Prerequisites: Chemistry 431 and 442. 

*Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for this course. 

Inorganic Chemistry 

Graduate 

CHEM-711. Structural Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the stereochemistry and electronic properties of inorganic substances. 
Emphasis will be placed upon applications of group theory and upon spectroscopic 
and physical methods. 

CHEM-716. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1686) 

A lecture course on advanced topics of Inorganic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 611 or permission of the instructor. 

Organic Chemistry 

Graduate 

CHEM-721. Elements of Organic Chemistry Credit 3(2-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1690) 

A systematic study of the classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and indi- 
vidual examples of each. Structure, nomenclature, synthesis, and characteristic 
reactions will be considered. Illustration of the familiarity of organic substances in 
everyday life will be included. In the laboratory, preparation and characterization 
reactions will be performed. 

CHEM-722. Advanced Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1691) 

Recent developments in the areas of structural theory, sterochemistry, molecular 
rearrangement and mechanism of reactions of selected classes of organic com- 
pounds. Prerequisite: One year of Organic Chemistry or Chemistry 721. 

CHEM-723. Organic Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1692) 

An advanced treatment of organic reactions designed to give the student a work- 
ing knowledge of the scope and limitations of the important synthetic methods of 
Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 772. 

CHEM-726. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1693) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Organic Chemistry. 



132 



CHEM-727. Organic Preparations Credit 1-2(0-2 to 4) 

(Formerly Chem. 1694) 

An advanced laboratory course. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and purifi- 
cation of more complex organic compounds. Prerequisite: One year of Organic 
Chemistry. 

Biochemistry 

Graduate 

CHEM-756. Selected Topics in Biochemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1695) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Biochemistry. 

Analytical Chemistry 

Graduate 

CHEM-731. Modern Analytical Chemistry Credit 3(2-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1787) 

The theoretical bases of Analytical Chemistry are presented in detail. In the 
laboratory, these principles together with a knowledge of chemical properties are 
used to identify substances and estimate quantities in unknown samples. 

CHEM-732. Advanced Analytical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1788) 

A lecture course in which the theoretical bases of Analytical Chemistry and their 
application in analysis will be reviewed with greater depth than is possible in the 
customary undergraduate courses. Equilibrium processes, including proton and 
electron transfer reactions and matter-energy interactions, will be considered. Pre- 
requisite: One year of Analytical Chemistry or Chemistry 731. 

CHEM-736. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1786) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Analytical Chemistry. 

Physical Chemistry 

Graduate 

CHEM-741. Principles of Physical Chemistry I Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1789) 

A review of the fundamental principles of Physical Chemistry, including the 
derivation of the more important equations and their application to the solution of 
problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 606 or 222. 

CHEM-742. Principles of Physical Chemistry II Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1790) 

A continuation of Chem. 741. May be taken concurrently with Chem. 741. 

CHEM-743. Chemical Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1791) 

An advanced course in which the laws of thermodynamics will be considered in 
their application to chemical processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 



133 



CHEM-744. Chemical Spectroscopy Credit 3(2-3) 

(Formerly Chem. 1792) 

An advanced course in which the principles and applications of spectroscopy will 
be considered. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 

CHEM-746. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1795) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Physical Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 442 or 742. 

CHEM-748. Colloid Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1794) 

A study of the types of colloidal systems and the fundamental principles governing 
their preparation and behavior. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 

CHEM-749. Chemical Kinetics Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1793) 

A study of the theory of rate processes; application to the study of reaction mecha- 
nisms. Prerequisites: Mathematics 222 and Chemistry 442 or 742. 

Research and Special Problems 

Graduate 

CHEM-701. Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1098) 

Presentation and discussion of library or laboratory research problems. 

CHEM-702. Chemical Research Credit 2-5(0.6 to 15) 

(Formerly Chem. 1085, 1806 and 1807) 

A course designed to permit qualified students to do original research in chemistry 
under the supervision of a senior staff member. May be taken for credit more than 
once. 

CHEM-715. Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly Chem. 1088 and 1089) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemi- 
cal research by solving minor problems in Inorganic Chemistry. May be taken for 
credit more than once. 

CHEM-725. Special Problems in Organic Chemistry Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly Chem. 1090 and 1091) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemi- 
cal research by solving minor problems in Organic Chemistry. May be taken for 
credit more than once. 

CHEM-735. Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly Chem. 1092 and 1093) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemi- 
cal research by solving minor problems in Analytical Chemistry. May be taken for 
credit more than once. 

CHEM-745. Special Problems in Physical Chemistry Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly Chem. 1094 and 1095) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemi- 
cal research by solving minor problems in Physical Chemistry. May be taken for 
credit more than once. 



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CHEM-755. Special Problems in Biochemistry Credit 1(0-2) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemi- 
cal research by solving minor problems in Biochemistry. May be taken for credit 
more than once. 

CHEM-663. Selected Topics in Chemistry Instruction I Credit 1(1-0) 

A study of the curriculum and educational materials developed for use in the 
Thirteen College Curriculum Program in Physical Science. 

CHEM-664. Selected Topics in Chemistry Instruction II Credit 1(1-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 763. 

CHEM-765. Special Problems in Chemistry Instruction I Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to introduce students to techniques of Chemistry instruction at 
the college level. 

CHEM-766. Special Problems in Chemistry Instruction II Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 765. 

CHEM-767. Special Problems in Chemistry 

Instruction III Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 766. 

Computer Science Department 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

COMP 600 Special Topics in Computer Science Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a seminar surveying fundamental concepts and current ideas in computer 
science. The course shall be administrated by a faculty team employing a cooperative 
teaching paradigm. Students shall select, research, and present topics of their 
interest. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 

COMP 645 Artificial Intelligence Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents the theory artificial intelligence, and application of the 
principles of artificial intelligence to problems that cannot be solved, or cannot be 
solved efficiently, by standard algorithmic techniques. Knowledge representation, 
and Knowledge-based systems. Topics include search strategies, production sys- 
tems, heuristic search, expert systems, inference rules, computational logic, natural 
language processing. Predicate calculus is discussed. An artificial intelligence lan- 
guage is presented as a vehicle for implementing concepts of artificial intelligence. 
Prerequisite: COMP 285 (Algorithms). 

COMP 653 Computer Graphics Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course in fundamental principles and methods in the design, use, and 
understanding of computer graphic systems. Topics include coordinate representa- 
tions, graphics functions, and software standards. Hardware and software compo- 
nents of computer graphics are discussed. The course presents graphics algorithms. 
It also introduces basic two-dimensional transformations, reflection, shear, window- 
ing concepts, clipping algorithms, window-to-viewpoint transformations, segment 
concept, files, attributes and multiple workstation, and interactive picture-construc- 
tion techniques. Prerequisites: COMP 285 (Algorithms) and Math 350 (Linear 
Algebra). 

COMP 663 Principles of Compiler Design Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly: COMP 647 - Compiler Construction) 

This course emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspect of constructing com- 
pilers for computer programming languages. The course covers principles, models, 
and techniques used in the design and implementation of compilers, interpreters, 



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and assemblers. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing arithmetic expressions and 
simple statements, syntax specification, algorithms for syntax analysis, object code 
generation, and code optimization. Each student will develop and implement a 
compiler. Prerequisites: COMP 375 (Computer Architecture), COMP 385 (Theory of 
Computing). 

Graduate 

COMP 710 Software Specification, Analysis & Design Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the formalization of software requirements and the analysis 
of the flow of data through a proposed large software system. Methodologies covered 
include Structured Analysis (data flow diagramming), hierarchy charts, entity- 
relationship data diagrams, procedure specifications, and Information Engineer- 
ing. Additional methodologies addressed include Jackson Structured Diagrams, 
Harlan Black Boxes, and Object Oriented Analysis techniques. Prerequisite: Grad- 
uate standing. 

COMP 711 Software System Design, Implementation, Verification 

& Validation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course proceeds from the evaluation of a completed system design for com- 
pleteness, correctness, information engineering, and functionality. Accepted indus- 
try and academic standards for such reviews will be used, for example leveling of 
data flow diagrams, measures of module cohesion, control structures, and function 
point estimation. As part of the implementation process, verification and validation 
methodologies will be studied and practiced. An actual system will be implemented 
by the end of the semester. Prerequisite: COMP 716. 

COMP 712 Software Project Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the nature of data processing projects, definitions of pur- 
pose, scope, objectives, deliverable dates, and quality standards. Interpersonal 
interaction and people oriented management techniques are studied, along with 
team member measurement and assessment methods. Project management tools 
such as PERT (Project Evaluation and Review Technique), and CPM (Critical Path 
Method) are covered. Managerial styles in motivating, innovating, and organizing 
will be examined, along with techniques for improving these skills. Equipment and 
software selection and installation guidelines, and the proper use of outside consult- 
ing services will be examined. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. 

COMP 713 Social Impacts of Software Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the increasing importance of computer technology in the 
functionality of our economy, our government, and our industry. Potential impacts 
upon personal privacy and autonomy are examined in relation to the public policy 
and social impacts of computer technology. The role and opportunity for historically 
under-represented technical professional will be explored. Interdisciplinary read- 
ings, written and oral presentations, and in class debates are required. Outside 
speakers from related disciplines are invited to participate. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing. 

COMP 714 CASE, Automated Development, & Information 

Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

Beginning with the concepts of automated development, various models are 
reviewed in detail, especially Information Engineering. Methodology assessment 
approaches are covered, especially the Software Engineering Institute Process 
Maturity model, and a variety of organizational impacts of technology are examined. 
Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) is covered through tutorial labora- 
tory sessions and a problem assignment. Topics include fundamentals of data analy- 
sis, diagramming tools for data modeling process analysis, presentation architec- 
ture, communications architecture, data architecture, process architecture, and 
application construction. Techniques and tools for defining menu structures, screens 
and screen dialogues, and user interface management systems are studied, as are the 
general principles of physical design. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 



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COMP 715 Decision Support Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines methods of inference under uncertainty and problem solving 
strategies as key components of decision support systems. Knowledge based systems, 
knowledge acquisition and representation, and the planning, design and implemen- 
tation of computer assisted decision systems are covered. The interactive use of 
software for management decision making is examined through examples drawn 
from decision modeling, simulations, and large-scale commercial applications. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

COMP 717 Software Fault Tolerance Credit 3(3-0) 

The principles, techniques and current practices in the area of fault tolerant 
computing with an emphasis on system structure and dependability are examined in 
this course. Major topics include system models, software/hardware interaction, 
failure and reliability, fault tolerance principles, redundancy, rollback and recovery 
strategies, and N-version programming. Redundancy in data structures and the 
validation of fault tolerant software are studied. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

COMP 718 Object Oriented Software Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the concept of the "object oriented life cycle," demonstrating a 
practical methodology for the application of object oriented methods to large pro- 
jects. The specific problems and solutions for large software systems are discussed, 
object oriented requirements analysis (OORA), object oriented requirements speci- 
fication (OORS), object oriented analysis (OOA), object oriented design (OOD), and 
and object oriented domain analysis (OODA) are covered. Existing and upcoming 
object oriented Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools are examined 
and object oriented database design issues are discussed with analysis of specific 
systems currently in practice or under development. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

COMP 719 Software Reuse Techniques Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the state-of-the-art in software reuse techniques and sys- 
tems, along with fundamental principles and models, and directions and problems 
for further research. The technological framework of software reuse is discussed 
along with reusability frameworks, assessment, and the operational problems of 
reusability. Major topics include a study of composition-based systems, classifica- 
tions of reusable models, interface issues, information hiding for reuse, and the 
principles of parameterized programming. An approach using structured algebraic 
specification, partially interpreted schemes, and the templates approach to software 
reuse is presented, along with generation based systems, language based systems, 
application generators, and transformation based systems. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

COMP 741 Knowledge Representation and Acquisition Credit 3(3-0) 

The representation formalisms used in artificial intelligence are explained, along 
with representation selection and implementation in common Artificial Intelligence 
languages and shells. Formalisms include first order logic and its extensions, seman- 
tic nets, frames and scripts, and KL-ONE-like languages. Knowledge acquisition is 
introduced as eliciting knowledge, interpreting elicited data within a conceptual 
framework, and the formalizing of conceptualizations prior to software implementa- 
tion. Knowledge acquisition techniques such as protocol analysis, repertory grids, 
and laddering are examined. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

COMP 742 Automated Reasoning Credit 3(3-0) 

This course studies the computational aspects of logic via propositional and predi- 
cate calculi, as well as the theory underlying their automation through logic pro- 
gramming languages. Various forms of resolution and their soundness and com- 
pleteness are examined along with unification and its properties. Proof procedures 
and their search characteristics, term rewriting, and techniques such as narrowing 
are researched as a means of theory resolution. The relationship of formal specifica- 
tion techniques such as cut elimination, efficiency, and implementation issues are 
addressed. Prerequisite: COSC 645. 

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COMP 745 Computational Linguistics Credit 3(3-0) 

A presentation of computational linguistics theory and practice. Advanced read- 
ings which emphasize theories of dialogue and research methodologies are exam- 
ined. Technical writing for journals and conferences is stressed as a goal of research 
output. Prerequisite: COSC 645. 

COMP 746 Advanced Artificial Intelligence Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a further study of artificial intelligence principles, with a focus on 
knowledge-based systems. The course examines planning, belief revision, control, 
and system evaluation and implementation. Advanced topics include automated 
theorem proving, learning and robotics, neural nets, and the adequacy of existing 
theoretical treatments. Prerequisite: COMP 645. 

COMP 747 Computer Vision Methodologies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course researches techniques for image understanding, both low-level and 
high-level image processing, mathematical morphology, neighborhood operators, 
labeling and segmentation. Vision methods covered include perspective transforma- 
tion, motion, the consistent-labeling problem, matching, object models, and knowl- 
edge-based vision. Prerequisite: COSC 645. 

COMP 749 Intelligent Robots Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines intelligent robot systems as inclusive of knowledge repre- 
sentations, path finders, inference systems of rules and logic, and image understand- 
ing and spatial reasoning systems. Problems of navigation, algorithm development, 
robot programming languages and multiple robot co-operation are explored. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

COMP 751 Distributed Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the operating system concepts necessary for the design and 
effective use of networked computer systems. Such concepts include communication 
models and standards, remote procedure calls, name resolution, distributed file 
systems, security, mutual exclusion and distributed databases. Students are re- 
quired to construct an advanced implementation of distributed operating system 
facilities or a simulation of same. Prerequisite: COSC 650. 

COMP 753 Performance Modeling and Evaluation Credits Credit 3(3-0) 

Common techniques and current results in the performance evaluation of compu- 
ter systems are studied in this course. Background material in probability theory, 
queuing theory, simulation, and discrete mathematics is reviewed so that a perfor- 
mance evaluation of resource management algorithms for operating systems and 
database management systems in parallel and distributed environments may be 
developed. Prerequisite: COMP 650. 

COMP 780 Theoretical Computer Science: Formal Models 

& Semantics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the formal treatment of the specification, meaning, and 
correctness of programs. Required mathematical results are examined, in areas 
such as universal algebra and category theory. Major course topics include the 
lambda calculus, type systems for programming languages, polymorphism, alge- 
braic specification, rewrite systems, and semantic domains. The denotational 
semantics of programming languages, program logics, and program verification are 
discussed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

COMP 790 Special Topics in Computer Science Variable Credit (1-3) 

This course permits research in advanced topics pertinent to the student's pro- 
gram of study. Prerequisite: Permission of Advisor. 

COMP 791 Current Topics in Computer Science Credit 0(1-0) 

This is a seminar course which surveys advanced concepts and current ideas in 
computer science. The course will be administered by a faculty team utilizing a 



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cooperative teaching paradigm. Students shall select research and present topics of 
their interest after approval by the instructors. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

COMP 797 MS Thesis Research Variable Credit (1-6) 

Master of Science thesis research under the supervision of the thesis committee 
chairperson, leading to the completion of the Master's Thesis. This course is only 
available to thesis option students. Prerequisite: Permission of Advisor. 

COMP 798 MSCS Project Variable Credit (1-3) 

Advanced research of interest to the student and the instructor. A written proposal 
which outlines the nature of the project and the deliverables must be submitted for 
approval. This course is only available to project option students. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Advisor. 



Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

CUIN-600. Organization of Media Collections Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education Media 600) 

Basic course in techniques of book and non-book description, their organization for 
services in libraries through decimal classification and their subject representation 
in the public catalog. Practice in laboratory. 

CUIN-601. Reference Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education Media 601) 

The selection, evaluation, and use of basic reference materials with emphasis on 
the selection of materials, study of cdntents, methods of location, and practical 
application. 

CUIN-602. Extramural Studies II Credit 1-3 

Off -campus experience s with educational programs of agencies, organizations, 
institutions or businesses which gives first hand experiences with youth and adults 
and aspects of education. Project reports and evaluation by permission of depart- 
ment. 

CUIN-603. Production of Instructional Materials Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Education Media 603) 

The planning, designing, and production of opaque materials, charts, graphs, 
posters, transparencies, mounting, bulletin boards, displays, models, mock-ups, 
spectrums, chalkboards, scriptwriting, and recording techniques. 

CUIN-604. Administration of Educational Media Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education Media 604) 

Planning, organizing, coordinating, and administering educational media pro- 
grams. Developing criteria for selection, utilization care, and evaluation of the 
effectiveness of materials and equipment. Scientific arrangements of learning 
environments, space and space relations. The planning of facilities and budgeting for 
program and public relations activities. 

CUIN-605. Concepts of Career Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Career Education and manpower concepts in a changing society with emphasis on 
career awareness, career exploration, and career preparation for kindergarten 
through the postsecondary level. Development of career education models and eva- 
luation schema. 

CUIN-606. Curricular Integration of Career Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Integration of Career Education within subject content areas. Special attention to 
mathematics, social science, science, humanities, and career-oriented programs. 

139 



CUIN-607. Administration of Career Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

The organization and implementation of Career Education Programs. Includes 
methods and models for inservice training for teachers and counselors. Evaluation of 
Career Education Programs. 

CUIN-608. Seminar in Career Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of literature, research, issues and problems in Career Education. 

CUIN-609. Production for Instructional Radio and Television Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Educational Media 609) 

Affords opportunities for the student to develop and utilize knowledge and skills in 
designing settings, lighting techniques, operation of controls, directing, camera 
operation and care, producing and caring for visuals, video tapes, audio tapes, 
duplicating of tapes, rear screen projections and sound effects, background music, 
also producing multi-media mix programs for various situations such as: slide-tape, 
or multi-image programs through film, slide, and opaque chain. Special provisions 
for training in preventive maintenance and minor repairs of equipment will be 
provided. 

CUIN-610. Broadcasting for Instructional Radio Credit 3(3-0) 

and Television 
(Formerly Educational Media 610) 

Presents and evaluates live broadcast programs for instruction within the frame- 
work of acceptable criteria supported by the profession. Presenting and evaluating 
the effectiveness of videotaped or video disc recorded programs as used for instruc- 
tional situations. To develop guidelines for quality radio and television programs. 

CUIN-611. Utilization of Educational Media Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Education Media 602) 

Applies basic concept to problems in teaching and learning with school and adult 
audiences. Relates philosophical and psychological bases of communications to 
teaching. Discusses the role of communications in problem-solving, attitude forma- 
tion, and teaching. Methods of selecting and using educational media materials 
effectively in teaching. Experience in operating equipment, basic techniques in 
media preparation. Practice in planning and presenting a session. 

CUIN-612. Instructional Design Basics Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Educational Media 605) 

Analysis of subject content, learners, specifications, and evaluation of objectives, 
analysis and sequencing of tasks, design of stimulus materials, selecting and evaluat- 
ing of materials. Planning instructional units. 

CUIN-613. Developmental Media for Children Credit 3(3-0) 

(Children's Literature) 
(Formerly Educational Media 606) 

A study of children's literature with emphasis on aids and criteria for selection of 
books and other materials for preschool through late childhood ages, story-telling, 
and an investigation of reading interests. 

CUIN-614. Book Selection and Related Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

for Young People 
(Formerly Educational Media 607) 

A consideration of literature, reading interests, and non-book materials for young 
people. 

CUIN-615. Programming for Instructional Radio 

and Television Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education Media 608) 

Provides the student with the historical background of radio and television, prin- 
ciples and skills in utilizing the theory, language, signs and symbols, of radio and 



140 



television. Emphasis will be focused on cooperative team teaching approach, experi- 
mentation, and innovation as strategies for programming instruction. 

CUIN-620. Foundations in Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 630) 

Basic reading course; consideration of the broad field of reading— its goal and 
nature; factors affecting its growth; sequential development of skills, attitudes and 
interests, types of reading approaches, organization and materials in teaching the 
fundamentals of reading. 

CUIN-621. Word Recognition/Identification Skills Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 631) 

This course explores phonic (letter-sound correspondence), syntatic (grammar), 
semantic (meaning), morphemic (structure) and visual word identification tech- 
niques for word recognition in developmental, corrective and remedial reading 
programs. Methods of teaching and materials for introducing and reinforcing the 
skills are included. 

CUIN-622. Teaching Reading Through the Primary Years Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 635) 

Methods, materials, and techniques used in reading instruction of pre-school 
through grade three. An examination of learning, the teaching of reading, and 
curriculum experiences and procedures for developing reading skills. 

CUIN-623. Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in the 

Elementary School Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 636) 

The application of principles of learning and child development to the teaching of 
reading and the related language arts. Methods and approaches to the teaching of 
reading in the elementary school, including phonics, developmental measures, 
informal testing procedures, and the construction and utilization of instructional 
materials. 

CUIN-624. Teaching Reading in the Secondary School Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 637) 

Nature of a developmental reading program, initiating and organizing a high 
school reading program, the reading curriculum, including reading in the content 
subjects, critical reading, procedures and techniques, and corrective and remedial 
aspects. 

CUIN-625. Theory of American Public Education Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the philosophical resources, objectives, historical influences, 
social organization, administration, support, and control of public education in the 
United States. 

CUIN-626. History of American Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the historical development of education in the United States, emphasiz- 
ing educational concepts and practices as they relate to political, social and cultural 
developments in the growth of a system of public education. 

CUIN-627. The Afro-American Experience in American 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Lectures, discussions, and research in the Afro- American in American education, 
including the struggle for literacy, contributions of Afro- Americans to theory, philo- 
sophy and practice of education in the public schools, private and higher education. 
Traces the development of school desegregation, its problems and plans. 

CUIN-628. Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education Credit 3(1-4) 

A synthesis of practical experiences, ideas and issues pertinent to more effective 
teaching in urban areas. 



141 



CUIN-629. Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 638) 

Methods, techniques and materials used in the diagnosis of reading problems in 
the kindergarten-primary area through the intermediate level. Attention upon the 
pupil and the interpretation of physiological, psychological, sociological, and educa- 
tional factors affecting learning to read. Opportunity for identification, analysis, 
interpretation on, and strategies for fulfilling the reading needs of all pupils. 

CUIN-630. Reading Practicum Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 639) 

Application of methods, materials and professional practices relevant to teaching 
pupils. Provisions for participation in and teaching of reading. Designed to coordi- 
nate the student's background in reading, diagnosis, learning, and materials. Super- 
vised student teaching. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours in reading. 

CUIN-631. Reading for the Atypical Learner Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 640) 

Attention to the gifted child, the able retarded, the slow learner, the disadvan- 
taged, and the linguistically different child. Special interest groups will be formed 
for investigation reports. 

CUIN-641. Cultural Diversity— Perspectives and Credit 3(3-0) 

Teaching Implications 

Psychological and sociological influences on culturally different learners and their 
development with emphasis on the special teaching methods, materials and activi- 
ties. A consideration of groups of American Indians, Negroes, Puerto Ricans, urban 
poor, rural poor, Mexican Americans, Mountain white, and migrant workers who 
may be culturally deprived. 

CUIN-683. Curriculum in Early Childhood Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 683) 

Curriculum experiences and program planning appropriate to nursery, kinder- 
garten, and primary education. An examination of theoretical models, bases of 
curriculum, and objectives relevant to early childhood education. 

CUIN-684. Methods in Early Childhood Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 684) 

Administration, principles, practices, methods, and resources in the organization 
of preschool and primary programs. An interdisciplinary and team approach. 
Observation for teaching styles and strategies. 

Graduate 

CUIN-700. Introduction to Graduate Study Credit 2(2-0) 

Methods of research, interpretation of printed research data, and use of bibliogra- 
phical tools. 

CUIN-701. Philosophy of Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical study of and a philosophic approach to educational problems. The nature 
and aims of education in a democratic society, relation of the individual to society, 
interests and disciplines, play and work, freedom and control, subject matter and 
method. 

CUIN-702. Reading in Modern Philosophy of Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Study and analysis of selected topics in philosophy of education. 
CUIN-703. Educational Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

The school as a social institution, school-community relations, social control of 
education, and structure of school society. 



142 



CUIN-704. Professional Development of Media Personnel Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Educational Media 704) 

A course designed to meet specific needs of the media practitioner to include 
critiques of problems, individualized projects in problem-solving; overview of cur- 
rent issues and trends in media. 

CUIN-705. Programmed Instruction Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Educational Media 700) 

Theory, principles, application, and evaluation of programmed instruction tech- 
niques, survey of programmed techniques, the selection, utilization, and evaluation 
of existing programs. Survey of commercial programs, sources and types of teaching 
machines. Practice in writing programmed instruction units. 

CUIN-706. Media Retrieval System Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Educational Media 701) 

A survey of various media classifications, storage and retrieval models as applied 
to information centers and their operation. Compares traditional models with the 
logic of manual, mechanical, and electronic retrieval systems. Writing models for 
independent study. 

CUIN-707. Workshop in Education Media Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Educational Media 702) 

An exploration of recent materials, methods, and techniques and the development 
of skills and competencies in audiovisual communications. Demonstrations and 
presentations by specialists, audiovisual representatives. Does not count toward 
degree unless specifically approved. 

CUIN-708. Research in Educational Media and Internship Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Education Media 703) 

This is a professional laboratory designed to provide the student with on-the-job 
training and direct experiences relating to his "needs" and interest in operating, 
organizing, and administering a well-rounded media program and the opportunity 
to develop research into an area related to the practical experiences. 

CUIN-709. Introduction to Theories in Media Communication Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Educational Media 709) 

Considers concepts, principles, and theoretical orientation from fields of social 
psychology, communication and general systems. Competencies to include identifi- 
cation of authors and contributions as related to role of various media communica- 
tions and technologies in the process of learning and culture transmission. 

CUIN-710. Educational Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

The essential vocabulary, concepts, and techniques of descriptive statistics as 
applies to problems in education and psychology. 

CUIN-711. Methods and Techniques of Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Careful analysis and study of research problems; techniques and methods of 
approach. 

CUIN-712. Advanced Information Services Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Educational Media 711) 

Analysis of print and non-print resources of specific interest to adult learners. 
Examination of tools of instruction, bibliographic resources; occupational literature, 
testing and measurement data, readers' advisory services and programs; self-paced 
and auto-tutorial study programs. 

CUIN-713. Computers in Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Educational Media 713) 

Review of the use of the computer in instruction and related communication. 
Examination of research on the area; use of various hardware and software conf igu- 

143 



ration; programming language; methods of course and lesson development and 
production of teaching program utilizing the computer or related use of computer in 
communication in education. 

CUIN-715. Advanced Production in Instructional 

Radio and Television Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Educational Media 715) 

An in-depth study of advanced methods and techniques necessary to produce 
quality instructional radio and television programs. Experimentation, innovations, 
and research will be encouraged and high production standards in keeping with 
those of Commercial Stations. Student-produced programs may be braodcast on a 
cooperative basis over local radio and television facilities. Prerequisite: Curriculum 
and Instruction 609 or approvel of instructor. 

CUIN-716. Techniques in Multi-Media Design, 

Production and Presentation Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Educational Media 716) 

Application of theories and practices in graphics and film production; utilization 
of equipment and practice in incorporating two or more media in slide-tape, film loop 
and/or comparable presentation. 

CUIN-717. Media Services to Business and Industry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Educational Media 717) 

A corollary course offering that deals with the nature of needs in communication 
for specific complexes and audiences; design of messages; public relations, market- 
ing and public persuasion, adult learner theories; multi-media production tech- 
niques and presentations. Designed for the media major and/or practitioner inter- 
ested in options in broadening career fields. 

CUIN-718. Media in Special Education and Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide personnel in special education reading pro- 
grams with experiences that will enable them to develop competencies and skills in 
the operation, care, and utilization and production of instructional materials and 
equipment pertinent to the achievement of their instructional objectives. 

CUIN-720. Curriculum Development Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts and modern trends in curriculum development for grades K-12; the 
purposes, objectives, and programs of the school; the relationships of allied subject 
areas to curriculum development; the relationship of the community; and the contri- 
butions and interrelationships of administrative personnel, other personnel, and lay 
persons to curriculum development. This course has a required field experience. 

CUIN-721. Curriculum in the Elementary School Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 721) 

Basic concepts of curriculum and curriculum development with attention to cur- 
riculum issues and to desirable instructional practices in the elementary school. 

CUIN-722. Curriculum in the Secondary School Credit 3(3-0) 

Curriculum development, functions of the secondary school, types of curricula; 
emphasis on trends, issues, and innovations. 

CUIN-723. Principles of Teaching Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the status of teaching as a profession in the United States; teacher 
obligations, responsibilities and opportunities for leadership in the classroom and 
community with special emphasis on principles of and procedures in teaching. 

CUIN-724. Problems and Trends in Teaching Science Credit 3(3-0) 

Attention to major problems of the high school teacher of science. Lesson plans, 
assignments, tests, etc., constructed and administered by each student in class. 
Audiovisual materials, demonstration and laboratory techniques carried out. 



144 



CUIN-725. Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

Survey of major problems in the broad field of social studies and consideration of 
improved ways in presentation and class economy, including lesson plans, assign- 
ments, audiovisual materials, and other means of facilitating learning. 

CUIN-726. Reading in the Content Areas Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 739) 

Attention on reading problems and procedures and materials for improving read- 
ing in the social studies, science, English, mathematics, foreign language, home 
economics, and other fields. 

CUIN-727. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern 
Mathematics for Junior and Senior 
High School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

Model lesson plans, use of educational media, geometric and trigonometric de- 
vices, Truth Tables, and intuitive and formal logic in the teaching of modern mathe- 
matics in the junior and senior high school. 

CUIN-730. Problems in the Improvement of Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 740) 

Study of current problems, issues, trends and approaches in the teaching of 
reading including investigations of underlying principles of reading improvement; 
coverage of appraisal techniques, materials and procedures, innovative and correc- 
tive measures; and application of research data and literature. Prerequisite: A 
previous graduate course in reading. 

CUIN-731. Advanced Diagnosis in Reading Instruction Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 741) 

The diagnosis and treatment of reading difficulties. Study and interpretation of 
selected tests useful in understanding and analyzing physiological, psychological, 
sociological and educational factors related to reading difficulties. Case studies and 
group diagnosis. 

CUIN-732. Organization and Administration of Reading 

Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 742) 

Administrative acts requisite to the creation and guidance of a well-balanced, 
school-wide reading program. For all school personnel who are in a position to make 
administrative decisions regarding the school reading program. 

CUIN-733. Advanced Practicum in Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 743) 

Actual experiences with youth and teachers in professional activities. 

CUIN-734. Seminar and Research in Reading Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 744) 

Evaluation of recent research concerning findings, approaches, innovations, and 
organization of reading instruction. Selected topics for reports and research pro- 
jects. Independent study of selected topics of experimentation. Prerequisite: 24 
semester credit hours in graduate courses. 

CUIN-775. Independent Reading in Education I Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 785) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

CUIN-776. Independent Reading in Education II Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading. 786) 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 



145 



CUIN-777. Independent Reading in Education III Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 787) 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

CUIN-780. Comparative Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical and international factors influencing the development of national sys- 
tems of education, recent changes in educational programs of various countries. 

CUIN-781. Issues in Elementary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 781) 

A critical review of the background and functions of the elementary school as a 
social institution. Attention is given to increasing the ability to formulate the gener- 
alizations of development and learning into a meaningful framework for appraising 
current educational thinking and practice and predicting the direction in which 
these must move if elementary school programs are to continue to improve. 

CUIN-782. Issues in Secondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the role of the high school as an educational agency in a democracy. 
Attention is given to: (1) philosophical, psychological, and sociological bases for the 
selection of learning experiences; (2) contrasting approaches to curriculum con- 
struction; (3) teaching methods and materials; (4) evaluation procedures; and (5) 
school-community relationships. 

CUIN-783. Current Research in Elementary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 783) 

A critical analysis of the current research in elementary education and the impli- 
cations of such for elementary school educative experiences. 

CUIN-784. Current Research in Secondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical analysis of the current research in secondary education and the implica- 
tions of such for high school educative experiences. 

CUIN-S-785. Independent Readings in Education I Credit 1(0-2) 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

CUIN-S-786. Independent Readings in Education II Credit 2(2-4) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

CUIN-S-787. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3(0-6) 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

CUIN-S-790. Seminar in Educational Problems Credit 3(1-4) 

Intensive study, investigation, or research in selected areas of education; reports 
and constructive criticism. Prerequisites: A minimum of 24 hours in prescribed 
graduate courses. 

CUIN-S-791. Thesis Research Credit 3 



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Department of Economics 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

ECON-601. Economic Understanding Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the principles of economics utilizing the macro approach. No 
credit towards a degree in economics. 

ECON-602. Manpower Problems and Prospects Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of manpower development problems and prospects, with particular 
reference to the problems of unemployment, underemployment and discrimination. 
The course will focus on problem measurement, evaluation of existing policy and 
prospects for achievement of all human resource development. The course will invite 
an interdisciplinary participation on the part of students and faculty. Prerequisites: 
Econ. 300 or 301; Econ. 305 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. 

ECON-603. Manpower Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Manpower planning centers chiefly on the adjustment necessary to adapt labor 
resources to changing job requirements. This course is designed to prepare students 
to create plans which will facilitate this adjustment. This course will attempt to 
acquaint the student with labor force and labor market behavior such that he is able 
to make planning decisions relating to job creation (increasing demand) and educa- 
tion and training (increasing supply). Planning will be done at both the national 
(macro) and local (micro) levels, with special emphasis on the latter. We will further 
attempt to evaluate all planning decisions by use of Cost-Benefit Analysis or Multiv- 
ariate Analysis. Prerequisites: Econ. 300 or 301; Econ. 305 or equivalent, or consent 
of the instructor. 

ECON-604. Economics Evaluation Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

The course will cover needed tools of research design, statistical reporting, cost 
benefit analysis and other related techniques for internal and external evaluations of 
human resource development programs. The course is designed both for inservice 
personnel currently employed by agencies, and for the regular student enrolled in a 
degree-granting program. 

ECON-610. Consumer Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature, scope and tools of 
consumer economics. It is particularly oriented to minority groups, thus focusing on 
the economic choices currently affecting groups with rising incomes and aspirations. 
This course will consider the economic choices faced by the consumers in maximiz- 
ing satisfaction with limited means. 

ECON-615. Economics, Political and Social Aspects of the 

Black Experience Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the political, economic and social tools of current public policy treating 
the subject of race in America. This course will examine the economic and social 
conditions of income inequality and explore the national commitment to equal oppor- 
tunity. Special emphasis will be placed on illustrations from North Carolina and 
adjacent states. 

ECON-626. Physical Distribution Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of alternative sources of transportation for moving raw materials into the 
production facility and finished goods into the channels of distribution. Illustrates 
integration of transportation decisions with those of production, inventory, ware- 
housing and marketing management. Uses quantitative and non-quantitative con- 
cepts for plant and warehouse location decisions. 

ECON-690. Special Topics in Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

An in-depth examination of selected problems and analytical techniques in eco- 
nomics not covered in other courses. Course contents may vary from semester to 
semester. May not be repeated for credit. 

147 



Graduate 

ECON-701. Labor and Industrial Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

Two important sectors of the economy are examined — Labor and Management. 
Historical, public and governmental influences are studied. 

ECON-705. Government Economic Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will consider the growth of public expenditures and revenues, and debt 
of the United States; theories of taxation and tax incidence; and the effects of public 
expenditures and taxes on economic growth. 

ECON-710. Economic Development and Resource Use Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with resource and economic development in the domestic econ- 
omy. A comparison is drawn among developed, developing and undeveloped 
societies. 

ECON-720. Development of Economic Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

An analytical approach to the study of various economic systems, how these 
systems developed and how they are organized to carry on economic activity. 

Transportation 

ECON-650. Transportation Law Credit 3(3-0) 

A detailed review of the development of transportation law will be made. An 
analysis of the Interstate Commerce Act and its impact on surface carriers will be 
completed. This course will assist those students planning to take the bar exam for 
the Interstate Commerce Commission or those students studying for the Transporta- 
tion Law exam in the American Society of Traffic and Transportation series. Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 461 — Legal Environment of Business or equi- 
valent is recommended. 

ECON-660. National Transportation Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

A seminar on national transportation problems. This course will involve readings 
and research on several issues in transportation. Previous policy statements will be 
reviewed in light of current needs to determine what the current national transpor- 
tation policy should be. 

Department of Educational Leadership and Policy 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

EDLP-650. Special Problems in Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Adult Education 650) 

Special topics, individual and group study projects, research, workshops, semi- 
nars, summer institutes, travel study tours and organized visitations in areas of adult 
education worked out and agreed upon by participating students and the Depart- 
ment of Educational Leadership and Policy. 

EDLP-651. Introduction to Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Adult Education 651) 

The purpose is to develop a view of Adult Education as a broad, diverse, and 
complex field of study, research and professional practice. Students will survey 
many institutions, forms, programs, and individual activities, for insight into the 
scope of Adult Education, its client group, and their reasons for becoming adult 
learners, and the range of methods and materials used to enable adults to learn. 

EDLP-652. Methods in Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Adult Education 761) 

Methods of informal instruction, group leadership, conference planning and tech- 
niques in handling various issues of interest to adults. For persons preparing to 

148 



conduct adult education programs as well as those preparing to serve as instructors 
or leaders in the public schools and/or in various agencies serving adults. 

EDLP-653. Adult Development and Learning Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Adult Education 653) 

The focus is on adult development psychology and learning theory. Adult devel- 
opment and learning is grounded in human developmental psychology, and enables 
students to investigate the life. From the research literature of adult life stages, 
students will be asked to read works of Freud, Havinghurst, Erickson, Gould, 
Levinson, Valliant, and Klemme. 

EDLP-654. Gerontology Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ault Education 654) 

The basic purpose of this course is to study the process of aging. Attention will be 
given to the influence of cultural, sociological, and economic factors. An important 
phase of the course will deal with planning for retirement. 

EDLP-688. School Law and the Teacher Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of statutory and case law relating to the teacher, the student and the 
teaching learning environment, with special emphasis on the rights and responsibil- 
ities of the teacher and the student. 

EDLP-689. Contemporary Issues in Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Familiarize students, managers, administrators and civic leaders with survival 
skills necessary for job effectiveness and efficiency. 

EDLP-690. The Community College and Postsecondary) 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Philosophy, organization and character of school programs needed to meet educa- 
tional needs of individuals who desire to continue their education on the post- 
secondary level. Special attention is given to the trends in developing community 
colleges. Prerequisites: Education 727, or a graduate course in high school curricu- 
lum; Psychology 726, or graduate course in Human Development and Services, or 
three or more years of teaching experience. 

Graduate 

EDLP-700. History and Philosophy of Continuing Education Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Adult Education 700) 

A study of historical and philosophical foundations and thought which have influ- 
enced how adult needs have been met through learning. Consideration will be given 
to the thinking upon which teaching and learning were based during ancient times 
through the present time. 

EDLP-701. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of 

Adult/Continuing Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Adult Education 701) 

An examination of theories, concepts, and practices as related to the functions 
planning, organizing, staffing, financing, motivating, decision making evaluating 
and delegating in an Adult Education organization. 

EDLP-702. Practicum in Teaching Adults Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Adult Education 702) 

Practical experience involving a group of adults in a teaching learning experience. 
Under supervision the practice teacher will have an opportunity to apply concepts, 
teaching methods, and instruction materials in a real life situation. Prerequisites: 
Educational Leadership Policy 651, 653, and 700. 



149 



EDLP-703. Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult 

Continuing Education Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Adult Education 703) 

This course is integrative in nature, thereby offering the student an opportunity to 
synthesize concepts, theories, and methods of teaching learned in earlier courses. 
Students will be encouraged to further explore areas of special interest. 

EDLP-704. Independent Study Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Adult Education 704) 

This course permits a student to undertake an analysis of a problem through 
individual study outside the traditional classroom setting. The problem may be 
selected from either travel, hobby, or a related job experience. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

EDLP-705. Thesis Research in Adult Education Credit to be arranged 

(Formerly Adult Education 705) 

EDLP-740. Introduction to Educational Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Development of management theory and its application to school administration, 
the functions of management, and the broad task areas of educational administration 
such as program services, personnel services, pupil personnel services and finance. 

EDLP-741. The Governance of Public Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Organization and control of public education at the federal, state, and local level, 
including legal and political aspects. 

EDLP-755. Supervision of Instruction Credit 3(3-0) 

Modern concepts and techniques of supervision; the roles of the supervisor, princi- 
pal, and consultant in curriculum development; and the procedures, problems, and 
materials of supervising and improving instruction in grades 1-12. 

EDLP-757. Problems in Supervision of the Elementary School Credit 3(3-0) 

The nature, theory, and practice of supervision, and the supervisor's role in 
improvement of instruction. 

EDLP-765. Supervision of Student Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

A basic professional course for classroom teachers, principles, and supervisors 
who serve in an official capacity directing the field-laboratory experiences of student 
teachers. 

EDLP-758. Problems in High School Supervision Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of problems, techniques, and materials in the improvement of instruction 
in secondary schools. A course for principals, heads of departments, and supervisors. 

EDLP-759. Computer Applications for Administrators and Credit 3(3-0) 
Supervisors 

Experiences in various computer and software application for Educational 
Administration/Supervision. 

EDLP-760. The Junior High School Credit 3(3-0) 

The philosophy, organization, administration, curriculum and activities of the 
junior high school. 

EDLP-761. School Organization and Administration Credit 4(4-0) 

A comprehensive course in organization and administration of schools, grades 
K-12, placing primary emphasis on the following areas: (1) formal and informal 
organizational structure, concepts and practices; (2) the management processes; (3) 
the administrative functions, with particular reference to personnel, program, and 
fiscal management; and (4) leadership styles and the leadership role, with special 
attention to planning, decision-making, and conflict-resolution. 



150 



EDLP-762. The Principalship Credit 3(3-0) 

A professional education course for the principalship, examines the role of princi- 
pal in the modern school system with emphasis on planning, programming, and 
management functions. 

EDLP-763. Public School Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of school administration, the organization and structure of the school 
system; agencies of administration and control, legal basis of school administration, 
standards for administration in the various functional areas. 

EDLP-764. Pupil Personnel Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Pupil accounting, records and reports, financial reports, school census, special 
school reports, pupil adjustment and progress, health and safety, and legal aspects of 
pupil administration. 

EDLP-765. School Community Relations and Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the relationship between the school/school district and the community it 
serves; community structure, resources and services, inter-agency cooperation, 
community involvement, committees and volunteer services, publication and media 
relations; public information, business and organizational cooperation and their 
interrelation with the school/school district. 

EDLP-766. School Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the principles governing the selection and landscaping of school 
grounds, location and design of buildings, and care of plants from standpoint of use, 
sanitation, health and attractiveness. 

EDLP-767. Public School Finance Credit 3(3-0) 

A current study of the political, legal, and economic aspects of financing public 
education, with particular attention to school finance in North Carolina. Major areas 
include: (1) public education and the national economy; (2) the tax structure and 
sources of revenue; (3) resource allocation and methods of funding; (4) school finance 
reform; (5) school finance in North Carolina; and (6) practical experience in budget 
planning and development. 

EDLP-768. Principles of School Law Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the legal aspects of public education. Constitutional, statutory, and 
case law, with special attention to North Carolina law, provide the basis for under- 
standing the legal framework and examining legal principles pertaining to such 
areas as: (1) church-state-education relations; (2) race-state-education relation; (3) 
school districts; (4) school boards; (5) finance; (6) curriculum; (7) property; (8) teacher 
personnel; and (9) pupil personnel. 

EDLP-769. Problems in Educational Administration and 

Supervision Credit 3(3-0) 

An internship of field study on a supervised project arising out of the needs of the 
student. Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours, including Organization and Administra- 
tion, Supervision, and Curriculum Development. 

EDLP-770. Problems in Educational Supervision (Internship) Credit 3(3-0) 

An internship of field study on a supervised project arising out of the needs of the 
student. Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours, including Organization and Administra- 
tion; Supervision of Instruction; Curriculum Development; and Seminar in Educa- 
tional Problems (Research). 

EDLP-771. Program Development: Community Education Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of community needs assessment, community program design, program 
budgeting; grant writing; planning and infusion of education that is multi-cultural 
into the community education curriculum. 



151 



EDLP-772. Program Management: Community Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of organization and governance of community education, program imple- 
mentation, direction, supervision and evaluation. 

EDLP-773. Leadership Credit 3(3-0) 

Systematic examination of leadership and motivational theory and its application 
to educational administration. Application will place emphasis on leadership in such 
areas as planning, policy development, managing change, conflict and stress man- 
agement, resource procurement and allocation and time management. 

EDLP-776. Principles of College Teaching Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles involved in teaching at the college level: techniques of teaching aids, 
criteria used in evaluation. Prerequisite: Psychology 726, or graduate course in 
educational psychology. 

EDLP-777. Seminar in Postsecondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A synthesis of current research in postsecondary education relating to administra- 
tion, curriculum, and faculty development. Prerequisite: Education 690. 

EDLP-778. Student Personnel Services Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of student development programs in postsecondary institutions, includ- 
ing pre-admission, education, vocational, and personal counseling; career guidance 
services, attitude and interest assessment, student affairs, rights and responsibili- 
ties, and financial aid. 

EDLP-779. Technical Education in Community Junior 

Colleges Credit 3(3-0) 

Offers techniques in identifying community needs and in planning curriculums 
and courses for technical/ vocational education. Stresses the role of the two-year 
college in middle manpower development. 

EDLP-781. Internship Credit 3(3-0) 

Offers opportunities for students to spend one semester as a teaching or adminis- 
trative intern in a community college or technical institute in the North Carolina 
Community College System. Registration only by permission of the instructor. 

EDLP-785-A. Independent Readings in Education I Credit 1(0-2) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

EDLP-786-A. Independent Readings in Education II Credit 2(0-4) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

EDLP-787-A. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3(0-6) 

Individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

EDLP-790-A. Seminar in Education Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive study, investigation, or research in selected areas of education; reports 
and constructive criticism. Prerequisite: A minimum of 24 hours in prescribed 
graduate courses. 

EDLP-791-A. Thesis Research Credit 3(3-0) 

EDLP-792. Advanced Seminar and Internship in Education 

Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

Seminar and supervised internship experiences relating to problems in adminis- 
tration and to the needs and interests of the student (restricted to students in the 
Sixth- Year Program in Administration). 



152 



Department of Architectural Engineering 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

AREN-601. Advanced Reinforced Concrete Credit 3(3-0) 

Design and analysis of columns for axial loads, and biaxial bending. One way and 
two way slabs, multistory building frames, continuous beams, precast joists, foot- 
ings, retaining walls and pretressed and post tension beam design. 

AREN-602. Advanced Structural Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes the more complex concepts of structural analysis for 
determinate and indeterminate structural systems using both hand calculations and 
computer applications. 

AREN-803. Foundation Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

Subsoil investigations and design of foundations and other substructures. Caisson 
and cofferdam design and methods of construction-ground water control. 

AREN-604 Structural Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

The objective is to present building structural systems, their form and function. 
Also, design criteria, loading types and magnitudes, form work, construction loads, 
and construction times. Preliminary design techniques are presented and system 
evaluation techniques will be discussed. Other topics include the portal and canti- 
lever methods of approximate analysis. An introduction to computer-design will also 
be included. 

AREN-605 Masonry Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Concepts of reinforced masonry design. The properties of masonry materials will 
be reviewed and the procedures for the design of typical masonry components will be 
presented. 

AREN-606. Matrix Analysis of Structures Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of Matrix algebra; statically and kinematically indeterminate structures; 
introduction of flexibility and stiffens methods; applications to beans, plane trusses 
and plane frames. 

AREN-610. Energy and the Environment Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the global energy resources, consumption and pollution genera- 
tion duet to energy use. Various environmental regulations will be surveyed and the 
potential effect of new technologies and policies on the environment and global 
economy will be studied. Design projects are required. 

AREN-611. Energy Conservation in Buildings Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with the energy use patterns in schools and hospitals. Various 
utility rate structures and the relevant IES and ASHRAE Standards are examined. 
Energy auditing techniques along with the effect of operation and maintenance on 
building energy use are studied. Retrofit options and computerized Energy Man- 
agement Systems are covered. Design projects are required. 

AREN-612. HV AC System Design Credit 3(3-0) 

This course.deals with the fluid flow theory, duct-pipe design and selection of fans 
and pumps. Design methodology in sizing heat exchangers, terminal units, air 
controllers, air washers and cooling towers is covered. Primary and secondary 
systems are also studied. Design projects are required. 

AREN-620. Architectural Design IV Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory-lecture course presenting a series of problems in the design, analysis, 
and organization of buildings. Economic and social considerations are given to 
problems. Group planning, mass and orientation are studies for more complex 
building requirements. More detailed study and presentation is required to emphas- 
ize the complete architectural complex. 

153 



AREN-621. Advanced Architectural Design Credit 3(0-6) 

This course includes advanced studies in architectural design. The projects deal 
with the various aspects of building design, urban design, and community design in a 
comprehensive and integrated manner. 

AREN-622. City Planning & Urban Design Credit 3(1-4) 

Lecture and laboratory course. History of city planning and urban design; general 
problems of city planning and urban design-architectural space composition. 
Regional and urban planning; scale of the plan for region and city. Transportation in 
city; the city as a human unit. Greenery in the city. Location of the residential areas, 
industry, business and commerce, etc. Location critera. Design of the neighborhood 
unit. Prerequisite: Juniors enrolled in the program of the Transportation Institute 
and Architectural Engineering majors of Junior classification. Open to practicing 
design professionals. 

AREN-623. Integrated Building Design I Credit 3(0-6) 

Introduction to the holistic design approach including the functional and economic 
evaluation of alternative building systems from conceptual design, design develop- 
ment and construction documents. Topics include the principles of design, building 
code requirements, structural systems, M-E-P Systems and construct ability. 

AREN-624. Facilities Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Topics include: long range and master planning for facilities; space forecasting, 
planning and management; the design-build cycle; project management, forming 
and managing the design team; standards; budget justification; project estimating; 
purchasing; post occupancy evaluation. 

AREN-625. Computer- Aided Building Design Credit 3(0-6) 

Computer-aided drafting and design for architectural engineering problems. 
Introduces the student to the use of programs such as AUTO CAD as a design and 
production tool. 

AREN-660. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit Variable (3-0) 

Selected engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. The topics will be 
selected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to the programs of 
the student enrolled. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

AREN-642. Lighting Applications I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course applies to the principles of lighting design to the engineering of 
lighting systems. The course develops methodology for solving problems in both 
interior and exterior lighting. 

AREN-666. Special Topics Credit 3(3-0) 

Study arranged on a special engineering topic of interest to student, faculty 
member, who will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or experimental and 
encourage independent study. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

AREN-700. Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design II Credit 3(3-2) 

Advanced theory and methods applied to the design of reinforced concrete struc- 
tures, including yield line methods, ultimate strength theory and limit design. 
Prerequisite: AREN-601 or equivalent. 

AREN-701. Advanced Structural Analysis II Credit 3(3-0) 

The analysis of various types of structural problems, including the application of 
modem analytical methods. Prerequisite: AREN-602 or equivalent. 

AREN-703. Design of Buildings for Extreme Wind 

and Earthquake Forces Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of structural dynamics; response of buildings to earthquake induced 
forces; evaluation of earthquake forces using the response spectra; study of the 

154 



behavior of wind, variation in wind velocity with respect to topography and height 
above ground; the study of the response of building components of hurricanes and 
tornadoes. Prerequisite: 225-300, AREN-602. 

AREN-704. Finite Element Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Concepts of the finite element are used in the analysis of continuous beams, arches, 
retaining walls, piles multistory plane and space frames reinforced concrete slabs 
and matt foundations, cylindrical tanks and shell structures. 

AREN-705. Advanced Foundation Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

Concepts of soil mechanics are applied to particular cases of soil interaction with 
foundations of structures, bridge abutments, piles, caissons. Effect of vibrations on 
the stability of soil structures. 

AREN-706. Advanced Structural Steel Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Modern methods and advanced theory applied to the design of steel structures. 
Project design includes the solution to various types of framed structures. Prerequi- 
site: AREN-602 or equivalent. 

AREN-710. HVAC Systems Analysis & Simulation Credit 3(3-0) 

The analysis of HVAC computer programs which simulate component and system 
performance and energy use. 

AREN-711. Advanced Energy Conservation Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Advanced topics in thermal energy storage, district heating and cooling, waste 
heat recovery, and CO-generation. 

AREN-712. Energy Management Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Concepts of energy management planning for building complexes and multiple 
facilities. Topics include: data collection and analysis, facility audits, on-site measure- 
ments, operations and maintenance and economic impact analyses. . 

AREN-720. Facility Planning & Site Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Strategic and long range planning concepts, environmental impact studies. Popu- 
lation projections, growth, maintenance and retrofit, accessibility and economics. 

AREN-721. Computer-Aided Project Management Credit 3(3-0) 

The use of computers in project scheduling, manpower forecasting, cash flow 
analysis, progress reports, billings and profitability analysis. The emphasis is on the 
management of a small construction or consulting engineering firm. 

AREN-723. Professional Practice and 

Labor Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

Professional practice, ethics contract documents, project administration and 
office management. Labor law in contractor's language, employment standards, 
collective bargaining, special agreements, Occupational Safety and Health Act. 

AREN-724. Value Analysis in the Design 

& Construction of Buildings Credit 3(3-0) 

The use of simulation and mathematical modeling as design analysis tools to 
minimize building life cycle costs. Structural systems, heating and air conditioning 
systems, lighting and power, plumbing and fire protection systems are included as 
part of the analysis. Value engineering as applied to the design of buildings. 

AREN-731. Graduate Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

Presentation of research methodologies as required for a thesis or project. 
AREN-732. Integrated Building Design II Credit 3(1-4) 

Mathematical and computer-assisted techniques for integrated building design. A 
continuation of AREN-623 with a major emphasis on computer-aided design, par- 
ticularly as it applies to solving the interface problems between the various 
disciplines. 

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AREN-734. Energy & Maintenance Management Credit 3(3-2) 

Topics include: building energy-use systems and efficiencies, concepts of energy 
conservation, energy management and control systems, preventive maintenance, 
computer-based energy management and maintenance management systems. Life 
cycle building operation and maintenance costs. 

AREN-742. Illuminating Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

The course develops numerical methods and methodology for solving special prob- 
lems in lighting. Topics include advanced numerical methods and lighting design for 
exterior applications. The application and use of lighting energy codes and stand- 
ards are applied to lighting design. 

AREN-776. Project Credit 3(3-0) 

AREN-777. Thesis Credit 6(6-0) 

AREN-784. Advanced HVAC System Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Comprehensive HVAC design of complex facilities including hospitals and high 
rise buildings. 

AREN-789. Special Topics Credit 3(3-0) 

Department of Chemical Engineering 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate * 

CHEN-600. Advanced Process Control Credit 3(3-0) 

The course covers advanced methods of controlling chemical processes: adaptive 
control, feed-forward control, cascade control, multi-variable control, multi-loop 
control, decoupling, and deadtime compensation. Emphasis is placed on computer 
control; Z-transforms, sampled-data systems; digital controller design. Prerequisite: 
CHEN 340, Senior standing in CHEN courses. 

CHEN-605. Biochemical Engineering Credits 3(3-0) 

The course covers the application of engineering principles to the design and 
control of fermentation processes. Topics included are biochemical production of 
industrial chemicals, mixer design, oxygen transfer in fermentors and the separa- 
tion of fermentor effluents. Corequisites: CHEN 400, CHEN 420. 

CHEN-610. Advanced Chemical Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

Thermodynamics 

This is an advanced course covering topics in molecular thermodynamics of fluid 
phase equilibria. Statistical thermodynamics and thermodynamics of nonequili- 
brium processes are introduced. Prerequisite: CHEN 310. 

CHEN-620. Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Students apply advanced mathematical techniques to the solution of chemical 
engineering problems. Analytical and numerical methods for analysis of steady state 
and transient problems arising in heat and mass transfer, kinetics and reaction 
design are developed. Prerequisites: Senior standing in CHEN courses. 

CHEN-630. Transport Phenomena Credit 3(3-0) 

A unified approach to momentum, energy, and mass transfer withemphasis on the 
microscopic approach. Development of the differential transport balances. Applica- 
tions in solving simple chemical process problems. Prerequisites: CHEN 320 (with a 
C grade or higher), Math 331 or permission of the instructor. 



•Graduate courses in Chemical Engineering are listed under the MSE program. 



156 



Engineering 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

GEEN-601. Industrial Automation Credit 3(2-2) 

Automation and market competitiveness, sensors and measurements, circuit 
board design, material handling systems, production control, and CIMS. Laboratory 
experimentation in selected modern manufacturing technologies. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing in School of Engineering. 

GEEN-602. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory Credit 3(0-6) 

Students work in interdisciplinary teams to design and manufacture products 
based on the concept acquired in GEEN 601— Industrial Automation. Prerequisite: 
GEEN 601. 

GEEN-650. Interfacial Transport Phenomena Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental principles of phase interfaces. Surface tension, contact angle and 
dispersive forces. Study of suspensions, emulsions and foams. Applications in wet- 
ting, flotation, coating and dyeing. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

GEEN-660. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit Variable (1-3) 

Selected engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. The topics will be 
selected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to the programs of 
the students enrolled. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

GEEN-666. Special Projects Credit Variable (1-3) 

Study arranged on a special engineering topic of interest to student faculty 
member, who will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or experimental and 
encourage independent study. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



'Graduate courses in Chemical Engineering are listed under the MSE program. 



Graduate 



GEEN-710. Advanced Transport Phenomena Credit 3(3-0) 

An advanced treatment of the mechanisms of momentum, heat and mass trans- 
port. Methods of solution of transport problems with emphasis on coupled systems 
where two or more transport processes interact; Non-Newtonian Flow; Boundary 
Layer Theory; Analysis and solution of transport problems of significance in chemi- 
cal process. Prerequisite: ChE 300, ChE 320, ChE 400, ChE 420. 

GEEN-720. Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

An advanced treatment of chemical reaction engineering including effects of 
non-ideal flow and fluid mixing on reactor design. Multi-phase reaction system. 
Heterogeneous catalysis and catalytic kinetics. Prerequisite: ChE 420. 

GEEN-730. Advanced Biochemical Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

Advanced topics in biochemical engineering and enzyme engineering, highlight 
research trends. Modeling and optimization of biochemical systems. Design and 
analysis of enzyme reactors. Use of enzyme in industrial, environmental, and medi- 
cal applications. Prerequisite: ChE 605. 

GEEN-740. Advanced Chemical Process Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Topics in advanced conceptual process engineering: process analysis, process 
synthesis, process optimization. Specific topics include: flowsheeting, design varia- 
ble selection, computational algorithm formulation, separation sequences, heat 
exchanger networks, recycle-purge processes, process design and simulation soft- 
ware development including physical and thermodynamic properties packages. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

157 



GEEN-750. Separation Processes Credit 3(3-0) 

Differential and equilibrium stage operations involving non-isothermal and mul- 
ticomponent systems. Simultaneous mass transfer and chemical reaction; dispersion 
effects. Applications to important operations including absorption, extraction, 
chromatography, distillation, ion exchange and reverse osmosis membrane separa- 
tion. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

GEEN-760. Topics in Molecular Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Statistical ensembles and thermodynamics connection, classical statistical 
mechanics, ideal monatonic, diatonic and polyatonic gas, visial equation of state, 
distribution functions and liquid theory, integral equations, perturbation theory, 
MC and MD computer simulations, current topics, projects. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

GEEN-777. Thesis Credit Variable (1-6) 

GEEN-788. Research Credit Variable (1-3) 

Advanced research in an area of interest to student and instructor. 

GEEN-789. Special Topics Credit Variable (1-3) 

Study of advanced topics selected prior to the offering and pertinent to student's 
programs of study. 

Department of Civil Engineering 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate* 

CIEN 600. Expert Systems Applications in Civil Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

Introductory overview of artificial intelligence with an emphasis on Civil Engi- 
neering applications: What they are, how they are applied today, a discussion of when 
they should and should not be used and what goes into building them. Emphasis is on: 
task selection criteria, knowledge acquisition and modeling, expert system architec- 
tures (control and representation issues), and testing and validation. Course 
requirements will include the design and development of a working system in a 
chosen application area. 

CIEN 602. Civil Engineering Systems Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduces mathematical modeling techniques for the solution of Civil Engineer- 
ing problems. This includes the formulation of mathematical representations of 
complex civil engineering systems and their evaluation via linear programming, 
dynamic programming, non-linear programming and the use of formal heuristics. 
Multiobjective analysis, project management and civil engineering planning and 
design are also presented. 

CIEN 610. Water and Wastewater Analysis Credit 3(2-3) 

Laboratory and field methods for the measurements and analysis of water. 
CIEN 614. Stream Water Quality Modeling Credit 3(3-0) 

Mathematical modeling of water quality in receiving streams. Topics include: The 
generation of point and nonpoint sources of pollutants; the modeling and prediction 
of the reaction, transport and fate of pollutants in the stream; and the formulation 
and solution of simulation models. 

CIEN 616. Solid Waste Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of collection, storage, transport and disposal of solid 
wastes. Examination of various engineering alternatives with appropriate consider- 
ation for air and water pollution control and land reclamation are emphasized. 

CIEN 618. Air Pollution Control Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to air pollution and its control. Topics include: sources, types, and 

158 



characteristics of air pollutants; air quality standards; and engineering alternatives 
for achieving various degrees of air pollution control. 

CIEN620. Foundation Design I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will introduce the following topics: behavior and design of retaining 
walls and shallow foundations; earth pressure; bearing capacity and settlement; 
stress distribution and consolidation theories; settlement of shallow foundations. 

CIEN 622. Soil Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will introduce the following topics: behavior of soil examined from a 
fundamental perspective; review of methods of testing to define response, rationale 
for choosing shear strength and deformation parameters for soils for design 
applications. 

CIEN 624. Seepage and Earth Structures Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will introduce the following topics: seepage through soils; permeabil- 
ity of soils; embankment design; compaction; earth pressures and pressures in 
embankments; slope stability analysis; settlements and horizontal movements in 
embankments; and landslide stabilization. 

CIEN 626. Soil and Site Improvement Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will introduce the following topics: methods of soil and site improve- 
ment; design techniques for dewatering systems; grouting; reinforced earth; in-situ 
densif ication; stone columns; slurry trenches; and the use of geotextile. Construction 
techniques for each system are described. 

CIEN 628. Applied Geotechnical Engineering Analysis 

and Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Introductory course in subsurface hydrology including: Principles of fluid (water) 
in saturated and unsaturated materials, well hydraulics, various methods of subsur- 
face water flow systems, infiltration theory, and schemes for ground water basin 
management. 

CIEN 630. Construction Engineering and Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course concentrates on the solution to problems in Construction Engineering 
and Management. A variety of problems from the construction industry are pre- 
sented to the students. The students form teams to develop solutions to these prob- 
lems. Topics vary with available projects and student interest. Graduate students 
select a project in their area of interest for intensive study and a report. 

CIEN 640. Advanced Structural Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of CIEN 340 emphasizing the more complex concepts 
of structural analysis for determinate and indeterminate structural systems using 
both hand calculations and computer applications. 

CIEN 641. Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of CIEN 540 emphasizing the more complex concepts 
of reinforced concrete design. The design of continuous beams, two slabs and beams 
columns are addressed. 

CIEN 642. Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures Credit 3(3-0) 

This course uses the ACI and AASHTO codes to analyze and design prestressed 
concrete structures. 

CIEN 644. Finite Element Analysis I Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of continuous structural systems as assemblages of discrete elements. 

159 



Applications of the finite element method is made to the general field of continuum 
mechanics. Convergence properties and numerical techniques are discussed. 

CIEN 646. Structural Design in Steel Credit 3(3-0) 

This course uses the AISC code to analyze and design steel structures. 
CIEN 648. Structural Design in Wood Credit 3(3-0) 

This course uses the wood product code to analyze and design wood structures. 
CIEN 650. Geometric Design of Highways Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with the development and application of geometric design con- 
cepts for rural systems. Topics include: functional classifications, design controls 
and criteria, elements of design, cross section elements, and intersection design. 

CIEN 652. Urban Transportation Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces urban transport planning using a decision oriented 
approach. Discussions focus on the decision making process, data requirements, 
evaluation processes, systems performance analysis and program implementation. 

CIEN 656. Traffic Engineering Credit 3(2-2) 

Theory and practice of the operation aspects of Transportation Engineering. 
Specific applications will deal with the operation, design, and control of highways 
and their networks. Topics include: data collection techniques, traffic flow theory, 
and various highway capacity methods and their theoretical basis. The various 
application software available for each topic. 

CIEN 658. Pavement Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Application of multilayer theories for design of highway and airport pavement 
structures. Flexible and rigid pavement design methods are covered with discus- 
sions focusing on their theoretical basis and their major differences. Topics include: 
cost analysis and pavement selection, drainage, earthwork, pavement evaluation and 
maintenance. 

CIEN 660. Water Resources System Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Mathematical modeling techniques. Formulation of mathematical representa- 
tions of complex water resources systems and their evaluation via linear program- 
ming, dynamic programming, non-linear programming and by the use of formal 
heuristics. Models for optimal sewer design, optimal sequencing (or capacity expan- 
sion) of projects, reservoir systems planning and management are presented. 

CIEN 662. Water Resources Engineering Credit 3(2-2) 

This course involves the application of hydrologic and hydraulic principles in the 
analysis and design of water resources systems. The measurement of ground water 
parameters and general water quality parameters is covered. Topics covered 
include: water supply and distribution, reservoirs, water resources system econom- 
ics, water law, hydroelectric power, flood control, water resources planning and 
development and drainage. 

CIEN 664. Open Channel Flow Credit 3(3-0) 

Advanced topics in open channel flow, design of open channels for uniform and 
nonuniform flow, wave interference, roughness effects, flow over spillways, water 
surface profiles, and energy dissipation methods. Some computational methods in 
open channel flow are presented. 

CIEN 666. Design of Hydraulic Structures and Machinery Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis and design of water regulating structures including dams, spillways, 

160 



outlet works, transition structures, conduit systems and gates. Application of basic 
principles of fluid mechanics and hydraulics to the design and selection of pumps, 
turbines and other hydraulic machinery. Applications to multipurpose design 
involving water supply, irrigation, flood control and navigation. 

CIEN668. Subsurface Hydrology Credit 3(3-0) 

Introductory course in subsurface hydrology including: principles of fluid (water) 
in saturated and unsaturated materials, well hydraulics, various methods of subsur- 
face water flow systems, infiltation theory, and schemes for ground water basin 
management. 

CIEN 699. Special Projects Credit 3(3-0) 

Study arranged on a special civil engineering topic of interest to the student and 
faculty. Topics may be analytical and/or experimental with independent study 
encouraged. 



*700 level graduate courses in Civil Engineering are offered under the MSE program. 

Department of Electrical Engineering 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

ELEN-602. Semiconductor Theory and Devices Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the phenomena of solid-state conduction and devices using band models; 
excess carriers in semiconductors; p-n junctions and devices; bipolar junction tran- 
sistors field effect transistors; integrated circuits. Prerequisites: 227-406 and 
ELEN-460. 

ELEN-614. Integrated Circuit Fabrication Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

Device technology for the fabrication of silicon integrated circuits. Techniques 
will be applicable to bipolar and MOS transistor structures, LSI and VLSI circuits. 
Oxidation, diffusion, epitaxy and ion implantation processes will be studied. Limits 
on device design and performance; compound semiconductor device technology. 
Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-615. Silicon Device Fabrication Laboratory Credit 2(0-2) 

Laboratory experiments in the fabrication of silicon devices. P-N junctions diodes, 
metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors and (MOS) field effect transistors will 
be fabricated. Oxidation, diffusion and photolithographic techniques will be pre- 
sented. Prerequisite: ELEN-614 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-616. Introduction to Microprocessors Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to microprocessor systems with emphasis on software design. A 
popular microprocessor system will be used as the basis for the course. Program- 
ming techniques that lead to error free programs using assembly language will be 
emphasized. Prerequisite: ELEN-427. 

ELEN-617. Microprocessor Hardware Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Microprocessor architectures and supporting components, RAMS, ROMS, 
PORTS, timers, etc. are studied. I/O structures in microcomputers, interrupts, 
DMA operations and interfacing problems are also addressed. Emphasis will be 
placed on microcomputer development from the device to the system level. Prerequi- 
site: ELEN-616. 

ELEN-619. Microprocessor Laboratory Credit 2(0-2) 

Experiments are geared to provide students with practical understanding of 
microprocessor systems design techniques, including memory, I/O interfacing 
interrupts and DMA operations. A student project provides an opportunity for 

161 



students to gain experience in using the microcomputer in typical applications in 
process control, test equipment communication, etc. Prerequisite: ELEN-616, 
Corequisite: ELEN-617 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-627. Switching Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of design techniques for systems at the gate and flip flop level with 
applications to both combinational and sequential logic circuits. Functional minimi- 
zation and state minimization algorithms, timing problems, and state assignment 
are discussed. MSI and LSI circuits are also discussed. Prerequisite: ELEN-427. 

ELEN-629. VLSI Design Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the principles for designing large scale integrated systems. Emphasis is 
placed upon implementation of combinational logic and sequential machines as 
regular structures such as PLA's and iterative networks. CAD techniques and 
circuit simulation methods are discussed. MOS devices and their properties are also 
studied. Prerequisite: ELEN-627. 

ELEN-633. Digital Electronics Credit 3(3-0) 

Families of logic; resistor-transistor logic (RTL), integrated-injection logic (ILL), 
diode-transistor logic (DTL), transistor-transistor logic (TTLL), emitter coupled 
logic (ECL), MOS gates and CMOS gates. Basic digital structures; Flip-flops, regis- 
ters and counters, interface between digital and analog signals. Prerequisite: 
ELEN-460. 

ELEN-636. Balanced Power Systems at Steady State Credit 3(3-0) 

This course entails the study of modern electric power systems during normal 
steady state operation. Topics covered include analysis to obtain transmission line 
parameters, steady-state performance of transmission lines, performing network 
reduction, load flow analysis, and solving the economic dispatch problem. Prerequi- 
site: ELEN-430 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-637. Unbalanced Power Systems at Steady State Credit 3(3-0) 

This course entails the study of modern electric power systems during unbalanced 
steady state operation. Topics covered include: (1) discrete time modeling of trans- 
mission lines; (2) sequence network formulation; (3) fault types and fault analysis. 
Prerequisite: ELEN-430 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-638. Advanced Power Systems Laboratory Credit 2(0-2) 

Experiments and students projects related to the practical application of power 
system analysis techniques for transmission line and electric machine parameter 
estimation, system level simulation and, etc. Prerequisite: ELEN-436 or consent of 
instructor. 

ELEN-642. Solid State Energy Conversion Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of semi-conductor and solar radiation principles. Operation and design of 
solid state thermoelectric generators. Operation and design of solar cells. Use of solar 
collectors and solar cells in terrestrial applications. Prerequisites: MEEN-406 and 
ELEN-460 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-647. Introduction to Telecommunications Networks Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces telecommunication network utilization and design. Em- 
phasis is on using and designing voice, video, and image digital networks. 

ELEN-649. Modulation Theory & Communication Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental principles of modulation theory applied to amplitude, single and 
double side band, frequency, pulse amplitude, pulse duration, pulse code and multi- 
plexing modulation methods and their application to communication systems are 
studied. Random signals, noise considerations and probability theory are intro- 
duced. Prerequisites: ELEN-300, ELEN-320, and 225-500. 



162 



ELEN-650. Digital Signal Processing I Credit 3(3-0) 

Develop working knowledge of basic signal processing functions such as digital 
filtering, spectral analysis, and detection/post detection processing. Methods of 
generating the coefficients of the digital filters will be derived. Alternate structures 
for filters such as indefinite impulse response and finite impulse response will be 
compared. The effect of finite register length will be covered. Prerequisites: ELEN- 
400 & 225-500 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-651. Digital Signal Processing Laboratory Credit 2(0-2) 

Experiments and students projects related to the practical application of digital 
signal processing techniques for data acquisition, digital filtering, control, spectral 
analysis. Communications, etc. Prerequisite: ELEN-400, Corequisite: ELEN-650. 

ELEN-656. Probability & Random Processing Credit 3(3-0) 

Sample space and events, conditional probabilities, independent events, Bayes' 
formula, discrete random variable, continuous random variable, expectation of 
random variable, joint distribution, conditional expectation, Markov chains, sta- 
tionary processing, ergodicity, correlation and power spectrum of stationary pro- 
cesses. Gaussian processes. Prerequisite: ELEN-400. 

ELEN-660. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit Variable (1-3) 

Selected engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. The topics will be 
selected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to the programs of 
the students enrolled. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

ELEN-666. Special Projects Credit Variable (1-3) 

Study arranged on a special engineering topic of interest to student and faculty 
member, who will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or experimental and 
encourage independent study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

ELEN-668. Automatic Control Theory Credit Variable (1-3) 

The automatic control problem; review of operational calculus; state and transient 
solutions of feedback control systems; types of servo-mechanisms and control sys- 
tems; design principles. Prerequisite: ELEN-400 for equivalent. 

ELEN-672. Analog Electronics Credit 3(3-0) 

Circuits and systems of linear electronics studied. Design techniques for linear 
integrated circuits technology are emphasized. Core topics include: Operational 
amplifiers, A/D and D/A converters, function generator and voltage regulators. 
Selected topics on: Feedback amplifiers, oscillators, PLL (Phase Locked Loop), 
consumer electronics, noise. Prerequisite: ELEN-460. 

ELEN-674. Genetic Algorithms Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the theory and application of genetic algorithms. Prerequisite: 
ELEN-400. 

ELEN-678. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces neural network design and development. Emphasis is on 
designing and implementing information processing systems that autonomously 
develop operational capabilities in adaptive response to an information environment. 
Prerequisite: ELEN-400 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-705. Solid State Devices Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with advanced treatment of bipolar junction and field effect 
transistors; heterostructure devices (e.g., heterojunction bipolar transistors and 
solar cells); devices and simulation. Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of the 
instructor. 



163 



ELEN-706. Semiconductor Material and Device 

Characterization Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers electrical, optical and physical/chemical characterization of 
semiconductor materials and devices. Laboratory experiments/demonstrations will 
be presented on selected characterization techniques. Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or 
consent of the instructor and advisor. 

ELEN-707. Physical Tensor Properties of Crystals Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with the physics of compound semiconductors, bulk epitaxial 
crystal growth, superlattices, structural and electronic characterization, contacts, 
photonic devices and integrated devices. Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of 
instructor. 

ELEN-709. Solid State Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents the physical properties of solids, including crystal lattice 
structure, energy band structure, and electrons in periodic lattices. The Boltzmann 
transport equation will be presented and various scattering mechanisms will be 
investigated. Prerequisite: ELEN-705 or consent of instructor and advisor. 

ELEN-721. Fault-Tolerant Digital System Design Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers reliability, test generation, self-checking techniques, principles 
and applications of fault-tolerant design techniques. Prerequisite: ELEN-627. 

ELEN-723. System Design Using Programmable Logic 

Devices Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will cover and compare many commercially available Programmable 
Logic Devices and consider their applications in both combinational and sequential 
logic system design. Students will also be familiarized with hardware description 
language ABEL™ and shown how design ideas can be efficiently translated into 
device programs. Prerequisite: ELEN-627. 

ELEN-727. Switching and Finite Automata Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Abstract mathematical modeling of combinational and sequential switching net- 
works. A study of finite automata theory and fault tolerant concepts with applica- 
tions to both combinational networks and finite state machines. Prerequisite: 
ELEN-627. 

ELEN-729. Digital System Credit 3(3-0) 

Architecture and design of general purpose and special purpose digital systems 
will be covered. Special emphasis will be placed on those systems for which VLSI 
design techniques may be applied. Systolic algorithms, array processors and pipe- 
line processors will be covered. Prerequisites: ELEN-627, ELEN-629 and 
ELEN-650. 

ELEN-736. Power System Control and Protection Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with control systems associated with a modern power system, 
and relay protection applications. Prerequisites: ELEN-636 or ELEN-637. 

ELEN-737. Computer Methods in Power Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with designing and using software for modeling and analyzing 
electric power systems. The student will also gain experience with commercially 
available software commonly used by electric power utilities. Prerequisites: ELEN- 
636 or ELEN-637. 

ELEN-740. Advanced Topics in Analog Circuits Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is intended to: (1) familiarize the student with the concepts of the 
International Standards Organization Open Systems Interconnection (ISO OSI) 
standards for the seven layer network model; (2) introduce two analysis and optimi- 
zation techniques of interest to computer networking; (3) to illustrate some technical 
issues encountered in current networks. Prerequisite: ELEN-647. 



164 



ELEN-746. Electromagnetic Wave Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Electrostatics; dipoles and multipoles, boundary value problems. Magnetostatics; 
magnetic dipoles and multipoles; boundary value problems. EM waves in dielectric 
slabs. Geometric optics of EM waves. Radiation, scattering and diffraction, as ap- 
plied to optical systems. Prerequisite: ELEN-450 or equivalent. 

ELEN-747. Advanced Topics in Analog Circuits Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with a wide variety of applications of analog circuits in the areas 
of communication, power systems and controls, neural networks, signal processing, 
optoelectronics, and digital system interfacing. Prerequisite: ELEN-450 or 
equivalent. 

ELEN-748. Information Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers topics in classical information theory such as entropy, source 
coding, channel coding, and rate distortion theory. Several related topics are dis- 
cussed, including entropy for Markov sources, and entropy for n th extension of 
sources. Prerequisite: ELEN 612. 

ELEN-750. Digital Signal Processing II Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of Digital Signal Processing I. Homorphic filtering simulation of 
dynamical systems, random functions, correlation and power spectra will also be 
covered. Prerequisite: ELEN 650 or consent of the instructor. 

ELEN-756. Optical Electronics Credit 3(3-0) 

Optical source devices: LED, injection lasers; photodetectors; visible and infrared. 
Optical waveguide components, repeaters, modulators, multiplexors, demultiplex- 
ers, switches, logic elements. Opto-electronic interfacing; fiber-fiber coupling and 
interfacing. Prerequisites: ELEN 450, 602 or consent of the instructor. 

ELEN-760. Theory of Linear Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

State space representation of dynamical systems. Analysis techniques for linear 
models in control systems, network theory, and signal processing. Continuous, dis- 
crete and sampled representations. Prerequisites: ELEN 668 or the equivalent. 

ELEN-761. Discrete Time Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis and synthesis of discrete time systems are carried out using z-transform 
and state variable representations. The controllability, observability, stability, 
criteria, sampled spectral densities, correlation sequence, optimum filtering, and 
control of random processes are covered. Prerequisite: ELEN-668 or the equivalent. 

ELEN-762. Network Matrices and Graphs Credit 3(3-0) 

Use of vector space techniques in the description, analysis and realization of 
networks modeled as matrices and graphs. The course investigates vector space 
concepts in the modeling and study of networks. The system concept of networks is 
introduced and explored as a dimensional space consideration in terms of matrices 
and graphs. Prerequisite: ELEN 400 or the equivalent. 

ELEN-770. Digital Image Analysis and Computer Vision Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with concepts and techniques for digital image analysis and 
computer vision. Topics include image formation, filtering, edge extraction, image 
segmentation, geometrical structures, regional and geometrical feature extraction, 
knowledge representation, object understanding and recognition. Prerequisite: 
ELEN-650. 

ELEN-777. Thesis Credit Variable (1-6) 

ELEN-778. Neural Network Design Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the design of neural network systems using backpropagation, 
multifunction hybrid neural networks and neuro-fuzzy networks. Prerequisite: 
ELEN-678 or the equivalent. 



165 



ELEN-780. Machine Vision for Intelligent-Robotics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of visual/non-visual sensor technologies for the intelligent 
control of a robot. The course will cover image understanding, non-contact sensor 
analysis, and data fusion for intelligent robotics system design. Prerequisite: ELEN- 
650 or the equivalent. 

ELEN-788. Master's Project Credit Variable (1-3) 

This course deals with advanced research in an area of interest to student and 
instructor. 

ELEN-789. Special Topics Credit Variable (1-3) 

Study of advanced topics pertinent to student's program of study. 
ELEN-799. Ph.D. Thesis 



Department of Industrial Engineering 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 



INEN-615. Industrial Simulation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course addresses simulation languages. One general simulation language is 
taught in depth. The use of simulation modeling in design and improvement of 
production and service systems is emphasized. Design projects are required. Pre- 
requisites: INEN 210 and INEN 320 or consent of the instructor. 

INEN-621. Engineering Cost Control and Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to emphasize the use of accounting data internally by 
engineers as a key participant in all functions of management. It focuses upon the 
systems design concepts in job order costing, process costing and Just-in Time (JIT) 
inventory in manufacturing organizations. Design projects are required. Prerequi- 
site: INEN 265. 

INEN-624. Production Systems Credit 3(2-2) 

This course focuses on Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Computer-Aided Manu- 
facturing (CAM) and their integration. Topics include numerical control, robotics, 
computer vision and sensors. Topics in concurrent engineering are also addressed. 
Design projects are required. Prerequisite: INEN 410. 

INEN-625. Information Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces design implementation and evaluation of information sys- 
tems. Structured analysis and design techniques, organization of data and current 
software tools are introduced. Current database technologies are presented. The role 
of information systems as an integration tool for manufacturing systems is also 
stressed. Design projects are required. Prerequisite: INEN 210. 

INEN-632. Robotic Systems and Applications Credit 3(2-2) 

This course addresses applications and justification of robotics. Principal topics 
include anatomy and characteristics of robots, end effectors, vision systems, pro- 
gramming and application criteria for industrial robots. Design projects are 
required. Prerequisite: INEN 410. 

INEN-635. Materials Handling Systems Design Credit 3(2-2) 

This course focuses on design, and analysis of materials handling and flow in 
manufacturing facilities. Principles, functions, equipment and theoretical ap- 
proaches in materials handling are discussed. Tools for the automation of materials 
handling are introduced. Design projects are required. Prerequisites: INEN 210 and 
INEN 365. 



166 



INEN-645. Advanced Facilities Design Credit 3(2-2) 

This course focuses on modeling design and location of production facilities. Topics 
include computer simulation of production facilities, analytical models, location 
theory, workplace design and preventive maintenance. Design projects are required. 
Prerequisites: INEN 365 and INEN 400. 

INEN-650. Operations Research II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers an introduction to probabilistic operations research models and 
solution techniques. Specific topics covered include basic ideas of stochastic pro- 
cesses, Markov chains, queuing models and their applications, and decision analysis 
including Bayesian methods. Prerequisites: INEN 200 and INEN 400. 

INEN-658. Project Management and Scheduling Credit 3(3-0) 

Project scheduling is addressed using Critical Path Method (CPM) and Project 
Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT). Theory of scheduling is discussed. 
Applications in flow shops, job shops, cellular manufacturing and project environ- 
ments are explored. Approaches used include mathematical optimization, heuris- 
tics, and simulation. Design projects are required. Prerequisite: INEN 310. 

INEN-662. Reliability Credit 3(3-0) 

This course reviews the statistical concepts and methods underlying procedures 
used in reliability engineering. Topics include the nature of reliability and mainte- 
nance, life failure and repair distributions, life test strategies, and complex system 
reliability including: series/parallel/standby components with preventive mainte- 
nance philosophy. Prerequisite: INEN 200. 

INEN-664. Safety Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

This course addresses the history and legislation of the Occupational Safety and 
Health Act. The approach to accident causation is compared with task/operator/ma- 
chine/environment. The methods of investigating and analyzing accidents and the 
design of safety programs and procedures are discussed. Design projects are 
required. Prerequisites: INEN 200 and INEN 420. 

INEN-665. Man/Machine Systems Credit 3(2-2) 

This course introduces behavioral and psychological factors such as sensory, per- 
ception and attention, decision making and cognitive processes. This course empha- 
sizes the applications of these factors to the design and development of man-machine 
systems. Design projects are required. Prerequisite: INEN 420. 

INEN-716. Engineering Statistics II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the fundamental principles of planning, designing and 
analyzing statistical experiments for engineering applications. Parametric statis- 
tics such as analysis of variance and non-parametric statistics are covered. Prerequi- 
site: INEN 200. 

INEN-718. Advanced Quality Control Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers concepts, theories and current statistical control methods with 
emphasis on optimal product design and process optimization. Total quality man- 
agement and world-wide quality standards will also be discussed. Prerequisite: 
INEN 325. 

INEN-730. Industrial Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course addresses advanced statistical issues in the design of simulation exper- 
iments: variance reduction, regeneration methods, performance optimization and 
run sampling. Continuous simulation models are introduced. Current research top- 
ics in simulation are discussed. Prerequisite: INEN 615. 

INEN-733. Advanced Operations Research Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers selected topics in optimization theory, computational issues, 
and applications including non-linear programming, integer programming, multi- 
criteria optimization, and network optimization. Prerequisite: INEN 310. 

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INEN-735. Human-Computer Interface Credit 3(3-0) 

This course addresses the critical parameters in designing the human-computer 
interface. The emphasis is on software psychology as it relates to the human informa- 
tion processing system and modern interaction paradigms. Prerequisites: INEN 665 
and INEN 716. 

INEN-740. Decision Support Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces artificial intelligence tools. Concepts such as knowledge 
representation and inference mechanisms are presented. The development of expert 
systems for industrial engineering applications is emphasized. Prerequisite: INEN 
625. 

INEN-745. Manufacturing Automation Credit 3(2-2) 

This course addresses the principles relating to integration issues for an auto- 
mated manufacturing enterprise. Topics include control architectures, communica- 
tion networks and standards for graphical information interchange. Current 
research areas will be discussed. Design projects are required. Prerequisite: INEN 
650 or equivalent. 

INEN-749. Inventory Systems Analysis and Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Demand forecasting with emphasis on statistical techniques and smoothing. 
Inventory control system philology. Study of deterministic and probabilistic inven- 
tory systems. Use of lagrange multipliers, dynamic programming and queuing in 
inventory control. Introduction to queuing theory. Prerequisite: ENEN 335. 

INEN-777. Thesis Credit Variable (1-6) 

INEN-778. Research Credit Variable (1-3) 

Advanced research in an area of interest to student and instructor. 

INEN-789. Special Topics 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

MEEN-602. Advanced Strength of Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

Stress-strain relations as applied to statically indeterminate structures, bending 
in curved bars, plates, shells, and beams on elastic foundations; strain energy con- 
cepts for formulation of flexibility matrix on finite elements; bending in beams and 
plates, introduction to cartesian tensor notation and matrix structural analysis. 
Prerequisites: MEEN 336, MATH 332 or equivalent. 

MEEN-604. Intermediate Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of particle and system dynamics, then introduction to rigid body dynamics 
with solution techniques for the non-linear systems of ordinary differential equations 
as initial value problems. Angular and linear momentum, energy and Langrangian 
methods of body problems. Generalized variables, small vibrations, gyroscopic 
effects and stability. Prerequisites: MEEN 337, MATH 332 or equivalent. 

MEEN-606. Mechanical Vibrations Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the dynamics of systems with and without external damping, 
stability, lumped and distributed masses. Vibration isolation mounts and central 
systems are analyzed with classical differential equations, electromechanical analo- 
gies and computer methods. Prerequisites: MEEN 440, MATH 332 or equivalent. 

MEEN-608. Experimental Stress Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and methods of experimental stress analysis. Photo-elastic and micro- 
measurement techniques applied to structural models; student project work. Pre- 
requisites: AREN 457 or MEEN 602 or equivalent. 



168 



MEEN-610. Theory of Elasticity Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction; stress; strain-strain relations; energy principles; special topics. Pre- 
requisites: MATH 332 and MEEN 336 or equivalent. 

MEEN-612. Modern Composite Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts of strength, stiffness, micro-mechanics, fracture, time-dependent 
properties, interfacial relationship, etc. as related to composite materials. The prop- 
erties and fabrication of reinforcement materials such as whiskers, poly-crystalline 
inorganic fibers, metals, and boron filaments, glass, fibers, reinforced plastics, 
metals, and other modern composite materials. Prerequisite: MEEN 602 or 
equivalent. 

MEEN-614. Mechanics of Engineering Modeling Credit 3(3-0) 

Engineering modeling techniques including time dependent integration simula- 
tion models of systems, finite difference and finite element methods in mechanics. 
Prerequisites: MEEN 210, MEEN 336, MATH 332 or equivalent. 

MEEN-618. Numerical Analysis for Engineers Credit 3(3-0) 

Scientific programming, error analysis, matrix algebra, eigenvalue problems, 
curve-fitting approximations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integra- 
tion, solutions to simultaneous equations, and numerical solutions of differential 
equations. Prerequisite: MEEN 210 or equivalent. 

MEEN-619. Computer Aided Graphics and Design Credit 3(3-0) 

The principles of computer graphics and interactive graphical methods for prob- 
lem solving and mechanical design. Emphasis placed on both development and use of 
graphical tools for various purposes. Prerequisites: GEEN 101, MEEN 440 and 
MEEN 210 or equivalent. 

MEEN-626. Advanced Fluid Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Derivation of Navier-Stokes Equations, continuity equation and energy equation; 
exact solutions of Navier-Stokes Equations, invicid flow, potential theory, complex 
potentials and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MEEN 416 or equivalent. 

MEEN-636. Design of Thermal Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Selection of components in fluid and energy-processing systems to meet system 
performance requirements; computer-aided design; system simulation; optimiza- 
tion techniques; and investment economics. Prerequisite: MEEN 562 or equivalent. 

MEEN-640. Materials Forming Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and application of materials processing. Hot and cold working; forging, 
rolling; wire and tube drawing; extrusion, deep drawing, bending, stretch forming, 
upsetting, spinning, explosive and high energy forming. Formability Lubrication, 
die design, viscous materials. Prerequisites: MEEN 226 and MATH 332 or 
equivalent. 

MEEN-642. Materials Joining Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and application of joining of meals, ceramics, and plastics by the standard 
industrial techniques, arc, gas, electron beam, laser, ultrasonic, diffusion bonding. 
Principles of the use of phase diagrams, diffusion equations, and physical/chemical 
properties in joining considerations. Prerequisites: MEEN 226 and MATH 332, or 
equivalent. 

MEEN-644. Theories of Machining Processes Credit 3(3-0) 

Material behavior characteristics. Metal cutting analysis, mechanics of chip for- 
mation, thermal aspects, built-up edge and chip curl, tool wear and tool life. Three 
dimensional machining. Cutting fluids, cutting tool material. Unconventional 
machining processes: electric discharge machining (DM), electro-chemical machin- 
ing (ECM), Ultrasonic grinding, electron beam, laser, plasma-arc. Economics of 
machining processes. Prerequisites: MEEN 226 and MATH 332 or. equivalent. 



169 



MEEN-645. System Measurement and Process Control Credit 3(3-0) 

An elementary course designed for mechanical engineers to develop microproces- 
sor based "real time" programming techniques for advanced CAD/CAM. Emphasis 
is placed on the applications: Microcomputer components in CAD/CAM systems, 
information and power, position control with a stepping motor, process control using 
a state counter, data selection and data distribution. Two packages are to be used in 
this course: ISA-PADDS package and ECM package. Prerequisite: consent of the 
instructor. 

MEEN-647. Computational Engineering Kinematics Credit 3(3-0) 

Development of computer-oriented methods for the analysis and modeling of 
engineering kinematics systems; applications of interactive graphics for machine 
and mechanism design. Comparative study of the dynamic range of several commer- 
cially available packages including IMP, ADAMS, DRAMS, KINSYN and others. 
Prerequisite: MEEN 440 or consent of instructor. 

MEEN-648. Computer Controlled Manufacturing Credit 3(3-0) 

Concepts of Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Numerical Control and Group 
Technology. Manufacturing process interfacing, discrete process modeling, analysis 
and control techniques and algorithms. Characteristics and software of control 
computers. Sensors for computer control. Programmable controllers and sequential 
control. Prerequisites: MEEN 226, MATH 331, or consent of the instructor. 

MEEN-649. Design of Robot Manipulators Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamentals of kinematics, dynamics, computer graphics, sensing devices, meas- 
urements and control in robot manipulators. Prerequisites: MEEN 440, MEEN 619 
or equivalent. 

MEEN-650. Mechanical Properties and Structure of Solids Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the elastic and plastic behavior of matter in relation to its 
structure, both macroscopic and microscopic. Major representative classes of mate- 
rials to be examined are thermoplastic materials, elastomers, glasses, ceramics, 
metals, and composites. Prerequisite: MEEN 560 or equivalent. 

MEEN-651. Flight Vehicle Structures Credit 3(3-0) 

This technical elective covers the determination of typical flight and landing loads 
and methods of analysis and design of aircraft structures to be able to withstand 
expected loads. Finite element methods and software are utilized. Prerequisites: 
MEEN 336, MEEN 337, MEEN 442, and MATH 332. 

MEEN-652. Aero Vehicle Stability and Control Credit 3(3-0) 

This technical elective course covers longitudinal, directional, and lateral static 
stability and control of aerospace vehicles. It also covers linearized dynamics analy- 
sis of the motion of a six degree of-freedom flight vehicle in response to control inputs 
and disturbance through the use of the transfer function concept, plus control of 
static and dynamics behavior by vehicle design (stability derivatives) and/or flight 
control systems. Prerequisites: MEEN 415, MEEN 422, and ELEN 410. 

MEEN-653. Aero Vehicle Flight Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

This technical elective course covers the basic dynamics of aerospace flight vehi- 
cles including orbital mechanics, interplanetary and ballistic trajectories, powered 
flight maneuvers and spacecraft stabilization. Prerequisites: MATH 332, MEEN 
337, and MEEN 422. 

MEEN-654. Advanced Propulsion Credit 3(3-0) 

This technical elective is a second course in propulsion. It covers the analysis and 
design of individual components and complete air-breathing propulsion systems 
including turbo fans, turbo jets, ram jets, and chemical rockets. Prerequisite: 
MEEN 576. 



170 



MEEN-655. Computational Fluid Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

This technical elective course provides an introduction to numerical methods for 
solving the exact equations of fluid dynamics. Finite difference methods are emphas- 
ized as applied to viscous and inviscid flows over bodies. Students are introduced to a 
modern Computational Fluid Dynamics computer code. Prerequisites: MATH 332, 
and either MEEN 415, or MEEN 416. 

MEEN-656. Boundary Layer Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the fundamental laws governing flow of viscous fluids over solid 
boundaries. Exact and approximate solutions are studied for various cases of boun- 
dary layer flow including laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows. Prerequisites: 
MEEN 415 or MEEN 416. 

MEEN-657. Strengthening Mechanisms in Commercial 

Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

This course bridges the gap between fundamental materials science courses and 
advanced mechanical properties courses. A primary objective of the course is to 
provide the student with an understanding of the principles and mechanisms 
involved in strengthening processes. The course provides a review of current micro- 
structural and micro-chemical approaches used in developing high strength mate- 
rials. Prerequisite: MEEN 560 or equivalent. 

MEEN-660. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

This course consists of selected mechanical engineering topics of interest to stu- 
dents and faculty. The topics will be selected before the beginning of the course and 
will be pertinent to the programs of the students enrolled. Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. 

MEEN-702. Continuum Mechanics Credit 3(3-0) 

The applications of the laws of mechanics and thermodynamics to the continuum: a 
rigorous development of the general equations applied to a continuum, the applica- 
tion and reduction of the general equations for specific cases of both solids and fluids. 
Prerequisite: MEEN 336 or equivalent. 

MEEN-704. Advanced Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Lagrange's equations of motion as applied to rigid body dynamics. A study of 
generalized coordinates, generalized conservative and dissipative forces, degrees of 
freedom, holonomic constraints as related to rigid body motion. Also, a brief study of 
the calculus of variations and Hamilton's equations of motion. Prerequisite: MEEN 
604 or equivalent. 

MEEN-706. Theory of Vibrations Credit 3(3-0) 

Vibration analysis of systems with one, two or multi-degrees of freedom. Instru- 
mentation, continuous systems, computer techniques. Prerequisites: MEEN 440, 
MATH 332, and MEEN 581. 

MEEN-707. Real Time Analysis of Dynamic Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and application of real time analysis used in system identification and 
machinery fault detection. RTA can be applied in production engineering and 
product development to study short-lived events or analyze system operation in time 
domain or frequency domain to identify system characteristics or possible problems. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MEEN-708. Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics Credit 3(3-0) 

The use of energy methods in solving applied mechanics problems; applications 
include topics such as beans and frames, deformable bodies, plates and shells, 
buckling, variational methods. Prerequisite: MEEN 610 or equivalent. 

MEEN-710. Advanced Theory of Elasticity Credit 3(3-0) 

The analysis of strains, stresses, and the equations of elasticity, general formula- 



171 



tion of the 2-D boundary value problems, and the formulation of certain three 
dimensional problems with symmetry. Prerequisite: MEEN 610 or equivalent. 

MEEN-712. Theory of Elastic Stability Credit 3(3-0) 

Beam-columns, buckling of bars, frames and beams; torsional buckling; buckling 
of rings, curved bars, and arches; bending and buckling of thin plates and shells. 
Introduction to dynamic stability. Prerequisite: MEEN 602 or equivalent. 

MEEN-714. Mathematical Theory of Plasticity Credit 3(3-0) 

A review of elasticity including the stress and strain tensors, transformations and 
equilibrium and elastic behavior. Theories of strength, plastic stress/strain, classical 
problems of plasticity including thick-walled pressure vessels and rotating cylinders 
in elastic-plastic conditions, slip line theory with applications. Prerequisite: MEEN 
610 or equivalent. 

MEEN-716. Finite Element Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers fundamental concepts of the finite element method for linear 
stress and deformation analysis of mechanical components. Topics include the devel- 
opment of truss, beam, frame, plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric isoparamet- 
ric, solid, thermal, and fluid elements. ANSYS and NASTRAN software will be 
used for solving practical stress analysis problems. Prerequisite: MEEN 618. 

MEEN-719. Advanced Computer- Aided Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Currently important methods and techniques for using the computer to aid the 
design process. Simulation and optimization methods applied to the design of physi- 
cal systems. Prerequisites: MEEN 565, MEEN 619 or equivalent. 

MEEN-720. Advanced Classical Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts and postulates; conditions of equilibrium; processes and thermody- 
namic systems; first and second order phase transitions; Nernst Postulate. Prerequi- 
site: MEEN 442 or equivalent. 

MEEN-722. Statistical Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Statistical mechanics and macroscopic properties from statistical methods. Equili- 
brium information, generalized coordinates, and general variables. Prerequisite: 
MEEN 442 or equivalent. 

MEEN-724. Irreversible Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of processes which are inherently entropy producing. Development of 
general equations, theory of minimum rate of entropy production, mechanical pro- 
cesses, life processes and astronomical processes. Prerequisite: MEEN 720 or 
equivalent. 

MEEN-731. Conduction Heat Transfer Credit 3(3-0) 

Development of the general heat conduction equation. Applications to one, two and 
three dimensional steady and unsteady boundary value problems in heat conduction. 
Closed form and numerical solution techniques. Prerequisites: MEEN 562 or 
equivalent. 

MEEN-732. Convection Heat Transfer Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of heat convection in laminar and turbulent boundary layer and pipe 
flow; dimensional analysis; free convection; condensation and boiling. Prerequisite: 
MEEN 562 or equivalent. 

MEEN-733. Radiation Heat Transfer Credit 3(3-0) 

A comprehensive treatment of basic theories; radiation characteristics of surfaces 
and radiation properties taking account of wave length, direction, etc.; analysis of 
radiation exchange between idealized and real surfaces; fundamentals of radiation 
transfer in absorbing, emitting and scattering media; interaction of radiation with 
conduction and convection. Prerequisite: MEEN 562 or equivalent. 



172 



MEEN-734. Special Topics in Applied Heat Transfer Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected special topics in applied heat transfer such as heat exchanger design and 
performance, cooling of electronic equipment, advanced thermal insulation systems, 
etc. Prerequisite: MEEN 562 or equivalent. 

MEEN-738. Solar Thermal Energy Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Characteristic of extraterrestrial and terrestrial solar radiation. Analysis of 
thermal performance of concentrating and non-concentrating solar collectors, 
thermal energy storage systems and energy transport systems. Life cycle cost analy- 
sis of solar energy systems. Computer simulations. Prerequisites: MEEN 731 and 
MEEN 732 or equivalent. 

MEEN-740. Machine Tool Design Credit 3(3-0) 

Outlines and general requirements of machine tools. Design principles: static and 
dynamic stiffness and rigidity. Criteria for requirements on stiffness, weight and 
cutting forces. Machine tool vibrations, stability against chatter, general features, 
theories. Damping and dampers. Transmission of motion and standardization of 
speed change gears. Design of constructional elements: bearings, electrical compo- 
nents, pneumatic, hydraulics, material selection, main spindle layouts. Prerequi- 
sites: MEEN 564 and MEEN 644 or equivalent. 

MEEN-742. Tools, Jigs, and Fixtures Credit 3(3-0) 

Tool design methods, tool-making practices, tool materials and heat treatments, 
plastics for tool materials. Design of cutting tools for N/C machine tools. Design of 
size and fixture; basics of clamping, chucking and indexing for various machining 
processes. Prerequisites: MEEN 560, MATH 332 or equivalent. 

MEEN-746. Stochastic Modeling of Manufacturing Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves an engineering approach to the analysis of time series and 
discrete linear transfer function models. Applications include the analysis of experi- 
mental data for system modeling, identification, forecasting, and control. Prerequi- 
site: consent of advisor. 

NEEN-747. Computational Engineering Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Development of computer-oriented methods for the analysis and design of engi- 
neering dynamic systems; analytical and experimental techniques for modal devel- 
opment and design refinement of components in flexible dynamics systems (machine 
tools, robots, moving vehicles, etc.); optimization techniques for transient response 
analysis on both constrained and unconstrained systems. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

MEEN-748. Numerical Control in Manufacturing Credit 3(3-0) 

N/C systems, coding, feedback, point to point positioning and continuous path 
contouring, programming commands and addresses. Preparing manuscripts for 
multi-axis operations. Interpolation: linear, circular, parabolic for continuous path 
control. Preparatory functions, manuscript for a two-axis lathe, N/C electronics. 
Prerequisites; MEEN 210 and MEEN 644. 

MEEN-749. Computer Control of Robot Manipulators Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction of basic robot control systems, sensory requirements and capabilities; 
microcomputer control of robotic systems, robot teaching systems; adaptive robot 
control systems; robot system diagnosis and applications. Prerequisite: MEEN 649 
or consent of instructor. 

MEEN-750. Phase Equilibria Credit 3(3-0) 

Interpretation and mathematical analysis of unary, binary and ternary, inorganic, 
phase equilibria systems with examples for solving practical materials science 
problems; isophethal and isothermal sections, and crystallization paths; thermody- 
namic fundamentals. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



173 



MEEN-752. Mechanical Properties and Theories of Failure Credit 3(3-0) 

Static properties in tension and compression; stress and combined stresses; 
fatigue, impact, creep and temperature. Various theories of failure under the above 
loading conditions. Applications. Prerequisite: MEEN 336 or equivalent. 

MEEN-754. Deformation Analysis in Metal Processing Credit 3(3-0) 

Analytic approaches to the solution of forming problems. Following a review of 
stress strain analysis, the relationship of stress to strain via various plasticity equa- 
tions, yield conditions and deformation equations is examined. After the develop- 
ment of some methods of solution of forming problems, several model processes are 
examined; forging, extrusion, coining, rolling, and drawing. Prerequisites: MEEN 
226 and MEEN 560 or equivalent. 

MEEN-756. Physical Metallurgy of Industrial Alloys Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of principles of alloying and heat treatment and their application to 
commercially important alloy systems. Principles of corrosion. Prerequisites: 
MEEN 226 and MEEN 560 or equivalent. 

MEEN-758. Mechanical Metallurgy Credit 3(3-0) 

A review of continuum mechanics followed by an examination of the microscopic 
basis of plastic behavior. Emphasis on the development and use of dislocation theory. 
Prerequisite: MEEN 714. 

MEEN-766. Graduate Projects Variable (1-3) 

Independent Project Work on an advanced special topic of interest to the student 
and faculty member acting as advisor. Three credit hours of this course are required 
for the MSME project option. Topics may be analytical or experimental in nature 
and must be agreed upon by the advisor before students register for this course. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

MEEN-777. Thesis Variable (1-3) 

Thesis work. Prerequisite: Consent of the advisor. 

MEEN-788. Research Variable (1-3) 

Advanced research in an area of interest to student and instructor. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

MEEN-789. Special Topics Variable (1-3) 

A course designed to allow the introduction of potential new courses on a trial basis 
or offering of special course topics on a once only basic. The course may be offered to 
individuals or groups of students. A definite topic and title must be agreed upon by 
the advisor before students register for the course. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 



Department of English 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

ENGL-600. Language Variations in American English Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of regional and social dialects in the United States and a study of their 
interrelationship; examples of some of the motivations for dialectical divergences, 
especially in the instance of non-standard dialects; and a consideration of functional 
varieties and social dialect shifting. Prerequisites: English 310 or graduate stand- 
ing. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-603. Introduction to Folklore Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2498) 

Basic introduction to the study and appreciation of folkkore. (Cross listed as 
Anthropology 603.) (Offered in Spring/alternate years) 

174 



ENGL-620. Elizabethan Drama Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2741) 

Chief Elizabethan plays, tracing the development of dramatic forms from early 
works to the close of the theaters in 1642. Prerequisite: English 210, 220-221. 
(Offered in Spring/alternate years) 

ENGL-626. Children's Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2476) 

A study of the types of literature designed especially for students in the upper 
levels of elementary school and in junior high school. (Not accepted for credit toward 
graduate concentration in English.) Prerequisite: English 101, Humanities 200-201. 
(Offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

ENGL-627. Literature for Adolescents Credit 3(3-0) 

A course to acquaint prospective and in-service teachers with a wide variety of 
good literature that is of interest to adolescents. Emphasis on thematic approach to 
the study of literature, continental writers, book selection, and motivating students 
to read widely and independently with depth and understanding. Prerequisite: 
English 101, 200, and 201 or graduate standing. (Offered in Spring) 

ENGL-628. The American Novel Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2478) 

A history of the American novel from Cooper to Faulkner, Melville, Twain, How- 
ells, James, Dreiser, Lewis, Hawthorne, Faulkner, and Hemingway will be included. 
Prerequisite: English 210. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-650. Afro- American Folklore Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of folk tales, ballads, riddles, proverbs, superstitions and folk songs of 
black Americans. Parallels will be drawn between folklore peculiar to black Ameri- 
cans and that of Africa, the Caribbean, and other nationalities. (Offered in Spring) 

ENGL-652. Afro- American Drama Credit 3(3-0) 

A detailed study of the dramatic theory and practice of black American writers 
against the backdrop of Continental and American trends. Special attention will be 
given to the works of major figures from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. 
Works by Bontemps, Cullen, Hughes, Hansberry, Ward, Davis, Baldwin, Baraka 
(Jones), Gordone, and Bullins will be included. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-654. Afro- American Novel I Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by major 
black writers through 1940. Novelists emphasized include Dunbar, Chesnutt, Too- 
mer, McKay, Larsen, Hurston, Griggs, Fauset, and Wright. (Offered in Fall/alter- 
nate years) 

ENGL-656. Afro- American Novel II Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by major 
black writers after 1940. Novelists emphasized include Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, 
Himes, Demby, Williams, Walker, Brooks, Petry, Gaines, and Mayfield. (Offered in 
Fall/alternate years) 

ENGL-658. Afro- American Poetry I Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive study of Afro- American poetry from its beginning to 1940 with 
special attention given to poets of the Harlem Renaissance. Poets to be studied 
include Terry, Hammon, Wheatley, A.A. Whitman, Horton, Braithwaite, J. W. John- 
son, Home, Fenton Johnson, George Douglas Johnson, McKay, Cullen, Cuney, and 
Hughes. (Offered in Summer/alternate years) 

ENGL-660. Afro- American Poetry II Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive study of Afro- American poetry from 1940 to the present with consid- 
erable attention given to the revolutionary poets of the sixties and seventies. Poets to 

175 



be studied include Hughes, Walker, F.M. Davis, Brooks, Brown, Hayden, Tolson, 
Lee, Reed, Giovanni, Angelou, Jeffers, Sanchez, Redmond, Fabio, Fields, and Bar- 
aka. (Offered in Fall) 

ENGL-662. History of American Ideas Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of major ideas which have animated American thought from the begin- 
ning to the present. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-672. Independent Study in English Credit 3(3-0) 

Provides an opportunity for students to pursue independently in-depth study in 
literature, linguistics, or professional writing. Work done in literature in this course 
may serve as groundwork for students pursuing the thesis option. Prerequisites: 
Second semester junior, senior, or graduate standing, and prior consultation with 
department faculty. (Offered Fall, Spring and Summer) 

Graduate 

ENGL-700. Literary Analysis and Criticism Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2485) 

An introduction to intensive textual analysis of poetry, prose fiction, prose non- 
fiction, and drama. A study of basic principles and practices in literary criticism and 
of the various schools of criticism from Plato to Eliot. (Offered in Summer) 

ENGL-702. Milton Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2486) 

A study of the works of Milton in relation to the cultural trends of the seventeenth- 
century England. Emphasis is placed upon Milton's poetry. (Offered in Spring/al- 
ternate years) 

ENGL-704. Eighteenth Century English Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2487) 

A study of the major prose and poetry writers of the eighteenth century in relation 
to the cultural and literary trends. Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Fielding, Addison, Pope, 
Johnson, and Blake will be included. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-710. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers I Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2488) 

A course designed to provide elementary school teachers with an opportunity to 
discuss problems related to the language arts taught in the elementary school. (Not 
accepted for credit towards concentration in English.) (Offered in Summer/alter- 
nate years) 

ENGL-711. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers II Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of the study of relevant language situations with which elementary 
teachers should be concerned. Emphasis will be placed on strategies for guiding 
pupils to explore the nature and structure of language and for teaching essential 
language skills. (Not accepted for credit towards concentration in English.) (Offered 
in Summer/alternate years) 

ENGL-720. Studies in American Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2489) 

A study of major American prose and poetry writers. (Offered in Summer/alter- 
nate years) 

ENGL-749. Romantic Prose and Poetry of England Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2490) 

A study of nineteenth-century British authors whose works reveal characteristics 
of Romanticism. Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Lamb, Carlyle, and 
DeQuincey will be included. (Offered in Summer/alternate years) 



176 



ENGL-750. Victorian Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of nineteenth-century Victorian writing, including poetry, fiction, and 
non-fictional prose. Among the writers to be considered will be Tennyson, Browning, 
Arnold, Roseetti, Carlyle, Mill, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, Thackeray, and Hardy. 
(Offered in Summer/alternate years) 

ENGL-751. Modern British and Continental Fiction Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2491) 

A study of British and European novelists from 1914 until the present. Included in 
the study are Joyce, Kafka, Gide, Mann, and Camus. (Offered upon sufficient 
demand) 

ENGL-752. Restoration and 18th Century Drama Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2492) 

A study of the theatre and drama in relation to the cultural trends of the period. 
Etherege, Farquhar, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Fielding, Gay, Steele, Goldsmith, and 
Sheridan will be included. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-753. Literary Research and Bibliography Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2493) 

An introduction to tools and techniques used in investigation of literary subjects. 
(Offered in Fall) 

ENGL-754. History and Structure of the English Language Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2494) 

A study of the changes in the English language — syntax, vocabulary, spelling, 
pronunciation, and usage from the fourteenth century through the twentieth cen- 
tury. (Offered in Spring) 

ENGL-755. Contemporary Practices in Grammar Credit 3(3-0) 

and Rhetoric 
(Formerly English 2495) 

A course designed to provide secondary teachers of English with experiences in 
linguistics applied to modern grammar and composition. (Offered upon sufficient 
demand) 

ENGL-760. Non-fiction by Afro- American Writers Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of non-fiction by black writers including slave narratives, autobiogra- 
phies, biographies, essays, letters and orations. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-762. Short Fiction by Afro- American Writers Credit 3(3-0) 

An extensive examination of short fiction by Afro-American writers. Among those 
included are Chesnutt, Dunbar, Toomer, Hurston, McKay, Hughes, Bontemps, 
Wright, Clarke, Ellison, Fair, Alice Walker, Ron Milner, Julia Fields, Jean W. 
Smith, Petry, Baldwin, Kelley, and Baraka. (Offered in Spring/alternate years) 

ENGL-764. Black Aesthetics Credit 3(3-0) 

A definition of those qualities of black American literature which distinguishes it 
from traditional American literature through an analysis of theme, form, and tech- 
nique as they appear in a representative sample of works by black writers. (Offered 
upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-766. Seminar in Afro- American Literature 

and Language Credit 3(3-0) 

A topics course which will vary; focus will be on prominent themes and/or subjects 
treated by Afro- American writers from the beginning to the present. An attempt 
will be made to characterize systematically the idiom (modes of expression, style) of 
Afro- American writers. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 



177 



ENGL-770. Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2499) 

Provides an opportunity for presentation and discussion of thesis, as well as 
selected library or original research projects from non-thesis candidates. Prerequi- 
site: 15 hours of graduate-level courses in English. (Offered upon sufficient demand) 

ENGL-775. Thesis Research Credit 3(3-0) 

(Offered upon demand) 



Department of Foreign Languages 
French 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

FOLA-602. Second Language Teaching and Learning Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Problems & Trends in Foreign Language) 

Problems encountered by teachers given consideration. Place and purpose of 
foreign language in the curriculum today. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-603. Oral Course for Teachers of Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 502) 

Designed for teachers of foreign languages to improve pronunciation and spelling. 
Offered by demand. 

FOLA-606. Research in the Teaching of Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 503, 2573) 

Open to students who are interested in undertaking the study of a special problem 
in the teaching of a foreign language. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-607. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 302, 2574) 

Course presents Classicism through masterpieces of Corneille, Racine, Moliere 
and other authors of the "Golden Period" in French letters. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-608. French Literature in the Eighteenth Century Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 303, 2575) 

To study in particular the life and works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau, 
and the Encyclopedists. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-609. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 304, 2576) 

Study of the great literary currents of the Nineteenth Century Romanticism and 
Realism. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-610. The French Theatre Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 504, 2577) 

A thorough study of the French theatre from the Middle Ages to the present. 

FOLA-612. The French Novel Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 505, 2578) 

A study of the novel from the Seventeenth Century to the present. 

FOLA-614. French Syntax Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 506, 2579) 

Designed to teach grammar on the advanced level. Offered by demand. 



178 



FOLA-616. Contemporary French Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 305 and 2542, 2580) 

Course deals with the chief writers and literary currents from 1900 to the present. 
Offered by demand. 

Graduate 

FOLA-720. Advanced Reading and Composition Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 601 and 2580, 2585) 

An advanced study of the content and stylistics of selected contemporary writings. 
Assigned topics for compositions and explications de textes. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-722. Romantic Movement in France 

(Early Nineteenth Century) Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 602 and 2581, 2586) 

Background study of romanticism in works of Chateaubriand and Madama de 
Stael; emphasis placed on Lamartine, Hugo, Vigny and Musset; other writers and 
genres of the period will be studied. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-724. Seminar in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 603, and 2582, 2587) 

Readings and special topics in French. Presentations from students, faculty and 
guest lecturers. Paper showing research techniques in literary study are required of 
all candidates for a degree with concentration in French. Offered by demand. 

FOLA-726. Contemporary Literary Criticism Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 604, and 2583, 2587) 

Methods and purposes of literary criticism and of French literary criticis. Offered 
by demand. 

FOLA-728. Independent Study in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0 

(Formerly French 258, 2589) 

Independent study and research in a special area of the foreign language. Offered 
by demand. 



Department of Graphic Communication Systems and 
Technological Studies 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

TECH-610. Internship in Industry I Credit 3(0-7) 

Students participate in an industrial setting during a semester in his major field of 
interest. He/she will be evaluated during industry and a field diary of events and 
experiences. Three semester hours is the maximum to be earned during semester. 

TECH-611. Internship in Industry II Credit 3(0-7) 

Students participate in an industrial setting during a semester in his major field of 
interest. He/she will be evaluated on reports from industry and a field diary of events 
and experiences. Three semester hours is the maximum to be earned during a 
semester. 

TECH-616. Plastic Technology Credit 3(2-2) 

Operations in plastics are analyzed and demonstrated. The uses of plastics, how 
plastics are made and processed are explained. Projects suitable for class use are 
constructed. For teachers of Technology Education, arts and crafts, and those inter- 
ested in plastics. 



179 



TECH-617. General Crafts Credit 3(2-2) 

Principles and techniques of crafts used in school activity programs. Emphasis on 
materials, tools, and processes used in elementary schools and industrial arts 
courses. Open to all persons interested in craft instruction for professional or non- 
professional use. 

TECH-618. Vocational Education for Special Needs Students Credit 3(3-0) 

Opportunities provided for vocational teachers, counselors, and administrators to 
improve skills in working with disadvantaged/handicapped learners. Emphasis on 
motivational and creative instructional strategies, discipline drug abuse, module 
development. 

TECH-619. Curriculum Laboratory in Construction Technology 

Education Credit 3(2-2) 

Construction Technology Laboratory encompassing rationale, strategies, tech- 
niques, and media of teaching in the construction field. Specific teaching methods 
and curriculum approaches will be studied and explored. Secondary, post-secon- 
dary, and industrial settings will be studied. 

TECH-620. Curriculum Laboratory in Manufacturing Technology 

Education Credit 3(2-2) 

Manufacturing Technology Laboratory encompassing rational, strategies, tech- 
niques, and media of teaching in the manufacturing field. Specific teaching methods 
and curriculum approaches will be studied and explored. Secondary, post-secon- 
dary, and industrial settings will be studied. 

TECH-630. Photography and Educational Media Credit 3(2-1) 

Nomenclature, operation and maintenance of various still and motion picture 
cameras. The use of exposure meters, film processing, contact printing, slide prepa- 
ration, film editing, copying, enlarging, preparation and storage of chemical solu- 
tions, print spotting, dry mounting. 

TECH-631. Advanced Computer Aided Design Credit 3(2-2) 

Emphasis of the course will be utilization of "VERSA CAD" standards, conven- 
tions, devices, and experimentation in advance drafting and design practices using 
computer aided drafting software. Use of literature and research expected. For 
teachers with undergraduate preparation or trade experience. 

TECH-635. Advanced Principles of Graphic Communications 

Technology Credit 3(2-2) 

Advanced principles in graphic reproduction. Study of color applications, photo- 
graphic applications, design and pre-press techniques. Technical experiences in 
reproduction methods and quality control. 

TECH-655. Safety in the Instructional Environment of 

Technology Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and techniques of organizing and supervision safety in a Technology 
Education setting. Emphasis is placed on instructional strategies, state and national 
laws, special hazards, color coding, and accident analysis. This course is required for 
T&I certification by the State of North Carolina. 

TECH-660. Industrial Cooperative Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

For prospective teachers of vocational education. Principles, organization and 
administration of industrial cooperative education programs. 

TECH-661. Organization of Related Study Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of scheduling and planning pupil's course and work experience; select- 
ing and organizing related instructional materials in I.C.T. programs. Prerequisite: 
I.E. 660. 



180 



TECH-662. Industrial Course Construction Credit 3(3-0) 

Selecting, organizing and integrating objectives, content, media and materials 
appropriate to industrial courses. Strategies and techniques of designing and 
implementing group and individual teaching-learning activities to develop student 
interest awareness or specialization. Prerequisites: I.E. 462, 463, and 465. 

TECH-663. History and Philosophy of Vocational Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Chronological and philosophical development of vocational education with special 
emphasis on its growth and function in American schools. 

TECH-664. Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed for persons who teach or plan to teach middle grades occupational 
exploration programs. Emphasis will be placed on occupational exploration in the 
curriculum, sources and uses of occupational information, approaches to middle 
grades teaching, and philosophy and concepts of occupational education 

TECH-665. Middle Grades Industrial Laboratory Credit 3(3-0) 

Course organization, teaching strategies, resources and facilities for teaching 
industrial-tehnological career exploration in Middle Grades is stressed. Emphasis is 
on occupational clusters in manufacturing, construction, communication, transpor- 
tation, fine arts, and public service. 

TECH-666. Curriculum Modification for Vocational Education 

Special Needs Personnel Credit 3(3-0) 

For vocational teachers, administrators, and others interested in program modifi- 
cations for disadvantaged/handicapped learners. Emphasis on curriculum adap- 
tion, instructional planning, teaching strategies, media development, and perfor- 
mance assessment for special needs youth. 

TECH-668. Independent Studies in Industrial Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive study in the field of Industrial Education under the direction of a faculty 
advisor. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. 

TECH-669. Safety in the Instructional Environment of 

Technology Ed Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and techniques of organizing and supervising safety in a Technology 
Education setting. Emphasis is placed on instructional strategies, state and national 
laws, special hazards, color coding, and accident analysis. This course is required for 
T&I certification by the State of North Carolina. 

TECH-670. Introduction to Workplace Training and 

Development Credit 3(3-0) 

Overview of the field of training and development. Management concerns related 
to organizing, operating, and financing training and development programs are 
discussed. Roles common to practitioners across the broad field of Human Resource 
Development are covered. Interpersonal perspectives and implications for the future 
are included. 

TECH-67 1. Methods and Techniques of Workplace Training 

and Development Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis on the methods and techniques common to exemplary training pro- 
grams. Designing learning programs and selecting appropriate media methods and 
resources using sound theoretical framework is the goal. Evaluation of programs 
and instruction is discussed. 

TECH-672. Curriculum Development Using Microcomputers 

in Industrial Education Credit 3(3-0) 

The focus will be on theory, principles, and concepts of curriculum development as 
it applies to computers. This course is designed to provide the student with an 
opportunity to apply the curriculum development concepts to the computer model. 



181 



TECH-682. Microcomputer Systems for Industrial 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

The student is introduced to files, diskettes, drives and devices that relate to the 
microcomputer. Built in and transient utility demands are covered. The MS DOS 
and Unix systems are introduced with applications to school and research. 

TECH-715. Advanced Comprehensive Shop Practices Credit 3(2-2) 

Problems involving wood, electricity-electronics, graphic arts, metal and crafts; 
emphasis on organization, instructional materials, and procedures. 

TECH-717. Industrial Education Problems I Credit 3(2-2) 

An advanced study in modern technology, may deal with recent developments, 
trends, practices and procedures of manufacturing and construction industries. 
Individual and group research and experimentation, involving selection, design, 
development and evaluation of technical reports and instructional materials for 
application in Industrial Education program. Prerequisite: I.E. 510 or 715. 

TECH-718. Industrial Education Problems II Credit 3(2-2) 

A continuation of I.E. 717. 

TECH-719. Advanced Furniture Design and Construction Credit 3(2-2) 

Laws, theories and principles of aesthetic and structural design, planning, design- 
ing, pictoral sketching and furniture drawing. Laboratory work involving setting 
up, operating, and maintaining furniture production equipment, plus forms, requi- 
sitions, orders, invoices, stock, bills, buying and professional problems. Prerequisite: 
Permission from the instructor. 

TECH-731. Advanced Drafting Techniques Credit 3(2-2) 

For teachers with undergraduate preparation or trade experience. School of 
techniques, standards, conventions, devices, experimentation in advance of oppor- 
tunities offered in regular courses. Use of literature and research expected. 

TECH-762. Evaluation of Vocational Education Program Credit 3(3-0) 

Standards, criteria, and strategies for evaluating vocational education curricula, 
facilities, and personnel; emphasis on designing and conducting program evaluation 
activities. For local directors and administrators. 

TECH-763. General Industrial Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the development of local, state, and national levels of day industrial 
schools, evening industrial schools, part-time day and evening schools. Their organi- 
zations, types, courses of study, scope of movement; study of special student groups, 
fees and charges, building and equipment. 

TECH-764. Supervision and Administration of Industrial 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the relation of industrial education to the general curriculum and the 
administration responsibilities involved. Courses of study, relative costs, coordina- 
tion problems, class and shop organization, and the development of an effective 
program of supervision will be emphasized. 

TECH-765. Evaluation of Training in Industrial Settings Credit 3(3-0) 

Study and application of principles of evaluation in industrial training settings. 
Emphasis is placed on test construction, measurement techniques, and evaluation 
results. 

TECH-766. Curriculum Laboratories in Industrial Settings Credit 3(3-0) 

Development and preparation of instructional materials for industrial classroom 
use. Students select and develop significant areas of instruction for use in industrial 
settings. Modularized instruction that relates to industrial settings is studied for use 
and application in the private sector of business and industry. Opportunities are 
provided for review of actual industrial training materials. 

182 



TECH-767. Research and Literature in Industrial Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Research techniques applied to technical and educational papers and thesis classi- 
fication of research, selection, delineation and planning; collection, organization and 
interpretation of data; survey of industrial education literature. 

TECH-768. Industrial Education Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

Design to enable non-thesis graduate majors to complete educational and technical 
investigations. Each student will be expected to plan and complete a research paper 
and present a summary of his findings to the seminar. 

TECH-769. Thesis Research in Industrial Education Credit 3 



Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

PHED-651. Personal, School and Community Health Credit 3(3-0) 

Problems 

This course is designed to examine and assess personal, school and community 
health problems. Emphasis is placed on the development of a personal health profile, 
contemporary health issues affecting students in grades K-12 and the examination of 
community agencies. The course includes campus based and field experiences. 

PHED-652. Methods and Materials in Health Education for Elementary 

and Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the fundamentals of the school health program, pupil needs, methods, 
planning instruction, teaching techniques, and selection and evaluation of materials 
for the elementary and secondary programs, and the use of the community resources. 

PHED-679. Evaluation of Motor Dysfunction Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is designed to study the various methods of assessing and evaluating 
motor dysfunctions. Emphasis is placed on neurological bases of human perfor- 
mance, developmental and process disorders. A field observation is required. 

PHED-721. Current Problems and Trends in Credit 3(3-0) 

Physical Education 

This course is designed for experienced teachers to address problems in teaching 
and coaching on all educational levels. Trends and the future direction of the profes- 
sion will be addressed through research and class discussion. 

PHED-722. Current Theories and Principles of Teaching 

Physical Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce contemporary methods of instruction for all 
levels of physical education. Emphasis will be placed on innovative techniques and 
interdisciplinary interaction. 

PHED-723. Supervision in Health and Physical Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an in-depth study of management theories and policies applicable to 
the administration of Health and Physical Education classes at all levels elementary 
through higher education. The planning, implementing and evaluating of classroom 
activities are emphasized. 

PHED-731. Exercise Physiology Credit 3(2-1) 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the application of 
principles and theories of physiology as it applies to the physical training and 
conditioning of athletes for sports participation. 

PHED-732. Sport Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of current and classical theories of sport psychology as 

183 



applied to human performance. Emphasis is placed upon motivation, attention, 
anxiety, human factors and cognitively based psychological skills training pro- 
grams. 

PHED-733. Motor Learning and Control Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of current theories and principles of human motor behav- 
ior as applied to the acquisition and analysis of motor skills. Emphasis will be placed 
upon learning concepts, practice, arousal, methodology, transfer and distribution. 

PHED-741. Administration in Recreation and Intramurals Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of management theories and policies applicable to recreation 
and intramural programs. Organization and administration in the areas of plan- 
ning, funding, scheduling and officiating of sports are emphasized for all popu- 
lations. 

PHED-742. Administration of Interscholastic and Intercollegiate 

Athletics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide management theories and principles for the 
organization and administration of interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics. The 
components of budgeting, scheduling, staffing, coordination, planning and legal 
liability will be thoroughly discussed. 

PHED-760. Program Development in Adapted Physical 

Education Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is defined to study the development of appropriate Physical Education 
Programs for individuals with disabilities residing in rural areas. Emphasis is 
placed upon strategies for effective programming, in-service training, alternative 
resources and working with support agencies. A practicum in a recreational setting 
is required. 

PHED-761. Methods and Curricula in Adapted Physical 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to study various curricula for implementation in adapted 
physical education in various environmental settings, including the rural areas. 
Hands on experience with computers is included in the coursework. 

PHED-762. The Teaching of Adapted Physical Education Credit 3(1-4) 

This course is designed to apply the knowledge acquired from various disciplines 
through student teaching in public school systems including rural schools. A twelve 
week program is designed for students to have an intensive experience with students 
with disabilities, teachers, administrators, support agencies, and parents. 

PHED-784. Research Statistics for Physical Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to give the student a sound foundation in the principles and 
applications of various statistical methods as they relate to conducting and evaluat- 
ing research in Physical Education. The course includes descriptive statistics, prob- 
ability theory, sampling distribution, inferences about means and standard devia- 
tions, hypothesis testing, regression, correlation, Chi-square and non-parametric 
methods. 

PHED-785. Research Methods in Physical Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to study various research methods, research designs, and 
models utilized in the study of Health and Physical Education. Quantitative and 
qualitative analysis of current research will be emphasized. 

PHED-786. Scientific Foundations of Physical Education Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to discuss scientific approaches to Physical Education and 
methods of applying these scientific investigations to the classroom. 

PHED-798. Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the students with a culminating experience by 
writing a research paper and presenting it in a forum of students and faculty. The 

184 



forum will also provide an environment for discussion, presentation and interaction 
between students and faculty. 

PHED-799. Thesis Credit 3(0-4) 



Department of History 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

HIST-600. The British Colonies and the American 

Revolution Credit 3(3-0) 

The planting and maturation of the English colonies of North American. Relation- 
ships between Europeans, Indians, and transplanted Africans, constitutional devel- 
opment, religious ferment, and the colonial economy are studied. 

HIST-603. Civil War and Reconstruction Credit 3(3-0) 

Causes as well as constitutional and diplomatic aspects of the Civil War, the role of 
the Afro- American in slavery, in war, and in freedom; and the socio-economic and 
political aspects of Congressional Reconstruction and the emergence of the New 
South are studied. 

HIST-605. Seminar on the Soviet Union Credit 3(3-0) 

A seminar course on the Soviet Union including extensive reading and discussion 
and a major research paper. 

HIST-606. U.S. History, 1900-1932 Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasizes political, economic, social, cultural and diplomatic developments 
from 1900 to 1932 with special attention to their effect upon the people of the United 
States and their influence on the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs. 

HIST-607. U.S. Since 1932-Present Credit 3(3-0) 

With special emphasis on the Great Depression, New Deal, the Great Society, and 
the expanding role of the United States as a world power, World War II, Cold War, 
Korean and Vietnam conflicts are studied. Major themes include the origin, consoli- 
dation, and expansion of the New Deal, the growth of executive power, the origins 
and spread of the Cold war, civil liberties, and civil rights, and challenges for the 
extension of political and economic equality and the protection of the environ- 
ment. 

HIST-610. Seminar in the History of Twentieth Century 

Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

A reading, research, and discussion course which investigates the development 
and, especially, the impact of major Twentieth century technologies. Attention will 
also be given to the process of invention, the relationship between science and 
technology, and the ethical problems associated with some contemporary tech- 
nologies. 

HIST-615. Seminar in the History of Black America Credit 3(3-0) 

A reading, research, and discussion course which concentrates attention on var- 
ious aspects of the life and history of Afro-Americans. Emphasis is placed on histori- 
ography and major themes which include nationalism, black leadership and ideolo- 
gies, and economic development. 

HIST-616. Seminar in African History Credit 3(3-0) 

Research, writing and discussion on selected topics in African history. 

HIST-617. Readings in African History Credit 3(3-0) 

By arrangement with instructor. 

HIST-620. Seminar in Asian History Credit 3(3-0) 

Research, writing, and selected topics in Asian history. 

185 



HIST-625. Seminar in Historiography and Historical Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of the writing of history as well as training in research methodology and 
communication, including basic computer and quantification skills. 

HIST-626. Revolutions in the Modern World Credit 3(3-0) 

A seminar course stressing comparative analysis of revolutions and revolutionary 
movements in the United States, France, Russia, China, Cuba, and Iran. Students 
will also evaluate theories of revolution in light of historical examples. 

HIST-630. Studies in European History, 1815-1914 Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive study of selected topics in Nineteenth Century European history. 

HIST-631. Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, 

1914-Present Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive study of selected topics including World Wars I and II, the Russian 
Revolution, Hitler and the Holocaust, the Depression, the threat of nuclear war, the 
Welfare State, and the Solidarity movement in Poland. 

HIST-633. Independent Study in History Credit 3(3-0) 

By arrangement with instructor. 
POLI-645 American Foreign Policy— 1945-Present* Credit 3(3-0) 

Examination of forces and policies that have emerged from Potsdam, Yalta, and 
World War II. Emphasis will be on understanding the policies that were formulated, 
why they were formulated, the consequences of their formulation, and the alterna- 
tive policies that may have come about. Prerequisite: Survey course in American 
history, American Diplomatic history or consent of instructor. 



Graduate 

HIST-701. Recent United States Diplomatic History Credit 3(3-0) 

Episodes in the history of American foreign relations that were especially impor- 
tant in influencing persistent patterns of this nation's role in international relations. 
Possible examples studied: Pearl Harbor, the Cold War, Korean War, Cuban missile 
crisis, Vietnam, nuclear arms limitation, and black Africa. 

HIST-712. The Black American in the Twentieth Century Credit 3(3-0) 

Research, reading, discussion, and an analysis of major facets of black life in the 
United States from 1900 to the present. Requires a major research paper. 

HIST-730. Seminar in History Credit 3(3-0) 

Topics to be selected by students and instructor. Includes a major research project. 
POLI-730. Constitutional Development Since 1865* Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical study of the development of the Constitution since 1865. Treatment will 
be given to important Constitutional decisions, major documents, major Supreme 
Court decisions, and public policy. Assignments in paperback books will be frequent. 

HIST-740. History, Social Science, and Contemporary 

World Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Readings, discussions, and reports on the relationships between history and the 
social sciences as a whole, as well as their combined roles in dealing with contempor- 
ary world problems. 

HIST-750. Thesis in History Credit 3(3-0) 

Thesis work will be done with the appropriate instructor in accordance with field 
of interest. 



186 



CUIN-725. Problems and Trends in Teaching the 

Social Sciences** Credit 3(3-0) 

Current strategies, methods, and materials for teaching the social sciences. 
Emphasis on innovations, evaluation and relation to learning. Provision for clinical 
experiences. 

*Political Science 645 and 730 are accepted for history credit. 

Geography 

Undergraduate and Graduate 

HIST-640. Topics in Geography of the United States and 

Canada Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in cultural geography of the United States and Canada are studied 
intensively. Emphasis is placed upon individual reading and research and upon 
group discussion. 

HIST-641. Topics in World Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in geography are studied intensively. Concern is for cultural char- 
acteristics and their interrelationships with each other and with the habitat. 
Emphasis is upon reading, research, and discussion. 

Department of Human Development and Services 

HDSV-435. Educational Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of basic problems underlying the psychology of education, individual 
differences, development of personality, motivation of learning and development, 
nature of learning and procedures which best promotes its efficiency. (Undergradu- 
ate only.) 

HDSV-600. Introduction to Guidance Credit 3(3-0) 

A foundation course of prospective teachers, part-time or full-time counselors who 
plan to do further work in the field of guidance or education. Special consideration 
will be given to the nature, scope, and principles of guidance services. No credit 
toward concentration in guidance. 

HDSV-623. Personality Development Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the basic processes in personality development, the contents of personal- 
ity, and the consequences of personality development. 

HDSV-660. Introduction to Exceptional Children Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 660) 

An overview of the educational needs of exceptional or "different" children in the 
regular classroom situation, emphasis placed on classroom techniques known to be 
most helpful to children having hearing losses, speech disorders, visual problems, 
emotional, social handicaps and intelligence deviation, including slow-learners and 
gifted children. An introduction to the area of special education. Designed for 
classroom teachers. 

HDSV-661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 661) 

An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and development of 
mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, and emotionally and 
socially maladjusted children. 



187 



HDSV-662. Mental Deficiency Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of types and characteristics of mental defectives; classification and 
diagnoses criteria for institutional placement and social control of mental deficiency. 

HDSV-663. Measurement and Evaluation in Special 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 663) 

The selection, administration, and interpretation of individual tests; intensive 
study of problems in testing exceptional and extremely deviant children; considera- 
tion to measurement and evaluation of children who are mentally, physically, and 
emotionally or socially handicapped. Emphasis upon the selection and use of group 
tests of intelligence and the interpretation of their results. 

HDSV-664. Materials, Methods and Problems in Teaching 

Mentally Retarded Children Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 664) 

Basic organization of programs for the education of the mentally retarded; classi- 
fication and testing of mental defectives; curriculum development and principles of 
teaching intellectually slow children. Attention is also given to the provision of 
opportunities for observing and working with children who have been classified as 
mentally retarded. 

HDSV-665. Practicum in Special Education Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Elementary Education and Reading 665) 

Observation, participation, and teaching in an educational program for the men- 
tally retarded. 

HDSV-706. Organization and Administration of Guidance 

Services Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of methods by which guidance policies and services may be properly 
implemented through organizational framework; consequently, leads to more effec- 
tive organization of current guidance programs. Prerequisite: HDSV 600. 

HDSV-707. Research Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

Critical discussions of research projects in progress and of the related literature to 
such projects. An acceptable written report is required. The course recommended 
for guidance majors in the degree program and others seeking the School Counselor's 
certificate. Prerequisite: Guidance 730, prior or concurrent. 

HDSV-715. Measurement for Guidance Credit 3(2-2) 

The development and understandings and skills in collecting and interpreting 
data concerning the individual, and the use of such data in case studies and follow-up 
procedures. 

HDSV-716. Techniques of Individual Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of educational and vocational testing with reference to a general frame- 
work for using statistical information in several types of counseling problems. 
Statistics necessary for the evaluation of psychological and educational measure- 
ment will be considered. This course also includes the measurement of aptitude, 
including special aptitude, with reference to prediction of proficiency in various 
occupations and curricula. Prerequisite: CUIN 436 or SOCI 302 or an equivalent. 

HDSV-717. Educational and Occupational Information Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of vocational theories of career development, career counseling, basic 
resources available in the area of occupational, educational, personal and social 
information, and their application to Guidance and Counseling. Prerequisites: 
HDSV 600 and 706. 

HDSV-718. Introduction to Counseling Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed as an introduction to skill development which is essential to effective 
counseling. Emphasis is upon characteristics of the counseling relationship and their 

188 



effect upon counseling process. Learning activities such as role playing, audio taping 
and video taping, and practice interview will be utilized, to help make theoretical 
constructs concrete and practical. Prerequisite: HDSV 623. 

HDSV-719. Case Studies in Counseling Credit 2(1-2) 

The development of a basic understanding of the case study technique as used in 
counseling. Compilation, analysis, diagnosis, and treatment of theoretical and actual 
counseling case histories. 

HDSV-720. Theories of Counseling Credit 3 

A critical analysis of class and contemporary theories of counseling, the nature, 
rationale, development, research and use of theories in counseling. Major points of 
view include the psychodynamic rationale, cognitive, behavioral and existenial 
humanistics are studied and compared. Prerequisites: HDSV 623, 718. 

HDSV-721. Independent Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

Offerings in this area are intended to allow a student in any of our degree programs 
to demonstrate how well he/she can learn, working alone but under faculty supervi- 
sion. A student(s) will conduct independent research on a specific topic or a deli- 
neated area in Educational Psychology or Counseling. Prerequisite: Departmental 
approval. 

HDSV-722. Career Education and Vocational Development 

Theories Credit 3(3-0) 

What career education is and how to implement it along with the study of career 
development theories, review of vocational development research, application of 
theoretical propositions to counseling cases, and writing a proposal to investigate 
career development concepts, will be the major units. 

HDSV-723. Student Personnel Services in Postsecondary 

Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and practice in counseling problems of the student personnel staff and 
other supporting services in the postsecondary setting. An in-depth study of student 
personnel services such as admissions, orientation, educational advising, student 
programs, health services, living accommodations, financial aid career counseling 
and placement will be included. 

HDSV-724. Advanced Counseling Theories, Strategies and 

Techniques Credit 3(3-0) 

An advanced graduate course designed to offer a thorough in-depth examination 
of the theoretical basis and research evidence for several specific behavior change 
techniques. Particular attention will be given to application of selected modes of 
counseling and application of learning models in counseling procedures. It will 
provide an opportunity for students to further synthesize their own "personal theory" 
of counseling. 

HDSV-725. Human Resource Internship Credit 3-5(9-15) 

An Internship involving an extended period of continuous time experience. Must 
be completed by each student participating in the Human Resource Concentration. 
The Internship should be a learning experience, a work experience and an on-the-job 
training thus, one who completes the Internship, will be more knowledgable in the 
field of Human Resource Counseling. Each student will receive a copy of the job 
description outlining the duties to be performed in the agency. Students who are 
placed will intern as Human Resource Administrators, Human Resource Planners, 
or Human Resource Program Evaluators for a semester during the year. Students 
are responsible for preregistering for the human Resource Internship one semester 
prior to the actual placement with department approval required. Prerequisite: 
Professional Core. 

HDSV-726. Educational Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of applications of psychological principles to educational practices. 

189 



HDSV-727. Child Growth and Development Credit 3(3-0) 

A comprehensive analysis of physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and 
development from birth through adolescence. 

HDSV-728. Measurement and Evaluation Credit 3(2-2) 

A consideration of measurement techniques and interpretation of group tests and 
individual pupil diagnostic tests. 

HDSV-729. Mental Hygiene for Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the functions of mental hygiene in the total educative process. 
Attention is given to the basic principles of mental health as these apply to pupils and 
teachers alike, to the types of adjustment, to the development of personality, and to 
psychotherapeutic techniques for the restoration of mental health. Prerequisite: 
Human Development and Services 726. 

HDSV-730. Practicum Credit 3(1-4) 

Designed to provide practical work in the student's area of specialization. Real life 
experiences are provided in a laboratory setting so that the student may put into 
practice the knowledge and behaviors gained during previous studies. In addition, a 
supervised professional experience is required in a setting appropriate to the stu- 
dent's vocational objectives. Learning activities include making and viewing video 
taped counseling sessions, practice interviews and actual counseling situations. 
Students are responsible for preregistering for the field placement, one semester 
prior to the actual placement, with departmental approved required. Prerequisites: 
HDSV 600, 623, 706, 718, 720, and 731. 

HDSV-731. Group Practicum Credit 3 

The course will emphasize the practical use of group techniques, and focus on 
facilitating the group process. The objectives will be to give students maximum 
practice in the group setting, with emphasis on both the group activities in guidance 
work in counseling, with special emphasis on the therapeutic forces for behavior 
change with the group process. Prerequisites: HDSV 600, 623, 718 and 720. 

HDSV-733. Cross Cultural Perspective Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to help participants develop attitudes, knowledge and 
skills for more effective work with culturally different individuals and groups. 
Substantial attention will be given to interpersonal issues, concerns related to differ- 
ent cultures, mainly, African-American, Asian-American, Hispanics-American and 
Native- American. Prerequisites: HDSV 623, 718, and 720. 

HDSV-734. Counseling Special Populations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to aid students in developing understandings of various 
psychological needs of special populations and directs specific approaches in 
addressing treatment. Special populations will involve the elderly, women, the 
handicapped and other selected populations. Prerequisites: HDSV 623, 718 and 720. 



Department of Human Environment and Family Sciences 
Food and Nutrition 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

HEFS-630. Advanced Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Intermediate metabolism and interrelationships of organic and inorganic food 
nutrients in human biochemical functions. Prerequisites: HEFS 337 and CHEM 
251, 252 or equivalent. 

HEFS-631. Food Chemistry Credit 3(2-2) 

An introduction to the biochemistry of foods with emphasis on the basic composi- 
tion, structure, properties and nutritive value of food. The chemistry of changes 
190 



occurring during processing and utilization of foods will also be studied. Prerequi- 
sites: HEFS 236, CHEM 102, 221. 

HEFS-632. Food and Nutrition in Early Childhood Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the elementary principles of nutrition and their influence on the growth 
and development of children. Special consideration is given to nutrition education 
techniques to be used with children and parents in preschool centers and elementary 
schools. 

HEFS-633. Food Analysis Credit 3(1-4) 

Fundamental chemical, physical and sensory aspects of food composition as they 
related to physical properties, acceptability and nutritional values of foods. Prereq- 
uisites: CHEM 102, 112; HEFS 236. 

HEFS-635. Introduction to Research Methods in Food and 

Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory experiences in the use of methods applicable to food and nutrition 
research. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

HEFS-636. Food Promotion Credit 4(1-6) 

A course which gives experiences in the development and testing of recipes. 
Opportunities will be provided for demonstrations, writing and photography with 
selected business. 

HEFS-637. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

Independent study and/or experiences in food and/or nutrition. Prerequisite: 
Admission by instructor. 

HEFS-638. Sensory Evaluation Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the color, flavor, aroma and texture of foods by the use of sensory 
evaluation methods. Prerequisites: HEFS 236, HEFS 337. 

HEFS-640. Geriatric Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Multidisciplinary approaches to geriatric foods, nutrition and health problems. 
Evaluation of nutritional status and nutrition care of the elderly are emphasized. 
Field experience: nursing home and other community agencies. Prerequisite: HEFS 
337 or 439. 

HEFS-641. Current Trends in Food Science Credit 3(3-0) 

Recent developments in food science and their implications for food scientists, 
nutritionists, dietitians and other professionals in the food industry and related 
professions. 

HEFS-643. Food Preservation Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of current methods of preserving foods— canning, freezing, dehydration, 
radiation, and fermentation. Prerequisite: HEFS 236 or equivalent. 

HEFS-645. Special Problems in Food Administration Credit 2(0-4) 

Individual work on special problems in food administration. 
HEFS-648. Community Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Materials, methods, and goals in planning, organizing and conducting nutritional 
status surveys. Evaluation of foods and nutrition programs at state and federal 
levels. Prerequisites: MATH 224 or SOCI 303; HEFS 337 or equivalent. 

HEFS-650. International Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

An ecological approach to the hunger and malnutrition in technologically deve- 
loped and developing countries. Focus on intergrated intervention programs, pro- 
jects, and problems. Opportunities to participate in national and international 
internships through cooperative arrangements. 



191 



HEFS-679. Nutrition Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Philosophy, principles, methods and materials involved in nutrition education. 
Application of nutrition knowledge and skills in the development of the nutrition 
education curriculum and programs in schools and communities. 



Graduate 

HEFS-730. Nutrition in Health and Disease Credit 3(3-1) 

Significance of nutrition in health and disease. Consideration of: (1) the methods of 
appraisal of human nutritional status to include clinical, dietary, biochemical, and 
anthropometric techniques; (2) various biochemical parameters used to diagnose 
and treat disorders; and (3) the role of diet as a therapeutic tool. Prerequisite: HEFS 
630 or equivalent. 

HEFS-733. Nutrition During the Growth and Development Credit 3(2-2) 

Nutritional, genetical and environmental influences on human growth and devel- 
opment. Prerequisite: HEFS 630 or equivalent. 

HEFS-734. Nutrition Education Credit 3(2-2) 

Interpretation of the results of nutrition research for use with lay groups. Prepara- 
tion of teaching materials based on research for use in nutrition education programs. 

HEFS-735. Experimental Foods Credit 3(2-2) 

Objective and subjective evaluation of food; development and testing of recipes; 
experimentation with food. Prerequisite: HEFS 236 or equivalent. 

HEFS-736. Research Methods in Food and Nutrition Credit 4(2-6) 

Experimental procedures in food and nutrition research; care of experimental 
animals; analysis of food, body fluids, animal tissues. Prerequisites: Analytical 
Chemistry and Biochemistry. 

HEFS-739. Thesis Research Credit 3(0-6) 

Research problems in food or nutrition. 

HEFS-740. Community Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Individualized work, team teaching or guest speakers. Application of the princi- 
ples of nutrition to various community nutrition problems of specific groups (geriat- 
rics, preschoolers, adolescents and expectant mothers). Evaluation of nutrition pro- 
grams of public health and social welfare agencies at local, state, federal and 
international levels. 

HEFS-742. Cultural and Social Aspects of Food and 

Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Sociological, psychological, and economical background of ethnic groups and their 
influence on food consumption patterns, and nutritional status. 

HEFS-744. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Credit 2(2-0) 

Required of all graduates in Food and Nutrition. 

HEFS-745. Practicum in Food or Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

Field experiences with private or public agencies. 



192 



Department of Manufacturing Systems 
Master of Science in Industrial Technology 

MFG-610. Problem Solving in Manufacturing Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course teaches fundamentals of problem solving as they are applied to a 
MFGfacturing technology environment. Included are analytical as well as creative 
problem solving techniques. It also explores contemporary issues of innovation in the 
work place. 

MFG-696. Applied Computer Integrated Manufacturing 

(CIM) Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of computer integrated 
MFGfacturing (CIM). It will provide hands-on experience using sensoring devices 
necessary to control a CIM system. Prerequisite: MFG-674. 

MFG-699. Independent Study in Manufacturing Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

The student selects a problem, either management or technical in nature, in 
consultation with a faculty member in this area of interest. This problem may be 
research or application oriented in nature. A standard report format will be 
required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MFG-700. Concepts in World Class Manufacturing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will provide instruction in the concept of 'World Class Manufacturing.' 
This includes topics such as Just-in-Time (JIT), Total Quality Control (TQC), human 
resource management, quick change-over, small batch sizes, automation, and time 
based competitive advantage. 

MFG-710. Manufacturing Materials Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the materials which are commonly used to MFGfacture pro- 
ducts. It explores the way these materials are formed. Covered are traditional metals 
and plastics as well as emerging high tech materials. The practical applications of 
these materials are emphasized. Prerequisite: MFG-471 or equivalent. 

MFG-715. Tool Technology Credit 3(2-1) 

Includes coverage of tool layout, tool material, tool wear and failure, work holding 
principles, jig and die, specifications for press working, blanking, bending, forming, 
drawing, and forging, etc. Tooling for joining processes such as welding, soldering, 
brazing, mechanical joining, and adhesive bonding are covered, as well as the use of 
computers in tooling. Prerequisite: MFG-472 or equivalent. 

MFG-735. Manufacturing Organization and Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys contemporary Manufacturing organization and management 
issues. Focusing on Manufacturing aspects of the product cycle, it addresses issues 
such as research and development, product design, marketing, and sales and distri- 
bution. This course explores new trends in Manufacturing technology management 
and quality of work life issues. Prerequisite: MFG-700. 

MFG-740. Leadership Development Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an experiential seminar designed for assessment of the individual's 
managerial strengths and weaknesses in a manufacturing management position. 
Current and evolving leadership issues will be discussed and leadership models will 
be presented. Managerial and leadership issues in high participation work places 
will be stressed. Students will participate in behavioral simulations and receive 
psychometric feedback. Prerequisite: MFG-735. 

MFG-745. Managing New Product Development Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the product development cycle and emphasizes the benefits of 
Early Manufacturing Involvement (EMI) and Logistics Processes. Use of cross- 
functional teams in product development is also explored. Prerequisite: MFG-735. 



193 



MFG-750. Manufacturing Co-op Credit 6 

The co-op experience is designed to provide students with an intern experience of 
working full-time in a manufacturing environment. For 6 hours of credit, the stu- 
dent must be employed full-time for one semester. Evaluation of the student will be 
based on reports from the student's work supervisor and the co-op coordinator. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours graduate credit. 

MFG-755. Production Management and Control Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focus is on production scheduling, work flow, and inventory flow, 
Just-in-time (JIT), and Material Resources Planning (MRP) are explored as tech- 
niques for structuring production as well as inventory management. Traditional 
work design is compared to newer more high participative work designs including 
self-managed teams. Prerequisite: MFG-735. 

MFG-760. Advanced Manufacturing Process/Computer Numerical 

Control (CNC) Credit 3(1-2) 

This course explores applications in advanced Computer Numerically Controlled 
(CNC) machine tool technology with precision work performed on lathes, mill, 
Electrostatic Discharge Machining (EDM), and surface drilling work stations. Pre- 
requisite: MFG-472. 

MFG-770. Managing a Total Quality System Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of total quality control systems to reduce defects, lower cost, and 
increase productivity in a manufacturing environment. Study includes implement- 
ing quality through Statistical Process Control (SPC), managing quality, quality 
information systems, quality circles, and quality of work-life concepts. Prerequisite: 
MFG-495 or equivalent. 

MFG-780. Reliability Testing and Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of Metrology and reliability testing at various stages of manufacturing 
processes for zero failures. Includes destructive and non-destructive testing proce- 
dures, failure analysis, exponential and Weibull Failure Law, and reliability predic- 
tion of components and/or systems. 

MFG-790. Master's Project Credit 3(3-0) 

The master's project is designed to be a culminating experience for the master's 
degree. It is applications oriented and focuses on an actual project from a manufac- 
turing environment. It is designed to integrate the learning from the courses taken in 
the degree program. Prerequisites: 24 hours of graduate credit and consent of 
instructor. 

MFG-799. Special Topics in Manufacturing Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will allow a group of students to work on special topics of interest 
which are not covered by an existing course. These are emerging themes which 
reflect the rapidly changing nature of 'World Class Manufacturing' environments. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



Department of Mathematics 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

MATH-600. Introduction to Modern Mathematics for 

Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

Elementary theory of sets, elementary logic and propositional systems, nature and 
methods of mathematical proofs, structure of the real number system. Open only to 
in-service teachers or to others having the permission of the Department of 
Mathematics. 



194 



MATH-601. Algebraic Equations for Secondary School 

Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

Algebra of sets, algebraic equations, systems of equations, matrices and determi- 
nants with applications, and the elements of vector spaces. Prerequisite: Mathemat- 
ics 600 or consent of the Department of Mathematics. 

MATH-602. Modern Algebra for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

Sets and mappings, properties of binary operations, groups, rings, integral 
domains, vector spaces and fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics consent of the 
Department of Mathematics 600 or consent of the Department of Mathematics. 

MATH-603. Introduction to Real Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

The following topics will be covered in this course: elementary set theory, func- 
tions, axiomatic development of the real numbers, metric spaces, convergent 
sequences, completeness, compactness, connectedness, continuity, limits, sequences 
of functions, differentiation, the mean value theorem, Taylor's theorem, Riemann 
integration, infinite series, the fixed point theorem, partial differentiation, and the 
implicit function theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 311 or consent of the instructor. 

MATH-604. Modern Geometry for Secondary School 

Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

Re-examination of Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and the Hilbert axi- 
oms, introduction to projective geometry and other non-Euclidean geometries. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 600 or consent of the Department of Mathematics. 

MATH-606. Mathematics for Chemists Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of those principles of mathematics which are involved in chemical compu- 
tations and derivations from general chemistry through physical chemistry; topics 
covered include significant figures, methods of expressing large and small numbers, 
algebraic operations, trigonometric functions and an introduction to calculus. 

MATH-607. Theory of Numbers Credit 3(3-0) 

Divisibility properties of the integers, the Euclidean algorithm, congruences, 
diophantine equations, number-theoretic functions and continued fractions. Pre- 
requisite: Twenty hours of college mathematics. 

MATH-608. Methods of Applied Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the SAS programming language, and uses it in the analysis 
of variance, both single and multi-factor. It includes various methods of hypothesis 
testing and constructing confidence intervals. The course covers simple and multiple 
linear regression, including model building and variable selection techniques. Ele- 
ments of time series and categorical data analysis are covered. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 224. 

MATH-610. Complex Variables I Credit 3(3-0) 

The following topics will be covered in this course: complex number system, limits 
of complex sequences, complex functions, continuity, limits of functions, derivatives, 
elementary functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, antiderivatives harmonic func- 
tions, inverse functions, power series, analytic functions, analytic continuation, con- 
tour integrals, Cauchy's theorem and Cauchy's integral formula. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 231. 

MATH-611. Complex Variables II Credit 3(3-0) 

Mathematics 61 1 is a continuation of Mathematics 610. The following topics will be 
covered in this course: Liouville's theorem, the fundamental theorem of algebra, the 
winding number, generalized Cauchy theorems, singularities, residue calculus, 
Laurent series, boundary value problems, harmonic functions, conformal mappings, 
Poisson's formula, potential theory, physical applications and the Riemann mapping 
theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 610. 



195 



MATH-612. Advanced Linear Algebra Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices determi- 
nants and systems of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonaliza- 
tion, inner products, bilinear quadratic forms, canonical forms, and application to 
engineering and applied sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 350 or consent of the 
instructor. 

MATH-620. Elements of Set Theory and Topology Credit 3(3-0) 

Operations on sets, indexed families of sets, products of sets, relations, functions, 
metric spaces, general topological spaces, continuity, compactness and connected- 
ness. Prerequisites: Mathematics 231 and consent of the instructor. 

MATH-623. Probability Theory and Applications Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with an introduction to sample spaces and probability, includ- 
ing combinatorices. It covers continuous and discrete random variables, including 
multivariate, random variables and expectations; also marginal and conditional 
distributions are derived. The course introduces moment generating functions, and 
covers the central limit theorem and its applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 231. 

MATH-624. Theory and Methods of Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces methods of statistical estimation and inference including 
the following topics: sufficient statistics, confidence sets, hypothesis tests, and maxi- 
mum likelihood methods. The theory of uniformly most powerful tests and the 
Neyman-Pearson Lemma are covered. Other topics include least squares estimation, 
the linear model, and Bayesian methods. Prerequisite: Mathematics 623. 

MATH-625. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, 1 Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed for in-service and prospective teachers who have as their goal "to teach 
the basic skills and competencies of mathematics sought in today's world." The 
course emphasizes that the teacher, first, must have the knowledge and skills in 
order to accomplish this goal. It stresses fundamentals of arithmetic, sets and opera- 
tions, number systems, fractions, decimals, percents, estimation, consumer arith- 
metic, problem solving and traditional and metric geometry and measurement. This 
course may not be used for degree credit. 

MATH-626. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, II Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 3686) 

A continuation of Mathematics 625. No credit towards a degree in mathematics; 
not open to secondary school teachers of mathematics. Credit on elementary educa- 
tion degree. Prerequisites: Mathematics 625. 

MATH-631. Linear and Non-Linear Programming Credit 3(3-0) 

Optimization subject to linear constraints; transportation problems; simplex 
method, network flows, applications of linear programming to industrial problems 
and economic theory. Introduction to non-linear programming. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 350 and consent of the instructor. 

MATH-632. Games and Queue Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

General introduction to game theory; two-person-non-zero-sum-non-cooperative 
games; two-person cooperative games; reasonable outcomes and values; the minimax 
theorem. Introduction to queuing theory; single server queuing processes; many 
serve queuing processes; applications to economics and business. Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 224, Mathematics 350, or consent of the instructor. 

MATH-633. Stochastic Processes Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with a review of Probability and Random Variables. Markov 
Processes, Poisson Processes, Waiting Times, Renewal Phenomena, Branching Pro- 
cesses, Queuing System, Service Times are covered. Prerequisite: Mathematics 623 
or consent of the instructor. 



196 



MATH-650. Ordinary Differential Equations Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an intermediate course in ordinary differential equations with emphasis on 
applications. Topics include linear systems and various phase plane techniques for 
non-linear ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 331. 

MATH-651. Partial Differential Equations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes introduction to complex variables and residue calculus, 
transform calculus, higher order partical differential equations governing various 
physical phenomena, non-homogeneous boundary value problems, orthogonal ex- 
pressions, Green's functions and variational principles. Prerequisites: Mathematics 
331, 332. 

MATH-652. Methods of Applied Mathematics II Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to integral equations and conversion of differential problems into 
integral equations of Volterra and Fredholm types, solution by iteration and other 
methods, existence theory, eigenvalue problems, Hilbert-Schmidt theory of sym- 
metric kernels and topics in the calculus of variation, including optimization of 
integrals involving functions of more than one variable, Hamilton's principles, 
Strum-Liouville theory, Rayleigh-Ritz methods, etc. Prerequisite: Mathematics 331. 

MATH-691. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

Topics are selected from differential equations, numerical methods, operations 
research, applied mechanics and from other fields of applied mathematics. Prereq- 
uisite: Senior or graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 



Graduate 

MATH-700. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-701. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-710. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-711. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-712. Numerical Linear Algebra Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-715. Projective Geometry Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-717. Special Topics in Algebra Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-720. Special Topics in Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-723. Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-725. Graduate Design Project Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-730. Thesis Research in Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-731. Advanced Numerical Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-751. Solution Methods in Integral Equations Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-752. Calculus of Variations and Control Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

MATH-765. Optimization Theory and Applications Credit 3(3-0) 



197 



Department of Music 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

MUSI-609. Music in Early Childhood Credit 3(2-2) 

A conceptual approach to the understanding of musical elements; and understand- 
ing of the basic activities in music in early childhood; modern trends in music 
education; Kodaly and Orff methods. 

MUSI-610. Music in Elementary School Today Credit 3(2-2) 

Music in the elementary school curriculum; creating a musical environment in the 
classroom; child voice in singing, selection and presentation of rote songs; develop- 
ment of rhythmic and melodic expressions; directed listening; experimentation with 
percussion and simple melodic instruments; criteria for utilization of notational 
elements; analysis of instrumental materials. 

MUSI-611. Music in the Secondary School Today Credit 3(3-0) 

Techniques of vocal and instrumental music instruction in the junior and senior 
high schools; the general music class; the organization, administration and supervi- 
sion of music programs, as well as music in the humanities. This course includes the 
adolescent's voice and its care; the testing and classification of voices; operetta 
production; the instrumental program; and training glee clubs, choirs, bands, and 
instrumental ensembles. 

MUSI-614. Choral Conducting of School Music Groups Credit 2(0-4) 

Rehearsal techniques; balance, blend and relationship of parts to the total ensem- 
ble; analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in school at all levels 
of ability; conducting experience with laboratory group. 

MUSI-616. Instrumental Conducting of School Music Groups Credit 2(0-4) 

Rehearsal techniques; balance blend and relationship of parts to the total ensem- 
ble; analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in school groups at 
all levels of ability; conducting experience with laboratory groups. 

MUSI-618. Psychology of Music Credit 3(2-2) 

The study of the physical and psychological properties of musical sounds and the 
responses of the human organism to musical stimuli. The principles developed are 
applied to various fields of applied psychology such as the learning of musical skills, 
Therapeutic uses of music, and the use of music in industry to improve production. 

MUSI-620. Advanced Music Appreciation Credit 3(2-2) 

Analytic studies of larger forms from all branches of music writing; Special 
emphasis on style and structural procedures by principal composers; works taken 
from all periods in music history. Designed for students with previous study of music 
appreciation. 

Department of Natural Resources and 
Environmental Design 

Plant and Soil Science 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

AGEN 600. Conservation, Drainage and Irrigation Credit 3(2-2) 

Improvement of soil and water, and study of conservation engineering practices. 
Design of drainage and irrigation systems and water control structures. Prerequi- 
sites: Ag. Engr. 401, Mech. Engr. 416, AGEN 410, and SLSC 632. 



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AGEN 602. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering Credit 3(0-6) 

Design projects in agricultural engineering on problems of special interest to the 
student. Open to seniors in Agricultural Engineering. Prerequisite: Ag. Engr. 600. 

CROS 603. Plant Chemicals Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the important chemical pesticides and growth regulators used in the 
production of economic plants. Prerequisites: Chemistry 102 and Plant Science 300. 

CROS 605. Breeding of Crop Plants Credit 3(2-2) 

Significance of crop improvements in the maintenance of crop yields; application 
of genetic principles and techniques used in the improvement of crops; the place of 
seed certification in the maintenance of varietal purity. 

CROS 606. Special Problems in Crops Credit 3(2-2) 

Designed for students who desire to study special problems in crops. Repeatable 
for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: By consent of instructor. 

CROS 607. Research Design and Analysis Credit 3(2-2) 

Experimental designs, methods and techniques of experimentation; application of 
experimental design to plant and animal research; interpretation of experimental 
data. Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 644, Mathematics 224. 

SLSC 609. Special Problems in Soil Credit 3(3-0) 

Research problems in soils for advanced students. Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. 

EASC 616. Environmental Planning and Natural Resource 

Management Credit 3(2-2) 

Problems of uncontrolled use of natural resources, increased urbanization, 
unplanned growth and general deterioration of the man-made and natural environ- 
ments; basic principles of environmental planning and natural resources manage- 
ment. 

NARS 618. General Forestry and Ecology Credit 3(2-2) 

History, classification, culture, and utilization of native trees, with special empha- 
sis on their importance as a conservation resource and the making of national 
forestry policy, and the ecological impact of trees on environmental quality. Prereq- 
uisite: Botany 140. 

EASC 622. Environmental Sanitation and Waste 

Management Credit 3(2-2) 

Study of traditional and innovative patterns and problems of managing and 
handling waste products of urban and rural environments, their renovation and 
reclamation. 

EASC 624. Earth Science, Geomorphology Credit 3(2-2) 

Various land forms and their evolution— the naturally evolved surface features of 
the Earth's crust and the processes responsible for their evolution, their relation to 
man's activities and as the foundation for understanding the environment. 

EASC 625. Earth Resources Credit 3(2-2) 

Conservation, management and use of renewable and non-renewable resources. 
Their impact on the social and economic quality of our environment. 



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EASC 627. Strategies of Conservation Credit 3(2-2) 

An approach to the teaching of environmental conservation as an integral part of 
the general curriculum. 

EASC 644. Problem Solving in Earth Science Credit 3(2-2) 

Independent field and/or laboratory research in earth and environmental science. 

EASC 666. Earth System Science Credit 3(2-2) 

Study of the earth as a "system." Emphasis will be on the atmosphere, biosphere, 
hydrosphere, and lithosphere interactions in relation to global change that will occur 
in the future in response to human activity. 

EASC 699. Environmental Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Multidisciplinary examination of environmental problems and application of 
appropriate technologies of analysis to the selected problems. 

AGEN 701. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering II Credit 3(3-0) 

Advanced design of drainage and irrigation systems and their applicability to 
specific regions and climatic conditions. In-depth discussion of saturated and un- 
saturated flow and various equations that are used to solve soil water movement. 
Open channel flow in well hydraulics and earth dams or embankments will be 
discussed. Prerequisite: AGEN 600. 

EASC 702. Grass Land Ecology Credit 3(3-0) 

The use of grasses and legumes in a dynamic approach to the theory and practice of 
grass-land agriculture, dealing with the fundamental ecological principles and their 
application to management practices. 

EASC 705. The Physical Universe Credit 3(3-0) 

The course is designed to give the student a broad general background knowledge 
of the earth's physical environment; its lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere 
and their interaction on weather and climate. The physical nature of the star, the sun, 
the planets will also be studied in the light of modern concepts of space. 

EASC 706. Physical Geology Credit 3(3-0) 

The development of the earth's surface, its material composition and forces acting 
upon its surface will be considered. Specific topics include origin of mountains and 
volcanos, causes of earthquakes, work of rivers, wind, wave and glaciers. Prerequi- 
site: Earth Science 705 or consent of instructor. 

EASC 708. Conservation of Natural Resources Credit 3(3-0) 

A descriptive course dealing with conservation and development of renewable 
natural resources encompassing soil, water, and air; cropland, grassland, and 
forests; livestock, fish, and wildlife; and recreational, aesthetic and scenic values. 
Attention will be given to protection and development of the nation's renewable 
natural resources base as an essential part of the national security, defense, and 
welfare. 

EASC 709. Seminar in Earth Science Credit 3(2-0) 

A seminar concerned with recent developments in the earth sciences and related 
disciplines. 

SLSC 710. Soils of North Carolina Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the factors basic to the understanding of the soils of North Carolina, 
their classification, and properties as related to sound landuse and management. 
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Soil Science 338. 



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AGEN 714. Applied Hydrogeology Credit 3(3-0) 

The application of theories to practical problems in hydrology and the measure- 
ment, recording, analysis and reporting of hydrologic data. Design of various water 
control structures and measuring devices. Prerequisites: Hydrology 410, AGEN 
524, AGEN 600. 

SLSC 715. Soil Mineralogy Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of soil minerals with regard to their composition, structure, classification, 
identification, origin, and significance. Special emphasis on primary weatherable 
silicates, layer silicates, and oxide minerals. Prerequisites: Soil Science 534 and 
consent of instructor. 

SLSC 717. Methodology in Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Credit 3(0-6) 

A study of principles involved in the analysis of soils, plants and water. Emphasis 
on basic instrumental and chemical methods for interpretation of soil fertility and 
environment. Instruction in the use of special instruments. Prerequisite: Soil Chem- 
istry 534. 

EASC 718. Applied Environmental Microbiology Credit 3(2-2) 

Discussion of interactions between micro-organisms and their physical environ- 
ment, and significance of micro-organisms in eutrophication, mining spoils, and 
waste treatments. Prerequisites: General Microbiology 121 and consent of 
instructor. 

NARS 720. Graduate Seminar in Plant Science Credit 1(1-0) 

SLSC 721. Soil Microbiology Credit 3(2-2) 

Discussion of major groups of organisms, their description, taxonomy, abundance, 
and their significance and functions. The major role of the microflora in elemental 
cycle and their presence in terms of agronomic and ecological importance. Prerequi- 
sites: Fundamentals of Soil Science 338 and Microbiology 121. 

SLSC 727. Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental and theoretical aspects of soil fertility, productivity and plant nut- 
rients. A discussion of important research data on soil fertility and plant nutrition. 
Prerequisites: Soil Science 517 and consent of instructor. 

SLSC 734. Advanced Soil Chemistry Credit 4(3-2) 

This course is an in-depth discussion of soil chemical interaction in terms of ion 
exchange, solution equilibria, solubility patterns and also electrochemistry; com- 
prehensive coverage of the chemistry of contaminant interactions with soil, its 
retention, movement and the environmental impact; review of relevant advances in 
soil chemistry in the past and recent times. Prerequisite: SLSC 534 or equivalent. 

NARS 777. Special Problems in Plant Science Credit 3(3-0) 

Graduate Studies 



Landscape Architecture 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

LDAR-601. Environmental Perception and 

Design Determinants Credit 3(3-0) 

Comprehensive perception of natural forces as design determinants. An assess- 
ment of systems and methods of perception, classification, analysis and synthesis of 
natural forces and elements as they affect physical design and human use. Lecture 
and workshops will emphasize perception and landscape design. 

LDAR-602. Qualitative Analysis in 

Landscape Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

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Evolution and trends of applied physical design in landscape planning. Investiga- 
tion of actual hypothetical design situations; study of visual and cultural values of 
landscape resources in planned environments. Lectures and practicums of physical 
design, site capabilities, landscape structuring, and landscape values. 

LDAR-803. Land-Use Planning and Management Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of human behavioral responses and use patterns within physical environ- 
ments, with emphasis on special group needs and compatability with landscape 
resource areas. Consideration of problems affecting a synthesis of landscape values 
and design forms, visual and psychological values of planned and unplanned environ- 
ments and relationships of social functions to landscape architectural forms. 

LDAR-604. Factors of Physical Design Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of human behavioral responses and use patterns within physical environ- 
ments, with emphasis on special group needs and compatability with landscape 
resource areas. Consideration of problems affecting a synthesis of landscape values 
and design forms, visual and psychological values of planned and unplanned envir- 
onments and relationships of social functions to landscape architectural forms. 



Department of Physics 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

PHYS-600. Physical Mechanics II Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of Physics 400. Prerequisites: Physics 400, Math 231. 
PHYS-603. Electromagnetism II Credit 3(3-0) 

Development and applications of the differential forms of Maxwell's equations. 
Prerequisites: Physics 403,, Math 231. 

PHYS-604. Electromagnetism III Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of Physics 603. Prerequisite: Physics 603. 
PHYS-605. Quantum Mechanics I Credit 3(3-0) 

Postulates of wave mechanics and Schrodinger equation. Solutions of the Schro- 
dinger equation for the harmonic oscillator, the square well, and the hydrogen atom. 
Concepts of spin and angular momentum. Approximate solutions of the Schrodinger 
equation, pertubation theory. Stark and Zeeman affects. Prerequisites: Physics 406 
and Math 231. 

PHYS-606. Nuclear Physics Credit 3(3-0) 

Nuclear structure, nuclear interactions, radioactive decay, reactions and cross- 
sections, nuclear forces, and scattering theory. Prerequisites: Physics 406 and Math 
231. 

PHYS-615. Quantum Mechanics II Credit 3(3-0) 

The problem of one and two electron atoms. Hydrogen atom and the alkalis. The 
hydrogen molecule and the molecular bond. The deuteron problem in nuclear phys- 
ics. Alpha decay. Scattering theory and the nature of the nuclear force. The motion of 
a particle in a periodic potential and the role of Quantum Mechanics in solids. 
Operator formalism. Prerequisite: Physics 605. 

PHYS-705. General Physics for Science Teachers I Credit 3(2-2) 

For persons engaged in teaching. Includes two hours of lecture demonstrations 
and one two-hour laboratory period each week. 

PHYS-706. General Physics for Science Teachers II Credit 3(2-2) 

A continuation of Physics 705. 



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PHYS-707. Electricity for Science Teachers Credit 2(2-0) 

Includes electric fields, potentials, direct current circuits, chemical and thermal 
emf s, electric meters, and alternating currents. For teaches. Prerequisite: College 
Physics. 

PHYS-708. Modern Physics for Science Teachers I Credit 2(2-0) 

An introductory course covering the usual areas of modern physics. Both courses 
may be combined during a single semester for double credit. For teachers only. 
Prerequisite: College Physics. 

PHYS-709. Modern Physics for Science Teachers II Credit 2(2-0) 

A continuation of Physics 708. 



Department of Political Science 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

POLI-604. Directed Study/Research Credit 3(0-6) 

Directed study or research on a specific topic in political science. (UPON 
DEMAND) 

POLI-640. Federal Government 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 2976) Credit 3(3-0) 

After a brief review of the structure and functions of the federal government, this 
course concerns itself with special areas of federal government: problems of national 
defense, the government as a promoter, the government as regulator, etc. Students 
will engage in in-depth study in one of the specific areas under consideration. (UPON 
DEMAND) 

POLI-641. Seminar in State Political Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

An in-depth study of special problems connected with operations of state and local 
governments. (UPON DEMAND) 

POLI-642. Modern Political Theory 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 5973) Credit 3(3-0) 

Includes selected political works for adherence to modern conceptions of the state, 
political institutions as well as the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Rousseau, 
Burke, Mill, Hegel, Marx and Dewey. (SUMMER) 

POLI-643. Urban Politics and Government Credit 3(3-0) 

A detailed analysis of the urban political arena including political machinery, 
economic forces and political structures of local governmental units. (FALL) 

POLI-644. International Law 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 543) Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the major principles and practices in the development of the Law of 
Nations, utilizing significant cases for purposes of clarification. Prerequisites: Pol. 
Sci. 200, 444. (UPON DEMAND) 

POLI-645. American Foreign Policy — 1945 to Present Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 2976) 

Examination of forces and policies that have emerged from Potsdam, Yalta, and 
World War II. Emphasis will be on understanding the policies that were formulated, 
why they were formulated, the consequences of their formulation, and the alterna- 
tive policies that may have come about. Prerequisites: Survey course in American 
History, American Diplomatic History, and consent of the instructor. (SPRING) 



203 



POLI-646. The Politics of Developing Nations 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 5974) Credit 3(3-0) 

Political structures and administrative practices of selected countries in Africa, 
Latin America, Asia, analysis of particular cultural, social and economic variables 
peculiar to the nations. (FALL) 

POLI-647. Research and Current Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of selected problems of current importance with an emphasis on the applica- 
tion of scientific methods of research and analysis. (SPRING) 

POLI-653. Urban Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of some of the major problems in contemporary urban America. This 
course includes an examination of their causes, effects and possible solutions. 
(SPRING) 

Graduate 

POLI-730. Constitutional Development Since 1865 

(Formerly History 2896) Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical study of the development of the Constitution since 1865. Treatment will 
be given to important Constitutional decisions, major documents, major Supreme 
Court decisions, and public policy. Assignments in paperback books will be frequent. 
(UPON DEMAND) 

POLI-741. Comparative Government 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 2899) Credit 3(3-0) 

Comparative analysis of the American system of government and selected foreign 
governments. Administration, organization, and processes in systems of these 
governments will also be considered. (SUMMER) 

POLI-742. Research and Current Problems 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 2980) Credit 3(3-0) 

Considered are fundamental concepts of scientific method of research; effective 
research procedures; techniques and sources used in research about government 
investigation of some current and recurrent problems inherent in Federalism and 
"State Rights", individualism and collective action, free enterprise and governmen- 
tal regulations. (UPON DEMAND) 

POLI-743. Readings in Political Science 

(Formerly Pol. Sci. 5985) Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected subjects arranged by student and teacher. It may include preliminary 
research in political theory or philosophy. (UPON DEMAND) 



Department of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

SPCH-633. Speech for Teachers Credit 2(2-0) 

Study and application of the fundamental principles of oral communication 
related to teaching and learning; speech activities and interpersonal relations identi- 
fied with teaching and learning and the teaching profession; exercises for self- 
improvement in the various speech processes. 

SPCH-636. Persuasive Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the theory and practice of persuasive speaking in the democratic society, 
including formal and informal persuasive speaking, types of proof, and the ethics of 
persuasion. Practice in the preparation and presentation of persuasive messages. 



204 



Theatre 

SPCH-620. Community and Creative Dramatics Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and function of creative dramatics and applications in elementary educa- 
tion; demonstrations with children; special problems for graduate students. 

SPCH-630. Early American Drama and Theatre 

to 1900 Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of significant developments in the American Theatre before 1900 as 
reflected through the major playwrights and theatre organizations. 

SPCH-631. Modern American Drama and Theatre 

since 1900 Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of significant developments in the American Theatre since 1900 as 
reflected through the major playwrights and theatre organizations. 

SPCH-650. Theatre Workshop Credit 3-6(0-6) 

A practicum involving the total theatrical experience. Involves units in acting, 
directing, stagecraft, designing and other such activities. Approximately 90 clock 
hours are devoted to technical production. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent 
of the instructor. 

SPCH-653. Principles and Practice of Stage Costume Credit 3(2-2) 

The function of costumes for the stage and for television, and their relationship to 
other elements of dramatic production. Includes research in construction and 
authentic period forms. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

SPCH-654. Problems in Acting (Advanced) Credit 3(3-0) 

Acting problems arising from differences in the types and style of dramatic 
production; emphasis on individual and group performance. Prerequisite: Theatre 
301. 

SPCH-655. Advanced Play Production Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of modern methods of staging and lighting plays. Directing on a multiple 
set; arena staging, intellectual values; script analysis. Prerequisites: Theatre 302, 
440, and 441. 

SPCH-656. Advanced Directing Credit 3(2-2) 

A consideration of rehearsal problems and techniques as may be reflected in the 
3-act play. In conjunction with the acting classes and the Richard B. Harrison 
Players, students direct projects selected from a variety of genres. Prerequisite: 
Theatre 440. 

Department of Sociology and Social Work 
Sociology 

SOCI-671. Research Methods II Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of Soc. 403. Prerequisite: Senior of graduate standing; minimum of 6 
to 9 credits in statistics and research. 

SOCI-672. Selected Issues in Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

Topics of current interest to sociologists and the student body are explored. 
SOCI-673. Population Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of social structural causes, correlates, and consequences of population 
trends. 

SOCI-674. Evaluation of Social Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

Theoretical, methodological and substantive aspects of program evaluation. 

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Anthropology 

SOCI-603. Introduction to Folklore Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic introduction to the study and appreciation of folklore. 
SOCI-650. Independent Study in Anthropology Credit 3(3-0) 

Enables the student to do readings and research in anthropology in cooperation 
with the instructor. 

SOCI-651. Anthropological Experience Credit 3(2-2) 

An exploration of anthropological theories and research methods with an empha- 
sis on qualitiative research methods. 

SOCI-701. Seminar in Cultural Factors in 

Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

Course is designed both to sensitize the student to the importance of cultural 
factors in non-verbal and verbal communication and to equip the student with ways 
to record and analyze this behavior. 

Infra-Departmental Courses 

SOCI-600. Seminar in Social Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Personal and social values as related to social planning: "systems" theories pro- 
gram planning and evaluation. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 

SOCI-601. Seminar in Urban Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the nature and problems of cities, urban society and urban 
development. 

SOCI-625. Sociology/Social Service Internship Credit 5(0-5) 

An internship to provide opportunities for students to enhance their employability 
by supervised experiences in selected agencies. 

SOCI-669. Small Groups Credit 3(3-0) 

Elements and characteristics of small group behavior and process. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing; permission of the instructor. 

SOCI-670. Law and Society Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines selected and representative forms of social justice and 
injustices; barriers to and opportunities for legal redress, as related to contemporary 
issues. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 



REFERENCE DEPT. 
F.D. BLUFORD LIBRARY 
N.C. A&T STATE UNIVERSITY 
GREENSBORO, NC 27411 



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